Volkswagen ID.4 electric SUV will be tested in South Africa during 2022

Gudnews

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Hybrid is surely the way to go as an introduction with our load shedding issues.
 

Danie_V

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If this costs more than Petrol would + a similar sized VW petrol car, it is pointless.
It is supposed to save a lot with cheaper running and maintenance costs so total cost of ownership really needs tio be considered
 

Danie_V

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I would not go for hybrid, don't like the idea. Just extra complexity.
And extra license costs - my hybrid with engine, electric motor and battery was a lot heavier, so my annual license cost reflected that. That said consumption was a lot lower as idling in the traffic was zero petrol. You still hav ethe full petrol side to maintain.
 

Danie_V

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This is so sweet... only 3 years ago or so I attended a motor show at Grand West Casino where VW had a big exhibition, and I remember asking the salesperson why there was no eGolf on show yet. His reply to me was, "they will never bring the eGolf of electric car to SA". I just laughed and thought he was really clueless. Wonder what that guy is thinking now...
 

Corelli

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So it would start at R1.5 million. Great.

Because import duty is about 100% and then there is vat

Bleh.
 

Danie_V

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So it would start at R1.5 million. Great.

Because import duty is about 100% and then there is vat

Bleh.
No as I recall there is bigger premium on bringing in electric cars to SA. It is a higher duty than for combustion engines!
 

mypetcow

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Hybrid is surely the way to go as an introduction with our load shedding issues.
Lol why? Just charge when there’s power. This isn’t Kinshasa. Even the worst load shedding will still let you comfortably charge around 40km of range for every hour it’s plugged in at home. With a total range of like 400km you’ll be fine
 

mypetcow

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It is supposed to save a lot with cheaper running and maintenance costs so total cost of ownership really needs tio be considered
So if this thing needs like 20kWh/100km then that will cost you like 20kWh*R2.00/kWh = R40.00 for each 100km you drive.

I guess a similarly sized car will use say 8l/100km in combined city/highway usage.
Then the cost will be like 8l*R19.00/l = R152 for each 100km you drive.

So R40 vs R152. Even if the cost of electricity would double over night an electric car would still be about half as expensive to run as a petrol or diesel equivalent.

From a cost per kilometer driven the electric car is way way lower. Plus electricity doesn’t go up as often as petrol or diesel so there’s that to take into account as well.
 

Arthur

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So if this thing needs like 20kWh/100km then that will cost you like 20kWh*R2.00/kWh = R40.00 for each 100km you drive.

I guess a similarly sized car will use say 8l/100km in combined city/highway usage.
Then the cost will be like 8l*R19.00/l = R152 for each 100km you drive.

So R40 vs R152. Even if the cost of electricity would double over night an electric car would still be about half as expensive to run as a petrol or diesel equivalent.

From a cost per kilometer driven the electric car is way way lower. Plus electricity doesn’t go up as often as petrol or diesel so there’s that to take into account as well.
Fair enough.

As with calcing the affordability of a domestic solar PV system, for most of us it makes sense to factor in the capital and maintenance costs and amortise them over the projected life of the system. For capital cost, it makes sense to consider only the EV premium over ICE equivalent, since one'll need a car anyway. Of course government will fiddle the taxes, changing the EV vs ICE balance...
 

Gaz{M}

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So if this thing needs like 20kWh/100km then that will cost you like 20kWh*R2.00/kWh = R40.00 for each 100km you drive.

I guess a similarly sized car will use say 8l/100km in combined city/highway usage.
Then the cost will be like 8l*R19.00/l = R152 for each 100km you drive.

So R40 vs R152. Even if the cost of electricity would double over night an electric car would still be about half as expensive to run as a petrol or diesel equivalent.

From a cost per kilometer driven the electric car is way way lower. Plus electricity doesn’t go up as often as petrol or diesel so there’s that to take into account as well.
Yes but if the car costs, say R100 000 more than a similar petrol car, then your "savings" just go to buy the thing in the first place.
 

Danie_V

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On the electricity supply issues unless you are doing the full range every day, you are only needing small tops to charge a bit. The added advantage with something like a Nissan Leaf is, the car's battery can also act as a UPS for the house. You get home at 5pm with 80% charge, plug-in, load shedding starts from 8pm and the car powers the house to 10pm, and then recharges from 10pm through the night. Bonus is you have the car as a mobile battery backup. In EU they are testing have EV fleets plugged in like this to help stabilise the grid. So far from being seen a burden on the electrical grid, EVs can actually benefit it. Hopefully that was why Eskom was testing a group of Nissan Leaf's out - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vehicle-to-grid
 
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