WATCH: Engineers move 8000 tonne bridge 14m sideways in Western Cape

Bonywasawarrioraway

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I get that locals up the prices when new blood comes to town, but as you said, this should be taken into account and considering the contractor went into business rescue and the project was handed over, I'm assuming they didn't.
imagine the headlines "HAMBURGER PRICE TORPEDOS BRIDGE"
 

SauRoNZA

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No.
"The new structure was designed by AECOM, an international engineering firm"
"local labour, aside from key skilled personnel, will be used during the building process"

They are a completely local entity operating completely independently.

They are owned by Americans of course, but they don’t do the work.

It’s all local.

What the article refers to is that local labour from the area will be used, instead of people brought in location to do the job from external areas.
 

chrisc

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The original contractor went into liquidation during lockdown. Even prior to that, they did minimal work during the previous year. The “Stop and Go” system has been in place for 4 years. On a bad day it can take 20 mins to drive from Montagu to Ashton. It was completed within the budget

The chief engineer was killed by a careless driver early on during the contract while supervising some work

The actual bridge is visually stunning and an asset to an otherwise very ordinary and a bit run down small town. All the best houses are up in the mountain
 

SaucePlz

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They are a completely local entity operating completely independently.

They are owned by Americans of course, but they don’t do the work.

It’s all local.

What the article refers to is that local labour from the area will be used, instead of people brought in location to do the job from external areas.
Explains why it's late and (probably) over budget. /s

Thanks for the clarification.
 

Gordon_R

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Anyone who thinks local journalism is bad, should read this link that I just stumbled upon:

I see the OP says 400 tons, seems to be a big discrepancy! IOL says 8000 tons:
 
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CommonSense

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No.
"The new structure was designed by AECOM, an international engineering firm"
"local labour, aside from key skilled personnel, will be used during the building process"

"The pre-existing bridge had been flooded on numerous occasions over the years during high rains."


What is a pre-existing bridge? Remember this is an article from 2016.
Before existing it has been flooded on numerous occasions? That takes some doing.
 

Arthur

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Marvellous. Can't wait to use the bridge, hopefully in the next few weeks. It's been under construction ever since I moved from Joburg to the Little Karoo.
 

Gordon_R

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"The pre-existing bridge had been flooded on numerous occasions over the years during high rains."


What is a pre-existing bridge? Remember this is an article from 2016.
Before existing it has been flooded on numerous occasions? That takes some doing.

There were numerous cases where the bridge flooded previously, well documented in news reports. It's a narrow valley draining a huge area subject to flash flooding. The risk justification is mentioned in the 2017 link I posted earlier:

See:
A reminder of the powerful forces of erosion was provided in January 1981, when heavy rains in the southern Karoo caused the Keisie and Kingna rivers to flood and meet at their confluence in Montagu, before rushing through Cogmanskloof to Ashton and the Breede River, with considerable loss of life and damage to property. The road is to be raised and realigned to minimise flood damage in years to come.
 

dualmeister

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Always amused me that you drive through this little town and suddenly you hit by this engineering monster. Thought they would never finish. Drove past it on so many annual road trips.
 

buka001

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I think it just means the bridge is at an angle to the river crossing, allowing free-flowing traffic. Normally it would span the shortest distance, but steep terrain means it has to cross slantways. It's not unique, just a sub-category of all bridges.
No.

Means they built it alongside its future position.

After it is complete, they jack it "sideways" into its final position.
 

D tj

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Slow move, hell 500 tons of TV's would have moved a lot faster in Dbn.
 

T_d_T_M

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What does this mean?
Ordinarily, bridges are launched longitudinally. When it comes to bridges of this kind of magnitude, its normal practice to cast and then launch using hydraulic jacks to "push" the bridge along the length of it, per segment which is cast (in concrete).

In this case, segments were cast and "pushed" transversely - I am a bridge engineer and haven't heard of this happening before - it takes a lot of engineering skill to pull (or push ;)) this off because its an incredibly non-traditional design.

It's done for traffic accomodation. Bridge design and construction is really tricky, because each day the road is out of commission, its a significant cost to the economy. A transverse launch eliminates the traffic requirement associated with bridge construction as traffic can be diverted onto the new deck.

All in all, its a pretty fantastic piece of engineering work. AECOM have a large presence in SA - I'm not sure whether the local design teams would have done the design, but regardless, some amazing skills transfer would have taken place on both the design and construction sides.
 

buka001

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Ordinarily, bridges are launched longitudinally. When it comes to bridges of this kind of magnitude, its normal practice to cast and then launch using hydraulic jacks to "push" the bridge along the length of it, per segment which is cast (in concrete).

In this case, segments were cast and "pushed" transversely - I am a bridge engineer and haven't heard of this happening before - it takes a lot of engineering skill to pull (or push ;)) this off because its an incredibly non-traditional design.

It's done for traffic accomodation. Bridge design and construction is really tricky, because each day the road is out of commission, its a significant cost to the economy. A transverse launch eliminates the traffic requirement associated with bridge construction as traffic can be diverted onto the new deck.

All in all, its a pretty fantastic piece of engineering work. AECOM have a large presence in SA - I'm not sure whether the local design teams would have done the design, but regardless, some amazing skills transfer would have taken place on both the design and construction sides.
I think VSL did the jacking. Although they have a local presence (RMS use to have stake in them), they are part of the Bouygues group of companies.

They probably brought in their experts who have done this in the EU.
 

Gordon_R

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Can someone please confirm the weight! There is a huge discrepancy between the OP of 400 tons, and multiple sources stating 8000 tons.
 

animal531

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Ordinarily, bridges are launched longitudinally. When it comes to bridges of this kind of magnitude, its normal practice to cast and then launch using hydraulic jacks to "push" the bridge along the length of it, per segment which is cast (in concrete).

In this case, segments were cast and "pushed" transversely - I am a bridge engineer and haven't heard of this happening before - it takes a lot of engineering skill to pull (or push ;)) this off because its an incredibly non-traditional design.

It's done for traffic accomodation. Bridge design and construction is really tricky, because each day the road is out of commission, its a significant cost to the economy. A transverse launch eliminates the traffic requirement associated with bridge construction as traffic can be diverted onto the new deck.

All in all, its a pretty fantastic piece of engineering work. AECOM have a large presence in SA - I'm not sure whether the local design teams would have done the design, but regardless, some amazing skills transfer would have taken place on both the design and construction sides.

You seem to know your stuff.
I was wondering why they don't just build next door to the old bridge and then shift the road there? Wouldn't that be a lot easier/cheaper than moving the bridge?
 

Gordon_R

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You seem to know your stuff.
I was wondering why they don't just build next door to the old bridge and then shift the road there? Wouldn't that be a lot easier/cheaper than moving the bridge?

The bridge has to align with the existing roads on either side, to maintain traffic flow. None of the articles illustrate this well, and you have to freeze-frame one of the videos to see why.
 
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