What programming Language do you like the most?

Wahat Programming language do you like the most ?

  • Python

    Votes: 28 21.4%
  • Java

    Votes: 10 7.6%
  • C++

    Votes: 15 11.5%
  • C#

    Votes: 43 32.8%
  • Other

    Votes: 35 26.7%
  • None.

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    131

Happy Sloth

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 11, 2022
Messages
259
Honestly I thought Java would score higher but it is sitting actually low on 8.5%

But thank you to everyone that participated.

The plan is to take this data to the young students we are helping out so that they can get a real world idea of the skills they will need moving forward.

The future looks like C# and Python... AND yes JavaScript really doing well... I was stupid not to add it in but I will have it in along with C and another good mention is CSS
 

Happy Sloth

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 11, 2022
Messages
259
If it is right with everyone can we have a another one of these in 3 months or so please?

:thumbsup: for yes OR :thumbsdown:For no

Reason is it gives youngsters a good idea what they should look at. This info really helps.

Thank you again this was awesome :D

Already took a screen shot and posted in our Community group. Thanks again for being awesome. :)
 

cguy

Executive Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2013
Messages
8,107
Honestly I thought Java would score higher but it is sitting actually low on 8.5%

But thank you to everyone that participated.

The plan is to take this data to the young students we are helping out so that they can get a real world idea of the skills they will need moving forward.

The future looks like C# and Python... AND yes JavaScript really doing well... I was stupid not to add it in but I will have it in along with C and another good mention is CSS
I just wanted to add that the popularity of a language doesn’t mean a whole lot. Demand vs supply is more important than absolute demand, and there are a lot of factors besides the language you use that determine whether or not you get employed, how well you’re compensated, and whether the job is tedious or exciting.
 

intrinzic

New Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2022
Messages
4
Elixir - it's syntactically elegant, concise and targets the BEAM - providing performant, resilient, and highly-available applications for free. The native developer tooling supporting it and dependency management is excellent. It's my first-choice for writing applications that require realtime capabilities. I would default to it in all cases if not for the current lack of support from major software vendors (for SDKs, clients, etc.) and the nascent developer community - relatively speaking. Aside, it's a joy to program using pure functional paradigms as an escape from the monotony of imperative languages and all the sorrows that come from them.

I've also recently started using Lua and found it surprisingly enjoyable. I use it as an embedded scripting language within game engine runtimes and backend systems. It's similar to Python and most distro's provide it by default and thus circumstantially widespread in where you can leverage it.
 

Nike7

Expert Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2019
Messages
1,205
Everything that can be written in JavaScript, will be written in JavaScript. Because finding JavaScript programmers (ahem) is easy and they don’t demand high salaries. So I was told.

I don’t like JavaScript but it is the fastest way to learn to code something that already has a UI so it’s fun for newbs and the web isn’t going anywhere.

On the other hand, the first languages you learn are fundamental to your programming skills and it’s tougher to unlearn bad habits than to learn good ones.

I love C because it helps me understand what the computer is actually doing. But it’s tough and can be tedious.

Can I just master a few languages and be done with it? Learning a new language to work on a project only to not need it ever again sounds so wasteful.
 

Happy Sloth

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 11, 2022
Messages
259
I just wanted to add that the popularity of a language doesn’t mean a whole lot. Demand vs supply is more important than absolute demand, and there are a lot of factors besides the language you use that determine whether or not you get employed, how well you’re compensated, and whether the job is tedious or exciting.
That is very true, for the most part Java pays the bills for me and I cannot deny this. But next month someone wants something in Python... This happens all the time. And yes a lot of demand for CSS lately... I am slowly getting better at it. But you are 100% on the money. For me this will always be exciting I am like a little kid with a big smile on my face when work. I just love it.
 

Happy Sloth

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 11, 2022
Messages
259
Everything that can be written in JavaScript, will be written in JavaScript. Because finding JavaScript programmers (ahem) is easy and they don’t demand high salaries. So I was told.

I don’t like JavaScript but it is the fastest way to learn to code something that already has a UI so it’s fun for newbs and the web isn’t going anywhere.

On the other hand, the first languages you learn are fundamental to your programming skills and it’s tougher to unlearn bad habits than to learn good ones.

I love C because it helps me understand what the computer is actually doing. But it’s tough and can be tedious.

Can I just master a few languages and be done with it? Learning a new language to work on a project only to not need it ever again sounds so wasteful.
JavaScript i have done a tiny bit of it but i am not good yet.

For me it was to a point more important to learn a language and then figure out the rest because if you know one it makes it easier to figure out the rest.
 

zippy

Honorary Master
Joined
May 31, 2005
Messages
10,191
They are all the same really. You just become more familiar with a particular environment and ide, and consequently more productive which leads to having a warm fuzzy feeling about that language. I couldn’t care less, myself. If I need to switch to another language I will. Done it enough times now.
 

Benedict A55h0le

Expert Member
Joined
Oct 21, 2020
Messages
3,830
They are all the same really. You just become more familiar with a particular environment and ide, and consequently more productive which leads to having a warm fuzzy feeling about that language. I couldn’t care less, myself. If I need to switch to another language I will. Done it enough times now.
Try c# then you don`t have to switch languages. They are not the same try writing a cloud AI with cobol or try some multithreading with node :), this is a long list...
 

zippy

Honorary Master
Joined
May 31, 2005
Messages
10,191
Try c# then you don`t have to switch languages. They are not the same try writing a cloud AI with cobol or try some multithreading with node :), this is a long list...

Referring more to the modern languages.

I have used C/C++, Objective C, C#, Perl, Python. Spent most of my time on C/C++ in conjunction with Oracle db. The user front end we used was Oracle Forms. Terrible thing that , but the backend processes where all done in C/C++ on the AIX Unix platform.

Currently working in Java/Gosu(Guidwire Insurance Suite).

They are all good languages and effective at what they do. I get that people have favourites. It doesn’t bother me if others see the need to use different languages.

I have been in this long enough to be wary of any “programming language evangelist”


If I really had too choose a favourite it would be Objective C, but in the U.K. there isn’t a big demand for it.

We currently have a lot of our services on Windows which written in C#. I do get to see a lot of that and we ported(not really the right word) some services from C# into the Guidewire platform as part of our migration from Oracle Application Server to Guidewire Insurance Suite, because the Guidewire platform can expose services which we couldn’t do while on Oracle App Server, and these services just make sense being closer to Insurance Suite.

Our public portals site for Insurance was also moved away from C# into the Guidewire platform. We still operate non insurance web sites on C# and our actuarial pricing systems are all on C# and will remain there.

I am quite happy working on the Guidewire platform.
 
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