We tested the new Netflix Ultra package - including its "highest quality audio" setting

Jamie McKane

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DrJohnZoidberg

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This is not for people listening through web browsers, it's intended for high end audio receivers. Even then i doubt the average person would hear much of a difference if any at all.
 

Dolby

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I don't think another R70.00pm for high quality sound is worth it for movies, tbh.

What would have been interesting though, is the data use of a non-Ultra package and Ultra package, to see exactly how many extra bits they're squeezing in?
 

Werfetter

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For example, using Chrome on a MacBook Pro allowed us to sign up for the Ultra package. Using Safari on the same MacBook Pro did not present the Ultra package on the sign-up screen.

Then why when you ran the test did you run Ultra on Safari? I would think that the reason why you did not get the option was probably because even Netflix have not tested it in Safari and so do not officially support it? Time = wasted
 

konfab

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I don't think another R70.00pm for high quality sound is worth it for movies, tbh.
Of course it won't, you need special audiophile ethernet cables to truly appreciate the difference. :p

What would have been interesting though, is the data use of a non-Ultra package and Ultra package, to see exactly how many extra bits they're squeezing in?
My bet is that it would be exactly the same.
 

bwana

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For example, using Chrome on a MacBook Pro allowed us to sign up for the Ultra package. Using Safari on the same MacBook Pro did not present the Ultra package on the sign-up screen.
I tested it with both safari and chrome on multiple accounts, including some which were already premium accounts, and none of them showed me the option for Ultra.
 

Moosedrool

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This is not for people listening through web browsers, it's intended for high end audio receivers. Even then i doubt the average person would hear much of a difference if any at all.

Waste of money. Already at 48khz 24bit.

Any moron who come out of the woodwork who say they can actually tell the difference will be hearing the effect of audio engineers struggling with their filters at 96khz. Noise between 22khz and 48khz audio frequencies will slam compressors and create all sorts of unwanted artifacts in the audible range for the ones with phenomenal hearing.
 

Ancalagon

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If Netflix were serious about marketing this, they should have provided a LOT more details on what exactly high quality audio means. If I was a serious audiophile, and I'm not, I'd want to know exactly what encoding that means, what technologies, what bitrates, what platforms are supported, etc etc.

For instance, if they told me that the audio was encoded at twice the bitrate and up to Dolby 7.1 (or whatever the latest and greatest standard is), that is something. And, I would want to know if this affects all titles, or just some. And, if some, how many?

You can sell high audio quality to audiophiles, but if you do, you have to tell them exactly what that means.
 

Sinbad

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Nah that's part of the Premium package already.

Honestly not sure what more they could be adding.
Shew, ok.
Should consider going premium then. But apparently not supported on most Android tv boxes
 

Dolby

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Should consider going premium then. But apparently not supported on most Android tv boxes

Check the other thread on devices

  • Apple TV 4K (requires tvOS 12 or later)
  • LG OLED TVs (2017 or newer models)
  • Pixela 4K Smart Tuner
  • Sony BRAVIA Android TVs (2018 models)
  • Windows 10 app (requires Windows 10 RS3 Build 16299 or later)
  • Xbox One, Xbox One S, and Xbox One X
 

konfab

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If Netflix were serious about marketing this, they should have provided a LOT more details on what exactly high quality audio means. If I was a serious audiophile, and I'm not, I'd want to know exactly what encoding that means, what technologies, what bitrates, what platforms are supported, etc etc.
If audiophiles could understand all those things like bitrate, Nyquist frequency and sampling theory they wouldn't be audiophiles.

For instance, if they told me that the audio was encoded at twice the bitrate and up to Dolby 7.1 (or whatever the latest and greatest standard is), that is something. And, I would want to know if this affects all titles, or just some. And, if some, how many?
Twice the bitrate != Twice the "quality" if you are using an efficient lossy compression scheme. And even if you are using raw PCM, twice the bitrate != twice the perceptible quality as our ears are simply not able to hear a 1/2^24 level difference between one sample and another going at 48000Hz.

You can sell high audio quality to audiophiles, but if you do, you have to tell them exactly what they want to hear
FTFY
 

Ancalagon

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Twice the bitrate != Twice the "quality" if you are using an efficient lossy compression scheme. And even if you are using raw PCM, twice the bitrate != twice the perceptible quality as our ears are simply not able to hear a 1/2^24 level difference between one sample and another going at 48000Hz.

You may realize that, but many audiophiles don't. They throw around technical terms without understanding them.

My point is, if you want to market something to people who think of themselves as technical, throw in that jargon! Be specific, even if the doubling of the sampling rate will really do nothing for them. They will get a warm fuzzy feeling knowing that they are listening to 96 kHz 24 bit audio in 7.1.
 
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