Woolworths stores targeted by explosive devices in Durban

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#81
Now Woolworths is becoming like Boxer and Chinese-run stores :D Oh no, wait, seems they'll be searching incoming customers.
 
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Suspect99

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#83
I always felt woolies was too lax with security. When I pass my bags from another store to the security to seal, they smirk at me and say" this is Woolworths we don't do that here". It's kinda biting them on the ass now
 

RedViking

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#84
Here at Pavilion now. Woolies scanning every person and bags going in...... Eish. All I hear is beep beep beep..... Not sure how that helps.
 
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isie

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#85
I always felt woolies was too lax with security. When I pass my bags from another store to the security to seal, they smirk at me and say" this is Woolworths we don't do that here". It's kinda biting them on the ass now
on the other end a lot of people get insulted that they seal or check packets
 

schumi

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#88
Police in uniform must be searched at Woolworths, says KZN’s top cop

DURBAN - The KwaZulu-Natal top cop has spoken, police officers must abide and be searched at Woolworths stores in the province amid threats at the store with incendiary devices in recent weeks.

The province’s top cop said police officers in uniform should not be shopping in the first place, and has called on commanders to enforce police orders.

Police officers had bemoaned that they had to be searched at local stores amid a policy by the store that all customers be searched before entering the store.

One police officer described the searching of officers as “totally unacceptable”.

In a Daily News article published on Wednesday, national police spokesperson Brigadier Vishnu Naidoo said when asked about police being searched at the Woolies stores: “If this is happening, I’m saying it shouldn’t happen - not in a public area. If they want to insist on the police officer being searched, the police officer can refuse”.
More at: https://www.iol.co.za/dailynews/new...ched-at-woolworths-says-kzns-top-cop-16476730
 

The_Mowgs

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#91
That is ridiculous and actually a spit in the face of serving officers. I don't think it's technicly legal either outside of another armed forces branch doing the search.
Why is it a spit in their faces? With the amount of fake uniforms etc in SA being used to rob people I find it perfectly acceptable.

If this was somewhere in Norway etc I would agree with you.
 

Kosmik

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#92
Why is it a spit in their faces? With the amount of fake uniforms etc in SA being used to rob people I find it perfectly acceptable.

If this was somewhere in Norway etc I would agree with you.
Because you are having a non law enforcement officer search another which means he allows someone close enough to actually take their weapon or disarm them. I hear you regarding false uniforms but this opens another kettle of fish.
 

IzZzy

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#93
Because you are having a non law enforcement officer search another which means he allows someone close enough to actually take their weapon or disarm them. I hear you regarding false uniforms but this opens another kettle of fish.
Right of admission reserved through. It’s private property and absent any crime, if the police want access, they’d have to comply.
 

The_Mowgs

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#94
Because you are having a non law enforcement officer search another which means he allows someone close enough to actually take their weapon or disarm them. I hear you regarding false uniforms but this opens another kettle of fish.
As in the security guard disarms the police officer?
 

ToxicBunny

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#95
Because you are having a non law enforcement officer search another which means he allows someone close enough to actually take their weapon or disarm them. I hear you regarding false uniforms but this opens another kettle of fish.
As Izzy said, private property and right of admission reserved, so if they are coming in without a crime being committed then the owner has the legal right to impose a search restriction on them. If they don't like it they than can shop elsewhere.
 

Kosmik

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#96
As Izzy said, private property and right of admission reserved, so if they are coming in without a crime being committed then the owner has the legal right to impose a search restriction on them. If they don't like it they than can shop elsewhere.
What is the point of the search restriction though? This country has open carry laws and policemen are always visibly armed, a search is not going to tell you anything or prevent anything. And I'm questioning that legal right as there are a number of very strong policies about an officer being put in the position of "vulnerability" if you follow. Certainly they can be denied entry , as is the owners right but there are restrictions to right of admission and around law enforcement can be one of them. Not that it gives an officer carte blanche, I'm just saying its a very fine line.
 

ToxicBunny

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#97
What is the point of the search restriction though? This country has open carry laws and policemen are always visibly armed, a search is not going to tell you anything or prevent anything. And I'm questioning that legal right as there are a number of very strong policies about an officer being put in the position of "vulnerability" if you follow. Certainly they can be denied entry , as is the owners right but there are restrictions to right of admission and around law enforcement can be one of them. Not that it gives an officer carte blanche, I'm just saying its a very fine line.
Yeah of course, they can't refuse the officer entry if the officer is responding to a crime or something of that sort... but its not handguns that are their worry, its explosives in my opinion....

Also, I would assume an officer to have their service weapon on them... but if I searched them and found other weapons it would be a worry would it not?
 

Kosmik

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#98
Yeah of course, they can't refuse the officer entry if the officer is responding to a crime or something of that sort... but its not handguns that are their worry, its explosives in my opinion....

Also, I would assume an officer to have their service weapon on them... but if I searched them and found other weapons it would be a worry would it not?
Quite a few can carry additional, not to mention depending have some other gear ( teargas etc which may contain some form of charge ). Look , one could very easily manufacture a small device ( NO, I will not specify how , don't be stupid! ) that would even pass a search, for the simple fact in how it is disguised as a standard every day carry item. I'm not talking about the responding to a crime or entry, my concern is the huge onus placed on officers around the responsibility of what they carry.

Give you an example, if they keep any weapons at home, it has to both adhere to normal gun laws as well as some more stringent requirements, especially if they are automatic. Even if adhering to those rules, the weapons are still stolen, the officer is generally in very very deep **** and undergoes a massive investigation.

In a previous life, many many many years ago, I was a child who grew up in a typical Portuguese tearoom shop and we never, suspected or prevented having police around, in fact it was encouraged and the local precinct used to actually shop with us quite often and we went through lengths to make them welcome. Not to say we never kept a gun under the counter but they always had our backs and we had a number of situations over the years. Sure, times have changed but I think it's a tricky line to walk and not one I would encourage from either the store owners perspective OR a person in charge of the officers.
 

TysonRoux

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#99
Give you an example, if they keep any weapons at home, it has to both adhere to normal gun laws as well as some more stringent requirements, especially if they are automatic. Even if adhering to those rules, the weapons are still stolen, the officer is generally [should be] in very very deep **** and undergoes a massive investigation.
And that generally doesn't happen here.
 
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