WikiLeaks to release video of civilians, journalists being murdered in airstrike

d0b33

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Whistleblower Web site WikiLeaks is planning to release a video that reveals what it's calling a Pentagon "cover-up" of an incident in which numerous civilians and journalists were murdered in an airstrike, according to a recent media advisory.

The video will be released on April 5 at the National Press Club, the group said.

They also noted their members have recently been tailed by individuals under State Department diplomatic immunity, and that "one related person was detained for 22 hours" while authorities seized computer equipment.

In a video released Friday, a Russia Today broadcast discusses the pending release of the video WikiLeaks first announced in a tweet on Feb. 20, 2010, which read: "Finally cracked the encryption to US military video in which journalists, among others, are shot. Thanks to all who donated $/CPUs."

A follow-up on March 22 announced their reveal date.

"Over the last few years, WikiLeaks has been the subject of hostile acts by security organizations," founder Julian Assange writes. "We've become used to the level of security service interest in us and have established procedures to ignore that interest. But the increase in surveillance activities this last month, in a time when we are barely publishing due to fundraising, are excessive."

On Tuesday evening, followers of the WikiLeaks Twitter feed were startled to read, "WikiLeaks is currently under an aggressive US and Icelandic surveillance operation." This was followed a few minutes later by "If anything happens to us, you know why: it is our Apr 5 film. And you know who is responsible." A succeeding message warned, "We have airline records of the State Dep/CIA tails. Don't think you can get away with it. You cannot. This is WikiLeaks."

The site also recently published a document by a CIA think tank that proposes how European public opinion on the Afghan war could be manipulated.

"The need for independent leaks and whistle-blowing exposures is particularly acute now because, at exactly the same time that investigative journalism has collapsed, public and private efforts to manipulate public opinion have proliferated," Glenn Greenwald wrote in a recent piece about how the United States and other governments plot to destroy WikiLeaks. " This is exemplified by the type of public opinion management campaign detailed by the above-referenced CIA Report, the Pentagon's TV propaganda program exposed in 2008, and the ways in which private interests covertly pay and control supposedly "independent political commentators" to participate in our public debates and shape public opinion."

This video was published to YouTube on March 26, 2010, clipped from Russia Today.
link

Update:
Released -
http://collateralmurder.com/
 
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Praeses

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I hope they have lots of backups of the coming video, just in case something happens!
 

dj_jyno

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Well, I don't think they need too many backups. Once this video gets out in the wild, the American government won't be able to stop it from spreading.
 

Praeses

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Well, I don't think they need too many backups. Once this video gets out in the wild, the American government won't be able to stop it from spreading.

But before they release it, they need to make sure that they can release it without it going missing :p
 

Palimino

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On Tuesday evening, followers of the WikiLeaks Twitter feed were startled to read, "WikiLeaks is currently under an aggressive US and Icelandic surveillance operation.

Paraphrased from other posts.
Was there hostile or intimidatory intent? Iceland has been making a huge hoo-ha recently about ‘freedom of the press’ to the extent where they are putting legislation in place to ‘legally’ protect any whistle blowing entity registered [incorporated] in Iceland. This was welcomed by (Sri-Lankan, Iranian, etc.) journalists. Besides, why would they do this? What advantage accrues to Iceland? It is a small player (less than 1 000 000 people) on the world stage. In the TV explanation about Iceland’s proposed legislation (as the Wikileaks founder [< note] explained it), it is not simply legal protection that Iceland offers.

The TV program is a media program called ‘Listening Post’ (once a week) and it can be found at the site Aljazeera.net/English.

Iceland is a first-world country with a myriad of fast Internet links to different countries (hubs) which cannot all be monitored. To implicate Iceland, the ‘surveillance’ must have been reported out of context because it has the flavour of a hostile act. Iceland does not have a history of manipulative scumbucketry and is surrounded by countries of a similar character Because Iceland has a small population and a low profile internationally, conflicts of interest would be minimized (they are unlikely to indulge in the acts which Wikileaks specializes in uncovering). The key would be for organizations like Wikileaks to incorporate in Iceland and base their servers there. They [the servers] would be virtually bullet-proof against seizure or gagging and volatile information would be preserved (a service for the storage of incriminating data is also offered) no matter how many mirror sites might be compromised. There are wheels within wheels concerning the article. Wikileaks reports Icelandic surveillance. There’s something very dodgy about this claim.

I think its kinda noble of Iceland. It’s nothing of the kind of course (fluke) – they are emerging from bankruptacy and are casting about for a way to re-establish the moral high ground after defaulting on debts to the UK and Holland. If they can establish a safe haven for whistle blowers, they may well gain it IMO.
 

MidnightWizard

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Trojan Horse

Iceland has been making a huge hoo-ha recently about ‘freedom of the press’ to the extent where they are putting legislation in place to ‘legally’ protect any whistle blowing entity registered [incorporated] in Iceland.

Iceland is a first-world country with a myriad of fast Internet links.

they are emerging from bankruptacy and are casting about for a way to re-establish the moral high ground after defaulting on debts to the UK and Holland. If they can establish a safe haven for whistle blowers, they may well gain it IMO.


PA-LEAZE

Iceland is bust -- broke -- bankrupt -- NOT first World but Turd World.

ie in a VERY vulnerable position to -- "people with LOTS of money" ( read America CIA NSA etc etc )

As the old adage goes -- he who pays the piper calls the tune

HOW did they manage to pay off their debts to the EU -- WITHOUT any money :confused:

I would stay away from this as far as I could.


MW
 

Ancalagon

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Wikileaks is exactly the kind of organisation that the modern world needs - a place where the truth that governments are so keen to hide can be laid bare for all to see. I hope that the USA has to answer some very uncomfortable questions on the upcoming leak.
 

d0b33

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Wikileaks is exactly the kind of organisation that the modern world needs - a place where the truth that governments are so keen to hide can be laid bare for all to see. I hope that the USA has to answer some very uncomfortable questions on the upcoming leak.

Exactly, so have you donated? :D
 

d0b33

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I donated I think 2 dollars a while back when they were about to go down(it must of helped :D), will donate if the video is good... lol I want to get what I pay for...
 

Palimino

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HOW did they manage to pay off their debts to the EU -- WITHOUT any money :confused:

They didn’t. When Iceland went tits up, investors from different countries lost money. Their governments (mainly UK and Holland) paid-off the investors. The **governments** agitated for Iceland (insensitively IMO) to pay them the debt incurred. It’s all quite legitimate and terribly important that the ‘law of contract’ is honoured among countries (where the buck stops). Iceland was in an invidious position. They held a referendum – pay-off the debts or pull themselves out the dwang. They chose to pull themselves out the dwang and default on the debt (which they intend to pay, just not in the timeframe which suits their creditors).

Put it on a personal level. You have a choice between feeding your family or paying-off a legitimate debt. Most people would choose to feed their family. So did Iceland.
 

Palimino

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What is Iceland going to do? Honestly?

Honestly? I haven’t a clue. I just highlighted the apparent contradiction between Iceland’s plans (Listening Post - Aljazeera.net/English) pushed by the Wikileaks founder and Wikileak’s current behaviour. The reasons for Iceland doing this are not implausible and I have found the Listening Post (aside from ME stuff) to be credible. Besides, it was the Wikileaks chap talking at some length, unprompted and on his own turf. Anyway, he is no fool and presumably quite courageous to be involved with Wikileaks. Not likely to be intimidated (a very unwussy type). There is a spanner in the works is my laborious analysis. I have tentatively come down on Iceland’s side but Wikileaks also has a credible reputation. I am confounded and confused.
 

d0b33

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Here is the official military statement reported back then in NYtimes, clear disinformation.
The American military said in a statement late Thursday that 11 people had been killed: nine insurgents and two civilians. According to the statement, American troops were conducting a raid when they were hit by small-arms fire and rocket-propelled grenades. The American troops called in reinforcements and attack helicopters. In the ensuing fight, the statement said, the two Reuters employees and nine insurgents were killed.

“There is no question that coalition forces were clearly engaged in combat operations against a hostile force,” said Lt. Col. Scott Bleichwehl, a spokesman for the multinational forces in Baghdad.

The military command offered condolences to the families of the civilians who were killed during the combat action, the statement said.
 
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