WISP Quality/Service

Rex

Member
Joined
Sep 12, 2004
Messages
11
All the legal arguments re WISPS may be irrelevant if they cannot provide a reliable, quality service at a reasonable price. They will never attract the large customer base they need to maintain a good network. To date all wireless providers have had problems with speed, bandwidth, reliability and customer service. Some of these problems have been extreme and they admit it. If this continues they will lose customers and the entire technology will get a bad name(if it hasn't already). My experience with Uninet, and reading the forum about Sentech bears this out.
The average user is not tachnically proficient, they just want a service that works - many of the WISPS appear to be 'backyard operators' that will not be around for long.
Ideas on how the situation can be improved and comments on the quality of service you have received?
 

guest2013-1

guest
Joined
Aug 22, 2003
Messages
19,809
This is only what I've thought about improving services between WISPs, Quality of services (sentech) sucks ass... so here goes...

This is my opinion, Megawan stirred interest in other people who wanted to start their own business. There IS big money in something like this, but people, more too often, rush into things before thinking things through. This leads to downtime or ineffecient bandwidth.

Here is what I would do. Get ex-Megawan employees in as consultants (or hire them even) Megawan, to me, made ground breaking strides as a WISP, and they learnt alot of things and made alot of mistakes, information which can be invaluable to any WISP.

Another thing I would do, is collaborate with other WISP's. If I were "noone's WISP.com/jouma" I would try and deal with the other WISP's out there, and ask them to link up via my towers or something. That way I increase my footprint with less cost to me (and vica versa) rolling out much faster and cutting down on maintanence costs.

Hell, the collaboration could become a thing where all WISPS come together and buy bandwidth in bulk, allocate chunks of bandwidth to each WISP and manage it at a central point. Now you have a highly franschise-able oppertunity where Mr.x can put up a few towers in places not covered, link through the existing towers (increasing his footprint and potential customer base) AND receive affordable bandwidth. Then selling connections like there is no tomorrow. Looking only after his towers, and not having to worry about bandwidth costs etc.

This would be ideal situation. Because then you have, say, 5 independant wisp's using the same backbone, working in unicen instead of against each other, providing the best service for their clients because they have the buying power re: bandwidth and it's not up to only one WISP to setup towers, thus less money to roll out new towers.

They can even go as far as charge each wisp owner a monthly "rent" for towers that is not his which some of his clients connects to. That rent money can then be put in a pool to buy more bandwidth or even put up new towers.

If you can think of a good example, Steers and Debonairs. They both started out as independant shops and is now owned by a big company (Steers ltd if i'm not mistaken) All their raw materials are made and distrobuted by the company, but each shop is owned and run by independant people.

They have to buy the raw materials from Steers Ltd (and pay initial franshising fee's) but they take home all the profits at the end of the day. Steers Ltd in turn makes profit on the raw materials they sell to their franshisee's.

See my point? In south africa, unfortunatly, there is ALOT of people who want to do their own thing and f@ck the rest. a very good example on THAT would be the number of political parties and churches in this country. There was a joke once, "What do 3 south african's do on a deserted island? Start 5 political parties and 23 churches"

<font size="1">
Selling my soul to Telkom for better internet speeds.

Person Me = New Person();
while (Me.Alive)
{
try
{
Me.Drink(Alcohol.Any);
}
catch (HeaveException h)
{
Me.PrayToCeramicGod();
Me.Promise("Never again");
}
}
Me.Dispose();
</font id="size1">
 

John

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2003
Messages
124
Nope the Wisps will never come together. It is a valid point that all most people want
is a stable and cheap Internet connection they don't care how it is done.
Doing this wirelessly is very difficult and not
using Locustworld technology virtually impossible. In the opensource model people like Kieran
Murphy etc. will have oppertunity to make money, but we as end users are not tied in. We
only pay for the mesh to be maintained. Kieran is not going to make a profit, he is going
to be paid a salary. I believe that many wisps networks are being sabotaged by their
competitors, since it is so easy to do.
Remember we have in practice zero regulation. If you jam Telkom's highsite, there
is very little anybody could do about it.

In the end the only way you are going to get cheap stable access is to fork out
R8000 x 12 = R 96 000 for a Telkom leased line and share this line with 10 - 20 people
in your immediate vicinity via Linksys WRT54G wi-fi Routers. No complicated Locust meshboxes,
just strait forward vanilla ACcess Point deployment. Works out to R400 per month for 20 users.


http://sawireless.tripod.com
 

guest2013-1

guest
Joined
Aug 22, 2003
Messages
19,809
no, you need 20*12 people to cover the cost of 96000 @ 400 bucks

but yea...greed

<font size="1">
Selling my soul to Telkom for better internet speeds.

Person Me = New Person();
while (Me.Alive)
{
try
{
Me.Drink(Alcohol.Any);
}
catch (HeaveException h)
{
Me.PrayToCeramicGod();
Me.Promise("Never again");
}
}
Me.Dispose();
</font id="size1">
 

Spamtheman

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2004
Messages
572
The only tricky thing about hiring an ex megawan employee is getting them to touch commercial wireless with a barge pole :)
 
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