WATCH | Bloemfontein biker fighting for his life after red robot crash

thechamp

Honorary Master
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Feb 26, 2011
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18,925
#85
A damaged jaw, some bruises and stitches. Remarkably, this was the extent of the injuries sustained by motorcyclist Jason Pieterse after a bakkie crashed into him at a traffic light. He was left for dead on the side of the road in Bloemfontein.

"I am grateful that I'm alive, because there's a lot of people who don't have the opportunity to be able to live," Pieterse told TimesLIVE from his bed at Pelonomi Hospital on Wednesday.
https://www.timeslive.co.za/news/so...-alive-bloem-biker-speaks-about-horror-crash/
 

Claymore

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Jan 20, 2004
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7,442
#86
1. Not stopping in the middle of the lane.
2. Staying in 1st gear.
3. Being aware of everything that is happening behind you, especially when vulnerable.

Not that the bike SHOULD have needed to do any of this but if he was paying attention behind him he could have attempted to move.

Being on a bike and being at higher risk the onus is on you to compensate for that risk, because **** does happen and you want to to your very best to reduce that ****.
This all sounds like rape excuses: "She shouldn't have been wearing provocative clothing, she should have been drinking, what was she doing there at night, she smiled at him".

Only one person there was at fault, and it wasn't the biker.
 

SauRoNZA

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#88
This all sounds like rape excuses: "She shouldn't have been wearing provocative clothing, she should have been drinking, what was she doing there at night, she smiled at him".

Only one person there was at fault, and it wasn't the biker.
No dude, it's got nothing to do with excuses and simply applying logic to your personal safety.

And yes I guess in that way it is much like rape excuses, because while the rapist is always the one at fault, you would be really stupid to go running around in dodgy areas late at night while knowing RAPISTS EXIST.

This is the same thing. We KNOW that people DRIVE LIKE **** so to NOT compensate for that is simply putting yourself at risk.

I've been riding motorycles every day of my life for more than a decade, there are ways to do that with lower risks and then there are ways (as in this example) that simply increases your risks (or keeps them sky high) for no real good reason at all.

If you are going to jump into a cage with a lion are you going to do it with some protection? Or throw caution to the wind and run in there naked hoping for the best knowing full well the likely results? The answer seems obvious.

It's a simple case for facing reality and compensating accordingly knowing how the world actually works and not living in a pipe dream.
 

dlk001

Executive Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2005
Messages
6,990
#89
Being on a bike and being at higher risk the onus is on you to compensate for that risk, because **** does happen and you want to to your very best to reduce that ****.
Unfortunately, you cannot always compensate for every hazard but in general, it helps to always do a risk assessment. Maybe this is one of those rare moments, a perfect storm of events/decisions.

I pray for his speedy recovery and for the Bakkie driver to go to hell.
 

SauRoNZA

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32,412
#91
Unfortunately, you cannot always compensate for every hazard but in general, it helps to always do a risk assessment. Maybe this is one of those rare moments, a perfect storm of events/decisions.

I pray for his speedy recovery and for the Bakkie driver to go to hell.
Exactly.

Riding bikes (safely) is all about risk assessment, calculation and mitigation.

Observation of your surroundings being the key to all of that.

I am astounded and happy he only got away with what are seemingly minor injuries all thins considered.
 

Blu82

Expert Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2005
Messages
1,537
#92
1. Not stopping in the middle of the lane.
2. Staying in 1st gear.
3. Being aware of everything that is happening behind you, especially when vulnerable.

Not that the bike SHOULD have needed to do any of this but if he was paying attention behind him he could have attempted to move.

Being on a bike and being at higher risk the onus is on you to compensate for that risk, because **** does happen and you want to to your very best to reduce that ****.
You can also add flashing your brake light if the terrain allows you to.
 

theratman

Executive Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2008
Messages
8,467
#93
Exactly.

Riding bikes (safely) is all about risk assessment, calculation and mitigation.

Observation of your surroundings being the key to all of that.

I am astounded and happy he only got away with what are seemingly minor injuries all thins considered.
Yeah very lucky, glad it sounds like he'll be alright. Wonder if he'll get on a bike again though.
 
Joined
Nov 22, 2009
Messages
18,467
#95
No dude, it's got nothing to do with excuses and simply applying logic to your personal safety.

And yes I guess in that way it is much like rape excuses, because while the rapist is always the one at fault, you would be really stupid to go running around in dodgy areas late at night while knowing RAPISTS EXIST.

This is the same thing. We KNOW that people DRIVE LIKE **** so to NOT compensate for that is simply putting yourself at risk.

I've been riding motorycles every day of my life for more than a decade, there are ways to do that with lower risks and then there are ways (as in this example) that simply increases your risks (or keeps them sky high) for no real good reason at all.

If you are going to jump into a cage with a lion are you going to do it with some protection? Or throw caution to the wind and run in there naked hoping for the best knowing full well the likely results? The answer seems obvious.

It's a simple case for facing reality and compensating accordingly knowing how the world actually works and not living in a pipe dream.
That's not always the case.
 
Joined
Apr 20, 2005
Messages
3,566
#96
Exactly.

Riding bikes (safely) is all about risk assessment, calculation and mitigation and a bit of luck.

Observation of your surroundings being the key to all of that.

I am astounded and happy he only got away with what are seemingly minor injuries all thins considered.
FTFY.

Part of it is also knowing when you have probably used up all the luck and it's time to call it a day. That came for me after all my buddies came down hard, the second one was killed and I had made it safely that far. I miss it, but nope.
 

SauRoNZA

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32,412
#98
FTFY.

Part of it is also knowing when you have probably used up all the luck and it's time to call it a day. That came for me after all my buddies came down hard, the second one was killed and I had made it safely that far. I miss it, but nope.
Luck is as realistic a concept as destiny and spooks.

But risk mitigation is exactly that, lowering your risk increases your "luck".

The higher your risk probability (the more chances you take) the less "luck" you have.

In general, the only time you need to have "luck" is if you were taking chances...and taking chances is a high-risk activity.

Luck is a construct of your own actions.
 
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