What Are We Doing As White English Speaking People in SA?

Lupus

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Please could you point out the who this --
"General in charge of the Boer War concentration camps were awarded medals "
was
and
What he received medals for ?

The Germans were busy with "concentration camps" long before the British
Ever heard of SHARK ISLAND at Luderitzbucht ?
Ever seen the myriad of unmarked HERERO graves on the outskirts of SWAkOPMUND !

The British were so good at -- "covering up" that they allowed a civilian Afrikaner photographer to accompany Emily Hobhouse into the "concentration camp" in Bloemfontein to take photographs of the people there.

Perhaps you may want to ask yourself WHY these camps were necessary ?
Did the British decide to go over to Guerilla warfare ?
or
Was this a decision of the Boer -- "Veggenerals" ? -- after the capitals of both Boer republics had fallen and both Republics occupied.

In any case ; in all of your long diatribe what I learn is that the British themselves did NOT want any fatalities in the camps
HOW do you supply rations if the Boers are blowing up the train lines all the time ?

The poison ( Kool-Aid ) worked well on you !

Here you go
Learn all about it here

"Confronting Horror: Emily Hobhouse and the Concentration Camp Photographs of the South African War"
MICHAEL GODBY
Kronos
No. 32 (November 2006), pp. 34-48
Published by: University of Western Cape

https://www.jstor.org/stable/41056558?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents
Also the camps were initially setup more as refugee camps for the displaced families of the boer. Sure the reason why they were displaced is because the British did do some scorched earth tactics but hey.
Though as an English South African why should I feel any more marginalised now then before? Afrikaans for the first 12 years of my life dominated everything, then for the following 26 it's been a lot better, more things in English, I don't have to use Radio 2000 anymore to watch TV, all the signs are in English first, the text books are in English. Even the Afrikaans section of my public library has shrunk considerably over the years and it used to be a staunch Afrikaans area.
 

eg2505

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Also the camps were initially setup more as refugee camps for the displaced families of the boer. Sure the reason why they were displaced is because the British did do some scorched earth tactics but hey.
Though as an English South African why should I feel any more marginalised now then before? Afrikaans for the first 12 years of my life dominated everything, then for the following 26 it's been a lot better, more things in English, I don't have to use Radio 2000 anymore to watch TV, all the signs are in English first, the text books are in English. Even the Afrikaans section of my public library has shrunk considerably over the years and it used to be a staunch Afrikaans area.
globalization happened, more and more people need to deal with things outside the country, and as most of it is made to be international,
hence English is understood by most people,

so Afrikaans, being a offshoot of dutch, is only centered in SA, nowhere else in the world,
even the Dutch speak a different variant of it.

eventually? maybe when the WC cedes from SA, and becomes a separate country, maybe it will see a resurgence.
 

Lupus

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globalization happened, more and more people need to deal with things outside the country, and as most of it is made to be international,
hence English is understood by most people,

so Afrikaans, being a offshoot of dutch, is only centered in SA, nowhere else in the world,
even the Dutch speak a different variant of it.

eventually? maybe when the WC cedes from SA, and becomes a separate country, maybe it will see a resurgence.
Flemish is really, really close to Afrikaans though it seems to be spoken faster. Also if the WC cedes from SA it won't speak Afrikaans it would be English, if the Free state or Northern Cape ceded maybe then,
 

eg2505

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Flemish is really, really close to Afrikaans though it seems to be spoken faster. Also if the WC cedes from SA it won't speak Afrikaans it would be English, if the Free state or Northern Cape ceded maybe then,
wouldn't you say if its that close, its an accent thing,

kind of like Australian English and US English sound different even though they are both English?
 

rambo919

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It is? Since when?
*FTFY
Talking honestly includes room for doubt of any important aspect, expressing doubt of some party lines (most commonly the halocaust) lands you jailtime. In this context it does not matter whether the doubts are real or not, whether anyone agrees with them or not, simply speaking them is illegal which is the problem.

Then there is the whole thing of nazism being cencored all over the place almost in an attempt to forget it ever happened, national delusion basically.
 

rambo919

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Flemish is really, really close to Afrikaans though it seems to be spoken faster. Also if the WC cedes from SA it won't speak Afrikaans it would be English, if the Free state or Northern Cape ceded maybe then,
djy kennie di kap ni ne?
 

Lupus

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wouldn't you say if its that close, its an accent thing,

kind of like Australian English and US English sound different even though they are both English?
Don't know how close it is, but I've seen a Flemish speaker adapt really well to Afrikaans with a few words struggling, but this was a few years ago and my Afrikaans is awful to say the least.
If you want to struggle with an accent go to the Highlands of Scotland and try understand wtf they are saying, man I'm not sure if I just bought a pair of earrings or the ladies daughter while I was there tbh.
 

rambo919

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Translation from pig-kapie: You don't know the Cape do you?

From Cape Town to the eastern half of the country the majority of native people are white and coloured and speak afrikaans.... sometimes a difficultly understandable afrikaans but still. It's only in the subburb bubbles of cities that english is ever a majority.
 

Joeboy69

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Also the camps were initially setup more as refugee camps for the displaced families of the boer. Sure the reason why they were displaced is because the British did do some scorched earth tactics but hey.
Though as an English South African why should I feel any more marginalised now then before? Afrikaans for the first 12 years of my life dominated everything, then for the following 26 it's been a lot better, more things in English, I don't have to use Radio 2000 anymore to watch TV, all the signs are in English first, the text books are in English. Even the Afrikaans section of my public library has shrunk considerably over the years and it used to be a staunch Afrikaans area.
What was the life changing experience when you turned 13 that stopped Afrikaans from dominating your life?
 

rambo919

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Also the camps were initially setup more as refugee camps for the displaced families of the boer. Sure the reason why they were displaced is because the British did do some scorched earth tactics but hey.
This is a bit after the fact but anyway. That's a propaganda line, many famalies that were already sheltered with extended family in the cape colony were forcibly relocated against everyone invovled's wishes to the camps. The idea was always to terrorize the Boere into giving up by mistreating their families. The British empire was only ever actually humanitarian whenever political preassure forced it, this was true in all territories. They were way too arrogant to ever think of treating those "lower" than themselves well even in Britain itself.
 
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