We need encryption for good TV in South Africa, says E-tv

deweyzeph

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Funny, the UK doesn't seem to be concerned about encryption for digital TV and they actually produce stuff worth watching, unlike ETV. ETV clearly has delusions of grandeur if they think anybody would want to copy the crap they broadcast.
 

grim

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More corporate greed speaking.

There's a very good reason I don't own a TV, have a TV license or a DSTV subscription
 

Nether

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There is nothing worth copying on eTV, why bother with the extra cost of encryption?
 
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Baxteen

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I think you are missing the point slightly I am talking to everyone saying the content is bad so there is no need for encryption.

as they state in order for ETV to get licencing to broadcast better programs in south africa they need to have protected the content to an extent.

also the BBC does not need to protect the content they produce as they simply make it available for download online, and lets face it that is even easier than "recording" it yourself.
 

km2

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I think you are missing the point slightly I am talking to everyone saying the content is bad so there is no need for encryption.

as they state in order for ETV to get licencing to broadcast better programs in south africa they need to have protected the content to an extent.

also the BBC does not need to protect the content they produce as they simply make it available for download online, and lets face it that is even easier than "recording" it yourself.
Sure, they can have their own STBs with encryption and run with that for the tiny proportion of the market that will bother getting e-tvs pay content. I just don't think it's appropriate to set government policy that forces all STB in the country to require encryption to avoid being blackmailed by some threat of a lack of content and appease the imaginary fears of international content companies.

As far as separate power "wall warts"? I don't like trying to fit those onto a power strip and I much prefer internal power supplies, and these devices aren't that expensive so as to be a disaster if they break. I have multiple DStv decoders and they all have internal power supplies and they've worked fine.

eTV just wants to be able to legislate into existence a large install base for their sub-par pay TV offerings, and I don't want to have to trade away cheaper receivers, more receiver options, better DVR options, potential network streaming and more for it.
 

Sonic2k

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The truth: "The MPAA is telling us we need to encrypt otherwise we can't get the top shows"
The reality: They have to not only encrypt the RF part, they will have to put DRM on the video outputs too.
 

znh

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Just shut down the TV services already... convert it to LTE bandwith...
Video on Demand is the way forward...
 

einad5

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Yup we definitely need encryption. It will stop all those evil pirates from making copies of Transformers 7 years after the original release.
I wish our broadcasters could wake up and stop spouting nonsense, but I think hoping for a unicorn as a birthday gift is more realistic.
 

T3rminator

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Etv, go **** yourselves.

Any encryption implemented now will be broken in a few years and with the swipe of a pen require users to buy new STBs (See Multichoice et al.). Also, STBs are supposed to be temporary for owners of analog receiver TV's while digital TV owners can continue without hastle, how are you going to convince TV manufacturers to implement your wacky encryption standards?
 

Syphonx

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I have no interest or need to pirate a tv show or movie that came out a decade ago.
 

Grep

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If I am reading this right, ETV only has broadcasting rights of content which the owner does not care if it's copied. Be it two years old or twenty, the only way to fix the issue is to encrypt it which will circumvent the issue.
 

Paul Hjul

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If I am reading this right, ETV only has broadcasting rights of content which the owner does not care if it's copied. Be it two years old or twenty, the only way to fix the issue is to encrypt it which will circumvent the issue.
that is the jist of it
without encryption ETV will have to decide whether to roll out their own STBs with encryption (thereby reducing their subscriber base) or to not carry certain content because the distributors won't allow it
 

JustAsk

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Just noise...

The goverment boxes will have encryption,the broadcast is not.If you want to do paytv on the subsidized box,you pay a fee...the same fcking fee a paytv operator would've paid for its own encryption but the advantage here is instant access to subsidized boxes.Boxes you do not have to pay for.
 

kidcolt

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Awaiting a mod on the article the but my 2 cents...

IMHO and pardon the french, but this is a load of sh#t. This is a unnecessary adding of expenses for the ZA standard and decoders which only needs to basically carry FTA SABC (who's content is already blanket licensed for SA by our licensing laws). If E-tv gets their way it means that the decoders will be more expensive than they need to be, and that we the consumers are ALWAYS going to need to pay more to buy set-top boxes as, while TV manufactures may be willing to support the open DVB-T/2 standards in their sets they are unlikely to be willing to try and support all the different encryption standards nor have the support nightmare of have a CAM slot on the unit.

As I see it E-TV and their parent company are a for profit organisation who want us the consumer to carry the expense of enabling their business model... screw that. Since the majority of us are going to have to shell out for these set-tops before switch-over date (plus government/tax payer money will probably subsidize the low end units for the lower income bracket viewers).

If they want to continue making money then they should distribute their own set-top boxes to the people that actually want their services. Just like OVHD, etc.

Jeepers!... next Multi-choice will want their encryption build in as well so that consumer and government also reduce their "pesky" decoder costs.
 

Captain Beer

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The solution seems pretty straightforward. Let etv encrypt their "premium" content and sell their own decoder. This decoder must also allow access to non encrypted services. Problem solved.
Sort of like the old MNet decoders.
 

cfilorux

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Nostalgia

Ah yes, eTV, I remember it well, along with video recorders, VHS and Beta. Back in the days when the moving pictures were analogue, I once watched Judge Dredd with the chin of Sylvester Stallone, IIRC. It was cool. Wow. Etv! So they're still in business? That's amazing! It's like a blast from the past!
 
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ThinkCentre

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E-TV is really a big bunch of idiots! You get a dish from DSTV and pay R20 a month and you see much better stuff on it than the crap from E-TV. Most of E-TV's movies is available to watch on YouTube without any irritating adverts in any case!
 
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