What book are you reading at the moment ?

UrBaN963

Honorary Master
Joined
Jul 27, 2016
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12,945
Recently finished: The Last Wish by Andressjzadj Shzantaplanklsyw

Now reading: Sword of Destiny by Andrwsjaie Scjapkonwksyahi
 

kolaval

Expert Member
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May 13, 2011
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4,374
1583328030340.png


Duno, how I'm going to finish it.
Can a book be both boring and interesting at the same time?

Interesting was
-initially native americans did not regard whites as equals, so there was no honour in killing and taking the scalp.
They just killed them in conflicts for logistical reasons.
Once it was decided that it was honourable, things changed.

-Chiefs had little power over their people, if the young men wanted to raid/fight etc he was powerless to stop them( they could just as easily kill him), once again because war honourable.
 

rambo919

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Jul 30, 2008
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7,949
Difficult to read but the stuff sticks with you.
Dude, I did not manage to read further than chapter 11, maybe 1/4 into the first volume..... even reading about what happened is difficult I cannot imagine having to live through it.
 

rambo919

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Joined
Jul 30, 2008
Messages
7,949
View attachment 795245


Duno, how I'm going to finish it.
Can a book be both boring and interesting at the same time?

Interesting was
-initially native americans did not regard whites as equals, so there was no honour in killing and taking the scalp.
They just killed them in conflicts for logistical reasons.
Once it was decided that it was honourable, things changed.

-Chiefs had little power over their people, if the young men wanted to raid/fight etc he was powerless to stop them( they could just as easily kill him), once again because war honourable.
Completely demolishes the "noble savage" fallacy I'd imagine.
 

Aquila ka Hecate

Executive Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2010
Messages
5,348
I started getting into this Gurdjieff-related work:

2765551.jpg

But it began pissing me off by chapter 5. I've put it aside for the moment, but kept it on my bedside table, while I rather cleanse my brain with this:

63432.jpg
which is another oldie I'd forgotten to read.
 

David101

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2012
Messages
936
Very very interesting read


1973: Rock at the Crossroads
1973: Rock at the Crossroads
Andrew Grant Jackson (Goodreads Author)
A fascinating account of the music and epic social change of 1973, a defining year for David Bowie, Bruce Springsteen, Pink Floyd, Elton John, the Rolling Stones, Eagles, Elvis Presley, and the former members of The Beatles.

1973 was the year rock hit its peak while splintering—just like the rest of the world. Ziggy Stardust travelled to America in David Bowie’s Aladdin Sane. The Dark Side of the Moon began its epic run on the Billboard charts, inspired by the madness of Pink Floyd's founder, while all four former Beatles scored top ten albums, two hitting #1.

FM battled AM, and Motown battled Philly on the charts, as the era of protest soul gave way to disco, while DJ Kool Herc gave birth to hip hop in the Bronx. The glam rock of the New York Dolls and Alice Cooper split into glam metal and punk. Hippies and rednecks made peace in Austin thanks to Willie Nelson, while outlaw country, country rock, and Southern rock each pointed toward modern country. The Allman Brothers, Grateful Dead, and the Band played the largest rock concert to date at Watkins Glen.

Led Zep’s Houses of the Holy reflected the rise of funk and reggae. The singer songwriter movement led by Bob Dylan, Neil Young, and Joni Mitchell flourished at the Troubadour and Max’s Kansas City, where Bruce Springsteen, Bob Marley, and Iggy Pop shared bill. Elvis Presley’s Aloha from Hawaii Via Satellite TV special attracted more viewers than the moon landing, while Elton John’s albums dominated the number one spot for two and a half months.

Just as U.S. involvement in Vietnam drew to a close, Roe v. Wade ignited a new phase in the culture war. While the oil crisis imploded the American dream of endless prosperity, and Watergate’s walls closed in on Nixon, the music of 1973 both reflected a shattered world and brought us together.
(less)
 

Hephaestus

Forging
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Feb 24, 2016
Messages
29,840
Started this:



So far very good, a dragon with a drinking problem, internet connection and netflix. What could possibly go wrong
 

Aquila ka Hecate

Executive Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2010
Messages
5,348
Very very interesting read


1973: Rock at the Crossroads
1973: Rock at the Crossroads
Andrew Grant Jackson (Goodreads Author)
A fascinating account of the music and epic social change of 1973, a defining year for David Bowie, Bruce Springsteen, Pink Floyd, Elton John, the Rolling Stones, Eagles, Elvis Presley, and the former members of The Beatles.

1973 was the year rock hit its peak while splintering—just like the rest of the world. Ziggy Stardust travelled to America in David Bowie’s Aladdin Sane. The Dark Side of the Moon began its epic run on the Billboard charts, inspired by the madness of Pink Floyd's founder, while all four former Beatles scored top ten albums, two hitting #1.

FM battled AM, and Motown battled Philly on the charts, as the era of protest soul gave way to disco, while DJ Kool Herc gave birth to hip hop in the Bronx. The glam rock of the New York Dolls and Alice Cooper split into glam metal and punk. Hippies and rednecks made peace in Austin thanks to Willie Nelson, while outlaw country, country rock, and Southern rock each pointed toward modern country. The Allman Brothers, Grateful Dead, and the Band played the largest rock concert to date at Watkins Glen.

Led Zep’s Houses of the Holy reflected the rise of funk and reggae. The singer songwriter movement led by Bob Dylan, Neil Young, and Joni Mitchell flourished at the Troubadour and Max’s Kansas City, where Bruce Springsteen, Bob Marley, and Iggy Pop shared bill. Elvis Presley’s Aloha from Hawaii Via Satellite TV special attracted more viewers than the moon landing, while Elton John’s albums dominated the number one spot for two and a half months.

Just as U.S. involvement in Vietnam drew to a close, Roe v. Wade ignited a new phase in the culture war. While the oil crisis imploded the American dream of endless prosperity, and Watergate’s walls closed in on Nixon, the music of 1973 both reflected a shattered world and brought us together.
(less)
What a great year for music. Large portions of my personal playlist are from that year.
 

rambo919

Executive Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2008
Messages
7,949
^That's racist, cue, eff and blf
That unfortunately for them it was only in the 1960-70's that most of Africa's blacks stopped living like this. In Ovamboland alone it was common for them to still be completely naked and barely surpass iron age levels of technology, some tribes in deeper Africa were still stone age, same thing in the Amazon I think.
 

Vrotappel

Bulls fan
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Feb 22, 2005
Messages
18,316
Finished The Light Brigade - Kameron Hurley
then finished The Stars Are Legion from the same author

Now busy with Skyward - Brandon Sanderson
 

only1cr

Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2020
Messages
20
Thanks to the lockdown just finished some of the following,

The Doors of Eden - Adrian Tchaikovsky - Sci - Fi - 4 stars very cool and engaging,very thick,but great a read,

Confessions of a 40 something F##k up - Alexandra Potter, 5 stars a laugh out loud chick lit,very funny, stunning and will keep you reading till the end.

Neon - GS Locke, 3 stars could have been more than what it actually was but will worth a pickup if you into serial killers, love when the killer plays cat and mouse with the police.

The last train to London - Meg Waite Clayton - In the middle of reading this.

Unfortunately running out of books to read before lockdown ends,
taking down recommendations from you guys for future reads.
 

OrbitalDawn

Ulysses Everett McGill
Joined
Aug 26, 2011
Messages
42,611
Finished The Light Brigade - Kameron Hurley
then finished The Stars Are Legion from the same author

Now busy with Skyward - Brandon Sanderson
What did you think of Hurley's books?

Thanks to the lockdown just finished some of the following,

The Doors of Eden - Adrian Tchaikovsky - Sci - Fi - 4 stars very cool and engaging,very thick,but great a read,

Confessions of a 40 something F##k up - Alexandra Potter, 5 stars a laugh out loud chick lit,very funny, stunning and will keep you reading till the end.

Neon - GS Locke, 3 stars could have been more than what it actually was but will worth a pickup if you into serial killers, love when the killer plays cat and mouse with the police.

The last train to London - Meg Waite Clayton - In the middle of reading this.

Unfortunately running out of books to read before lockdown ends,
taking down recommendations from you guys for future reads.
You reading ebooks?

If you haven't, give Tchaikovsky's Children of Time a read.

Also have a look at Pierce Brown's Red Rising series - it's pretty great.
 
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