Who can kick farther - football or rugby player?

Arthur

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#1
While waiting for my burgers this evening I overheard a loud discussion-argument between a group of young men outside Steers.

One side said that soccer players have much stronger legs, which is why they can kick a soccer ball nearly the full length of the field.

"Kyk hoe ver skop die sokka-players die bal. Daar's nie 'n rugbyspeler wat die bal so ver kan skop nie," the one group insisted.

The other side said that a top rugby kicker will win a kick-off against a top (Association) football kicker.

"Djulles dwaas, man. Rakbieskoppers sal enige sokkaskopper wen," the other side insisted.

I was tempted to venture my opinion that it's the shape of the ball that makes a big diffs to its aerodynamics and thus travel, but thought it better to stay quiet.

So which is it? Who can kick farther - football kickers or rugby kickers? And why?
 
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saor

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#2
Depends what they're kicking?
A rugby ball kicked like a torpedo might go much further than a football.
 

3WA

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#4
Are they kicking their own balls or each other's balls?

If they're kicking each other's balls, whoever goes second will be at a significant disadvantage.
 
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#5
If they were still using the old "Springbok" leather rugby ball then these youngsters would not have that argument.

Guys like Eric Herbert and Dewet Ras kicked penalty goals from near their 22m areas.

In terms of kicking out of hand many rugby players of yesteryear could kick the ball over their opponent's dead ball line from almost their own goal line. That's why the rule was changed!! (and the ball....)
 
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#6
Oh yes, and the new football in use is also much lighter than the good ol' leather ball we used back then. :D
 

Arthur

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#7
If they were still using the old "Springbok" leather rugby ball then these youngsters would not have that argument.

Guys like Eric Herbert and Dewet Ras kicked penalty goals from near their 22m areas.

In terms of kicking out of hand many rugby players of yesteryear could kick the ball over their opponent's dead ball line from almost their own goal line. That's why the rule was changed!! (and the ball....)
Interesting. Didn't know that.
 
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Arthur

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#9
Hehe. That ball is unnaturally round.

Still, I must say that the keepers in these World Cup soccer matches seem to get impressive distances.
 
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#10
And this one is unpolished... we had to treat it with dubbin so the ball would last longer and not be that prone to rainy conditions!

Old rugby ball.JPG
 

Fulcrum29

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#17
One side said that soccer players have much stronger legs, which is why they can kick a soccer ball nearly the full length of the field.
From conditioning alone, I highly doubt that. It is all in the technique.
 

Sweevo

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#18
One side said that soccer players have much stronger legs, which is why they can kick a soccer ball nearly the full length of the field.
Screenshot_2018-06-26-19-57-18.png

:crylaugh:
 
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bwana

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#20
Rugby:
The longest recorded successful drop goal is 77.7m (85yd) by Gerald Hamilton `Gerry' Brand (b. 8 Oct 1906) for South Africa v. England at Twickenham, Greater London, on 2 Jan 1932.
http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/world-records/longest-drop-kick-rugby-union/

Soccer:
The 24-year-old managed an incredible 75.35 m (247 ft 2 in) kick – with teammates Kyle Walker, Raheem Sterling and Phil Foden there to cheer him on.
http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com...-kick-title-as-yet-more-records-go-to-english
 
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