WACS undersea cable launched in South Africa

JStrike

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Aug 29, 2005
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Look, you can divert this discussion all you want, but my point is that there is no "broadband abundance". My 4mbps ADSL line is going out of fashion fast, I don't enjoy waiting 5 hours for my game to update & patch and I don't enjoy waiting for a 720p youtube video to buffer up.

I also don't enjoy 3G cost per MB being that prohibitively high.

There is most certainly broadband abundance.
I have FTTx
I also have 10Mb ADSL
Many other people have 4Mb ADSL
And even more people have 14Mb (or similar) 3G.

It might not be at the prices you like, but it is certainly widely available.

Not all broadband options are available at all locations, but that is the reality of life. However, more broadband services are being made available in more locations constantly.
If you are rural, broadband at all is unlikely (But once again, that is the reality of the world. It is similar in the USA)
 

jackshiels

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Aug 9, 2010
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Well, they have already put up an MSAN about 7 kilometres down my main road, so progress is being made there (even though it can't reach me :( ). I live near Rondebosch in CT.

Does anyone know what is going on with ZTE? If Telkom are actually attempting to get into gear why does it have to be stopped by the ruling!? It isn't fair... I want an MSAN out side my house :D
 

siraman

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Jan 13, 2009
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I was about to say "what is the outook on price decreases or increased caps for the same amount on the cellular networks"

Then this from the Vodacom statement

“International connectivity is actually a pretty small part of the overall cost of delivering a megabyte of data via mobile, so this isn’t going to change the economics of our industry overnight.

:(
 

Randux

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May 7, 2010
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"cheaper smart devices that everyone can afford. The second part is to ensure that the mobile networks can support the data traffic.”

“International connectivity is actually a pretty small part of the overall cost of delivering a megabyte of data via mobile, so this isn’t going to change the economics of our industry overnight"
it's business as usual no mention of cheaper data. Vodacom has ruined the WACS launch for me #crawls into bed crys
 

rpm

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Neotel enhances connectivity from South Africa to Africa and the world

Neotel press statement:

With the completion of the West Africa Cable System (WACS), operational as of 11 May 2012, Neotel retains its unique position as the only local telecommunications operator connected to each of South Africa’s established submarine cable systems. Neotel has built a strong fibre capability in South Africa linked to existing submarine cables. As a member of the WACS consortium, Neotel’s network is now even more robust, in line with the company’s stated strategy of investing in a high capacity national optical fibre backbone infrastructure.

Angus Hay, GM: Strategic Business Development at Neotel says, “For Neotel, this means that our customers are highly unlikely to experience downtime since we have the flexibility to move traffic from one cable to another in the event of any cable failure."

The addition of WACS to Neotel’s international connectivity dramatically increases the availability of reliable high capacity bandwidth to Western Europe and the Americas, by far the highest traffic route for the country. It also means that Neotel will be able to optimise its international costs by carrying traffic on cost-effective routes. While WACS has a design capacity of 5 Terabytes per second (TBps), of which about 500 Gigabytes per second (GBps) will be lit initially, this will also enable future expansion of Neotel’s bandwidth.

“We are committed to enabling business in South Africa through efficient and cost-effective telecommunications. We see ourselves as a catalyst for their global expansion plans, increasing their productivity and improving their own competiveness,” Hay adds.

Each of the cables that land in South Africa connects Neotel into the Tata Communications global submarine cable network. This provides Neotel direct access to Tata Communications’ global infrastructure which makes up 1/5th of the world’s internet routes and includes 24/7 access to the world’s first round-the-world fibre optic cable network, bringing increased capacity, resilience and enhanced communications links from South Africa to the rest of the world.

Being part of the Tata Communications global network also provides access to high bandwidth capacity services as well as broadcast media products, such as VideoConnect which enables Neotel to deliver live broadcasts for broadcasters and other media providers, reliably, via fibre rather than satellite.

“Neotel continues to bring innovative solutions to its customers, while giving them the efficiency of our fibre network and the unparalleled reliability of South Africa’s only converged network, with seamless integration into the largest undersea cable network in the world through Tata Communications,” concludes Hay.
 

abjater

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Oct 24, 2005
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We are all so excited about WACS, but in reality, how will it REALLY benefit us? Me being on the IS backbone, how much more international capacity will my network get from WACS? Same for all the other ISPs - what will the REAL advantage/benefit in network capacity and redundancy be for the end-user?

As another forum member said: the South Africa Factor will most probably be the reason for nobody telling us those bits of info, being company confidential kind of stuff / competive edge.

I want to be so bold and dare ANY of our ISPs/Network Providers: go look at http://manypossibilities.net/african-undersea-cables/ and be so bold and create a smiliar type of map and show us/your users what you have! Don't wys us your muis - wys ons jou muis se baie sterte !

Cat amongst the pigeons now!
 
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HavocXphere

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About 500Gbit/s
Shot. Maybe you should be writing the articles...

This whole design capacity thing is a joke. About as useful as one person at a bar telling the other how fast he'd drive his Veyron if he had one.
 

Necuno

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Sep 27, 2005
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What I want to see is....

Cables coming in equals local network/grid capacity.

Doesn't really matter if we have 1000000000000000000000000gbs cable and the "local pipe" can only handle 1kbps. They've been going strong now for months to bring 10mbs to my exchange, it's really a construct-as-you-go at the moment. We still sitting with unstable 4 meg lines, some even with unstable 384k lines.
 

koeksGHT

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When this cable starts taking affect in the consumer market there should be no such thing as a capped account anymore. Now we just need to improve local infrastructural to get every area connected in a mesh to provide the best possible network in the country! Well if they actually do that :p
 

ambo

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WACS is very important infrastructure as it is likely to be the main cable for the west coast. It provides a path that is geographically diverse from Seacom and EASSy and it will also be a substitute for SAT-3 that is now a little old.

I wouldn't get too excited about price though. The are various long term contracts that I've seen that have had the WACS discount included for a year already.
 

siraman

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The new cable adds over 400 Gigabits per second (Gbps) of international broadband capacity on launch, which is equal to the download of 4.8 million MP3 files or over 5 000 DVDs per minute.

Wow!! I'm no boffin,but is that ~33 840TB of hard drives in 24hrs, assuming 4.7GB per DVD?
 
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