Why you shouldn't turn off motion smoothing on your TV

Bradley Prior

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Why you shouldn't turn off motion smoothing on your TV

A coalition of film directors and actors have been encouraging people to turn off the frame interpolation feature on their TVs, and Tom Cruise recently released a video doing just that.

Frame interpolation is also known as motion smoothing, though TV manufacturers have different names for the feature. Samsung calls it “Auto Motion Plus” while LG refers to it as “TruMotion”.
 

Nobody Important

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I'd rather read a book in the dark with a flashlight than watch a movie in 60FPS, I watched The Hobbit in HFR and it was the worst.
I love it, I wish all content could be in 60fps. It's so smooth! Yes at first it was disconcerting when I watched The Hobbit but now I am used to it.
 

Tharaxis

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Yikes, I can't believe how misleading this article is. Motion smoothing OBJECTIVELY creates a worse looking and feeling look when applied towards film and TV shows and only really works okay with broadcast material (such as news, live events, etc.). The interpolated frames are always going to be inaccurate compared to to the real frames available and results in very obvious visual artifacts, especially in high-motion scenes. There's a reason why High Frame Rate started and died with The Hobbit, because it looked absolutely awful. Creating a simulated HFR video from content *never designed* with HFR in mind is always going to create an objectively worse looking end product.

Do not, for the love of God, enable motion smoothing on your TV, it 100% ruins the image.
 

ekske1

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I love it, I wish all content could be in 60fps. It's so smooth! Yes at first it was disconcerting when I watched The Hobbit but now I am used to it.
Especially anything animated. I watch all of my content via svp; so much so that its become quite natural. SVP isn't perfect but its better than those camera pans + stutter for one.
 

Soul Assassin

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Especially anything animated. I watch all of my content via svp; so much so that its become quite natural. SVP isn't perfect but its better than those camera pans + stutter for one.
It wouldn't stutter if your TV had a 24Hz film mode.
 

konfab

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Isn't it enough for cretins like Tom Cruise to tell people about their politics and morality?

Now I have to listen to their opinions on digital signal processing?

The real question to ask is what is the frequency content of the source material? And is it lower than the sample rate of the system you are viewing it on.

But we can't have that type of discussion as math and science are constructs of the Western Imperialistic patriarchy and thus oppress woman and black people. OrangeManBad.exe
 

Polymathic

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Can't stand simulated high frame rate content, there's always a few frames off and that takes me out of whatever I'm watching.
 

Praeses

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Looks terrible. Just start releasing all new content at 60fps already.
 

mypetcow

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Phase Alternating Line
(PAL) is a colour encoding system for analogue television used in broadcast television systems in most countries broadcasting at 625-line / 50 field (25 frame) per second (576i).
Thanks Wikipedia.

Unless we are all watching movies with our bunny ears antenna or on DVD with RCA output (yellow plug), I’m not sure this article is relevant to TVs made in the past few years. :laugh:

HD TVs use 720p or 1080p or 4K so there is nothing analog about their picture. If you’re connecting something with HDMI it’s a digital picture so no PAL anymore.

If you’ve ever watched DSTV it’s in the name...Digital Satellite TV...

Netflix is digital too...

I think the author of this article is a time traveler form 1998 and hasn’t brushed up on current TV standards. :ROFL:
 

Lupus

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Thanks Wikipedia.

Unless we are all watching movies with our bunny ears antenna or on DVD with RCA output (yellow plug), I’m not sure this article is relevant to TVs made in the past few years.

HD TVs use 720p or 1080p or 4K so there is nothing analog about their picture. If you’re connecting something with HDMI it’s a digital picture so no PAL anymore.

If you’ve ever watched DSTV it’s in the name...Digital Satellite TV...

Netflix is digital too...

I think the author of this article is a time traveler form 1998 and hasn’t brushed up on current TV standards. :ROFL:
What are you on about? Frame rate is still the same on digital as it is on the old analogue.
Film and series are still done at 24 to 25fps in PAL countries, while in the US it's almost 30.
Motion smoothing is supposed to interpolate the "missing" frames.
 

Soul Assassin

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What are you on about? Frame rate is still the same on digital as it is on the old analogue.
Film and series are still done at 24 to 25fps in PAL countries, while in the US it's almost 30.
Motion smoothing is supposed to interpolate the "missing" frames.
What do you mean in the US it's almost 30?
 

SauRoNZA

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Content should be presented exactly as per the original source wherever possible.

If that was 24fps then so be it. If it was 60fps then play it as such.

Never ever should content be bullshitted to 60fps or worse 120fps.

Try play some games with motion smoothing on and see how far you get.
 

SauRoNZA

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What are you on about? Frame rate is still the same on digital as it is on the old analogue.
Film and series are still done at 24 to 25fps in PAL countries, while in the US it's almost 30.
Motion smoothing is supposed to interpolate the "missing" frames.
The sources are the same in most cases but modern tv panels are 60hz and therefore need to be compensated for this as only top end models can natively support 24hz.

So there aren’t actually any missing frames. There are fake frames added, normally using half frames of real frames to make up for it, which is why it’s not at all true to the source.

HD sources (Blu-ray etc) the 50hz factor generally doesn’t apply any more and it’s usually 1080p60.
 
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