Web Squad ISP

websquadza

WebSquad
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Chiller89

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Joined
Jul 15, 2010
Messages
245
Thanks @websquadza - something is still unhappy though, worked fine for a bit and now Google services appear totally unavailable again, (gmail, youtube, 8.8.8.8, 8.8.4.4) all unavailable.
 

Meester

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Joined
Feb 28, 2007
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131
What is that yo-yo song's title again??
 

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websquadza

WebSquad
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Mar 26, 2018
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2,490
Thanks @websquadza - something is still unhappy though, worked fine for a bit and now Google services appear totally unavailable again, (gmail, youtube, 8.8.8.8, 8.8.4.4) all unavailable.
seeing the same
/me is looking for the "Me Too" like button
I spoke too soon, still dropping connection intermittently.
What is that yo-yo song's title again??
Sorry everyone, we're trying to push a permanent fix, and broke things. Rolling back now
 

websquadza

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Mar 26, 2018
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CPT Update; we tracked down the issue to a setting on a peering edge router in JHB resulting in incorrect routes being leaked into our core network and causing traffic to bounce around internally. We applied a fix to this and tried bringing the offending edge router back into production for CPT bound traffic, but this didn't go as planned (second round of issues at 15:10). We've withdrawn this edge router altogether for the time being, while we review all the configs and filters to make sure we haven't missed something. Things are stable again, apologies for the inconvenience today, and thanks for your patience while we sorted it out.
 

Beylie

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Jul 4, 2009
Messages
1,028
Definitely. This is an awesome box. Have you tweaked the MSS settings yet?
I have and unfortunately it didn't make any difference. Even set up a direct PPPOE connection, same results. Interestingly MS Edge shows the expected speed whereas Brave and Chrome doesn't. The Ookla app also insists that my upload speed is 130Mbit only. The plot thickens.
 

JustAnotherSouthAfrican

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Joined
Oct 21, 2017
Messages
132
@websquadza Heyo, I'm just curious to know why latency to CINX is 35ms, while latency to the other SAIX exchanges are normal for a connection originating in Cape Town - Johannesburg 19ms, Pretoria 19ms, Durban 27ms.
 

websquadza

WebSquad
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Mar 26, 2018
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@websquadza Heyo, I'm just curious to know why latency to CINX is 35ms, while latency to the other SAIX exchanges are normal for a connection originating in Cape Town - Johannesburg 19ms, Pretoria 19ms, Durban 27ms.

Do you have a traceroute? So remember, CINX is a peering fabric, like NAP. Not an actual destination.. also CINX isn't related to SAIX (Openserve, now called webreach) in any way. Which peer are you trying to reach on CINX?35ms sounds more like a peer who we're not picking up directly at CINX as 35ms is a two way round trip from JHB.
 

websquadza

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I have and unfortunately it didn't make any difference. Even set up a direct PPPOE connection, same results. Interestingly MS Edge shows the expected speed whereas Brave and Chrome doesn't. The Ookla app also insists that my upload speed is 130Mbit only. The plot thickens.
Interesting that Edge is giving the right results. Have you tried TCP Optimiser?
 

JustAnotherSouthAfrican

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Joined
Oct 21, 2017
Messages
132
Do you have a traceroute? So remember, CINX is a peering fabric, like NAP. Not an actual destination.. also CINX isn't related to SAIX (Openserve, now called webreach) in any way. Which peer are you trying to reach on CINX?35ms sounds more like a peer who we're not picking up directly at CINX as 35ms is a two way round trip from JHB.
Ahh... I retarded on that one. I meant the openserve or webreach or whatever the name decides to be this time speedtest servers. I just figured that it was all referred to as SAIX because of this URL allowing me to select all different servers: http://telkom-saix.speedtestcustom.com/

Pinging the Cape Town node as defined here: https://webreach.openserve.co.za/speed-test-servers

I get these results, woo for rooting through Johannesburg - experienced this with Bitco in the past and it drove me nuts:

Code:
  1    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  fw.lh [10.10.10.1]
  3     1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  core.as-01.cp1.za.ws.net.za [160.119.233.161]
  4     1 ms     1 ms     1 ms  100.99.197.1
  5     1 ms     1 ms     1 ms  165-69-148-197.as37497.za.net [197.148.69.165]
  6     1 ms     1 ms     1 ms  162-68-148-197.as37497.za.net [197.148.68.162]
  7     2 ms     2 ms     2 ms  63-218-189-25.static.pccwglobal.net [63.218.189.25]
  8    18 ms    17 ms    17 ms  TenGE0-0-2-1.br01.jnb01.pccwbtn.net [63.223.48.70]
  9    17 ms    17 ms    17 ms  TenGE0-0-2-1.br01.jnb01.pccwbtn.net [63.223.48.70]
 10    18 ms    18 ms    18 ms  mi-za-bry-pe6-gi2-0-3012.ip.isnet.net [196.33.119.97]
 11    18 ms    18 ms    19 ms  168.209.86.218
 12    18 ms    18 ms    18 ms  168.209.86.217
 13    17 ms    19 ms    18 ms  168.209.1.179
 14    20 ms    18 ms    19 ms  196-60-9-107.ixp.joburg [196.60.9.107]
 15    39 ms    39 ms    39 ms  196.25.37.9
 16    37 ms    38 ms    37 ms  196.25.37.13
 

websquadza

WebSquad
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Mar 26, 2018
Messages
2,490
Ahh... I retarded on that one. I meant the openserve or webreach or whatever the name decides to be this time speedtest servers. I just figured that it was all referred to as SAIX because of this URL allowing me to select all different servers: http://telkom-saix.speedtestcustom.com/

Pinging the Cape Town node as defined here: https://webreach.openserve.co.za/speed-test-servers

I get these results, woo for rooting through Johannesburg - experienced this with Bitco in the past and it drove me nuts:

Code:
  1    <1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  fw.lh [10.10.10.1]
  3     1 ms    <1 ms    <1 ms  core.as-01.cp1.za.ws.net.za [160.119.233.161]
  4     1 ms     1 ms     1 ms  100.99.197.1
  5     1 ms     1 ms     1 ms  165-69-148-197.as37497.za.net [197.148.69.165]
  6     1 ms     1 ms     1 ms  162-68-148-197.as37497.za.net [197.148.68.162]
  7     2 ms     2 ms     2 ms  63-218-189-25.static.pccwglobal.net [63.218.189.25]
  8    18 ms    17 ms    17 ms  TenGE0-0-2-1.br01.jnb01.pccwbtn.net [63.223.48.70]
  9    17 ms    17 ms    17 ms  TenGE0-0-2-1.br01.jnb01.pccwbtn.net [63.223.48.70]
10    18 ms    18 ms    18 ms  mi-za-bry-pe6-gi2-0-3012.ip.isnet.net [196.33.119.97]
11    18 ms    18 ms    19 ms  168.209.86.218
12    18 ms    18 ms    18 ms  168.209.86.217
13    17 ms    19 ms    18 ms  168.209.1.179
14    20 ms    18 ms    19 ms  196-60-9-107.ixp.joburg [196.60.9.107]
15    39 ms    39 ms    39 ms  196.25.37.9
16    37 ms    38 ms    37 ms  196.25.37.13

Short answer:
Unfortunately we only pick up Webreach/SAIX traffic in JHB from upstreams who purchase transit/peer with Webreach.

Long answer:
Basically this comes down to settlement free and open peering (which 450+ networks manage to get right in SA). The only two networks in South Africa (who also have end-user services (let's call these eyeball IPs) on their networks and are not just transit networks) are Web Reach and Seacom; thoroughly stuck in the 1990s and convinced they can force ISPs to buy their transit. There was a time where these networks had a duopoly in SA, but it really isn't so anymore, and neither offer anything that would entice ISPs to pick them over the myriad of options that exist today; and strong-arming ISPs really isn't a way to get into our good books.

Some Peering and Transit background:

In it's simplest form, the internet is built of networks advertising their IPs (prefixes) to one another. How it works is that ISP A connects to a peering fabric (eg, NAP or JINX; we connect to all 6 in South Africa) and advertises their IPs to all the other peers. Sometimes a direct peering session is set up between peers. ISP B does the same. Now ISP A and ISP B can exchange traffic via the shortest possible path at a mutual exchange, without incurring direct bandwidth costs. For prefixes not advertised on the exchanges, ISPs purchase IP transit, from a network who has more peering, and so on and so forth until you get to your Tier 1 ISPs (who peer with everyone on a global scale).

SAIX/Webreach don't peer openly (which means some of their eyeball IPs aren't available directly at each exchange). For SAIX, we pick up these prefixes via two partners, but in JHB only. Things have changed a lot in recent years, there's hardly any content hosted on SAIX these days - so it's not really a measure for anything. Most content providers and all local networks peer directly at one of the exchanges (NAP JHB/CPT/KZN or CINX/DINX/JINX) all of which we have peering with directly for the shortest possible route...

The only way to peer with Webreach and Seacom (to reach eyeball IPs on their network, not anything else) is to buy overpriced transit from them (which we're really not inclined to do). Both still believe they have some sort of monopoly on internet in SA. The only people affected by their restrictive peering policies are their own clients at the end of the day.
 

JustAnotherSouthAfrican

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 21, 2017
Messages
132
Short answer:
Unfortunately we only pick up Webreach/SAIX traffic in JHB from upstreams who purchase transit/peer with Webreach.

Long answer:
Basically this comes down to settlement free and open peering (which 450+ networks manage to get right in SA). The only two networks in South Africa (who also have end-user services (let's call these eyeball IPs) on their networks and are not just transit networks) are Web Reach and Seacom; thoroughly stuck in the 1990s and convinced they can force ISPs to buy their transit. There was a time where these networks had a duopoly in SA, but it really isn't so anymore, and neither offer anything that would entice ISPs to pick them over the myriad of options that exist today; and strong-arming ISPs really isn't a way to get into our good books.

Some Peering and Transit background:

In it's simplest form, the internet is built of networks advertising their IPs (prefixes) to one another. How it works is that ISP A connects to a peering fabric (eg, NAP or JINX; we connect to all 6 in South Africa) and advertises their IPs to all the other peers. Sometimes a direct peering session is set up between peers. ISP B does the same. Now ISP A and ISP B can exchange traffic via the shortest possible path at a mutual exchange, without incurring direct bandwidth costs. For prefixes not advertised on the exchanges, ISPs purchase IP transit, from a network who has more peering, and so on and so forth until you get to your Tier 1 ISPs (who peer with everyone on a global scale).

SAIX/Webreach don't peer openly (which means some of their eyeball IPs aren't available directly at each exchange). For SAIX, we pick up these prefixes via two partners, but in JHB only. Things have changed a lot in recent years, there's hardly any content hosted on SAIX these days - so it's not really a measure for anything. Most content providers and all local networks peer directly at one of the exchanges (NAP JHB/CPT/KZN or CINX/DINX/JINX) all of which we have peering with directly for the shortest possible route...

The only way to peer with Webreach and Seacom (to reach eyeball IPs on their network, not anything else) is to buy overpriced transit from them (which we're really not inclined to do). Both still believe they have some sort of monopoly on internet in SA. The only people affected by their restrictive peering policies are their own clients at the end of the day.
You have a way of... how do I put this... making me actually want to read the long walls of text that you send. Thank you for the very thorough explanation.
 

HowTo

Expert Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2006
Messages
3,212
Hello @websquadza how long does the migration take.
MTS was supposed to release the line today or by end of day.
Will I be effected in anyway?
 
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