Why Discovery Vitality members live much longer than normal South Africans

quovadis

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Now if only someone would've asked for a deep dive into these stats and compared the average life expectancy of the vitality members whose claims were approved vs those whose claims were rejected.
 

krycor

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Pretty sure it has to do with the different LSM bracket discovery members are from the avg South African. Then when it comes to G&D members.. well duh.. they keeping active so other than cancer or genetic predisposed disease that can't easily be managed you'd expect a longer life.

Ps. this is like PPS claiming that their members are on average more wealthy as a result of membership when the entry requirement is a degree which in SA, gets you into a higher LSM group.
 

SaiyanZ

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If this wasn't true, Liberty, one of Discovery's biggest competitors, wouldn't be trying to use a persons Vitality Status to provide discounts on their life insurance premiums. Liberty would just use whatever other measure to give discounts, like the ones that people in this thread attribute the difference in expected lifetimes to.

Instead Liberty wants to use Vitality Status even with the threat of being sued by Discovery for using their intellectual property.

People can make assumptions but the life insurers have the actual data. Apparently if you are on Vitality and have the worst status (blue), then your life expectancy is worse than the average South African. So insured with medical aid is still bad if you lead a sedimentary lifestyle compared to someone without medical aid. Though Discovery won't dislcose stats like that as it doesn't give the message they want.
 
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krycor

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If this wasn't true, Liberty, one of Discovery's biggest competitors, wouldn't be trying to use a persons Vitality Status to provide discounts on their life insurance premiums. Liberty would just use whatever other measure to give discounts, like the ones that people in this thread attribute the difference in expected lifetimes to.

Instead Liberty wants to use Vitality Status even with the threat of being sued by Discovery for using their intellectual property.
Nope.. their models don’t account for “wellness” factor.. so using the assessment of another company (discovery, momentum) they achieve the same discount on their model.. which allows for a competitive pricing.

They could, at cost, make their own system whether for assessing minus rewards if need be I’m thinking they figured why reinvent the wheel if the member is already on those platforms.

Indirect use of the status is an interesting story so I am watching that case and I reckon discovery needs it in their favour.
 

SaiyanZ

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Nope.. their models don’t account for “wellness” factor.. so using the assessment of another company (discovery, momentum) they achieve the same discount on their model.. which allows for a competitive pricing.

They could, at cost, make their own system whether for assessing minus rewards if need be I’m thinking they figured why reinvent the wheel if the member is already on those platforms.

Indirect use of the status is an interesting story so I am watching that case and I reckon discovery needs it in their favour.
Well, according to several people in this thread, wellness factor is just a function of whether you can afford medical aid or have Vitality. So it should be very simple for Liberty to model as the data is readily available. No need for them to use Vitality Status if that is the case.
 

Swa

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If this wasn't true, Liberty, one of Discovery's biggest competitors, wouldn't be trying to use a persons Vitality Status to provide discounts on their life insurance premiums. Liberty would just use whatever other measure to give discounts, like the ones that people in this thread attribute the difference in expected lifetimes to.

Instead Liberty wants to use Vitality Status even with the threat of being sued by Discovery for using their intellectual property.

People can make assumptions but the life insurers have the actual data. Apparently if you are on Vitality and have the worst status (blue), then your life expectancy is worse than the average South African. So insured with medical aid is still bad if you lead a sedimentary lifestyle compared to someone without medical aid. Though Discovery won't dislcose stats like that as it doesn't give the message they want.
It's not about it not being true but rather false attribution. Being able to afford medical aid will itself get you a discount on life insurance. We also know it's not an exact science.
 

Mosgi

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Fairly simple assessment here. Looking at stats again you can see the strawman clearly. Correlation does not equate to causation.

How much money would one earn in a month to go onto Vitality? There is more than adequate evidence to suggest your LSM drives your expectancy. If you're wealthier you live longer, likely eat better, superior access to healthcare and more likely to go see a doctor for that weird pain, before its debilitating.
 

SaiyanZ

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Fairly simple assessment here. Looking at stats again you can see the strawman clearly. Correlation does not equate to causation.

How much money would one earn in a month to go onto Vitality? There is more than adequate evidence to suggest your LSM drives your expectancy. If you're wealthier you live longer, likely eat better, superior access to healthcare and more likely to go see a doctor for that weird pain, before its debilitating.
Like I said above, if you're wealthy and have medical aid and Vitality but also have the worst Vitality Status, your average life expectancy is worse than the average South African. So how do you explain away that? The above posters seem have missed that in my post as well.
 

Chris_the_Brit

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Probably one of the "smart" consultants who think Microsoft Excel is the pinnacle of statistical analysis. :sneaky:

Yet they get way better paid than me, a humble researcher who actually does stuff properly! :mad:

@Knyro
 
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SlinkyMike

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Lol. Its demographics. Wealthy people have a higher life expectancy. This moron is making a correlation/causality error, i.e.: wet roads cause rain. Actually I don't think it's an error at all - he just thinks we are dumb and he's probably right, statistically.
 

puddaphut

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Typical Discovery.

What utter nonsense. That being said, it’s complete unsurprising for this to come from Discovery: possibly one of (in my opinion) the most morally bereft companies in SA.
 

garp

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As the tired old saying goes, correlation does not imply causation. Obviously a program that, by definition, is comprised of high LSM, health conscious people with excellent medical cover will correlate with longevity. It's disingenuous to conclude that the program itself is entirely responsible for this.

That being said, over enough time if a program like Vitality converted enough people to a healthier lifestyle for a sustained period, then it would also obviously move the needle, but I doubt that Vitality has been around for long enough to produce a statistically significant conclusion.
 

Tharaxis

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When marketing gets hold of stats this is the kind of hogwash you end up with.

It's very obvious that this is a self selecting statistic. More affluent individuals can afford medical aid and the added (albeit small) cost of vitality. In general the life span of more affluent individuals is going to be higher than those who have lesser access to healthcare.

Does vitality encourage healthier behaviour? Yes, but I would argue that such a small percentage of overall vitality members make use of that aspect of it (instead of just getting cheaper gym memberships or movie tickets) that it has a minimal influence on those stats.
 

supersunbird

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Why Discovery Vitality members live much longer than normal South Africans

The average life expectancy in South Africa is 63, but it changes dramatically if you are a Discovery Vitality member.

This was revealed by Akash Dowra, head of technical marketing and client insights at Discovery Bank, who spoke at the 2019 BusinessTech FinTech Conference.
I wonder what it is for all other medical aid members vs Discovery Vitality members, that will tell us something. Not this nonsense.
 

puddaphut

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Like I said above, if you're wealthy and have medical aid and Vitality but also have the worst Vitality Status, your average life expectancy is worse than the average South African. So how do you explain away that? The above posters seem have missed that in my post as well.
When is bonus month for you guys?
 

supersunbird

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Like I said above, if you're wealthy and have medical aid and Vitality but also have the worst Vitality Status, your average life expectancy is worse than the average South African. So how do you explain away that? The above posters seem have missed that in my post as well.
Source?
 

Maciej

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This is statistical nonsense. Comparing a small number of people who are reasonably well off to the whole population of South Africa who can hardly afford the basics. Humbug.
 
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