World of WarCraft, StarCraft, Diablo network peering in SA

whatwhat

Executive Member
Joined
Jun 1, 2009
Messages
5,937
Still not going to get away from the fact that we are halfway across the planet from their servers.
 

Baxteen

Honorary Master
Joined
Feb 26, 2013
Messages
17,268
first step towards a African hosting site.
sure there are not really enough players to warrant it, but this is part of the problem with the EU servers.
but maybe just maybe this may lead to a world where say, Africa has its own server and we are not seen as part of EU.
 

Qrox

Expert Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2008
Messages
1,365
first step towards a African hosting site.
sure there are not really enough players to warrant it, but this is part of the problem with the EU servers.
but maybe just maybe this may lead to a world where say, Africa has its own server and we are not seen as part of EU.
Thought the same thing quite some years ago, but these days I doubt that something like that will happen here. The peering thing, sure, there's a chance, but getting a server here is extremely unlikely.
Even if there is a server here, for existing games like wow, I doubt that many people would want to switch to the SA one.
 

Akasha

Executive Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2014
Messages
7,917
Thought the same thing quite some years ago, but these days I doubt that something like that will happen here. The peering thing, sure, there's a chance, but getting a server here is extremely unlikely.
Even if there is a server here, for existing games like wow, I doubt that many people would want to switch to the SA one.
Especially WoW players methinks. Fair enough if you're in an SA guild and all your players can connect to that server. But as it is, SA players are pretty scattered and won't move to another server if they decide to make one
 

GedMarc

Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2012
Messages
12
It will actually reduce latency...

Peering involves two networks coming together to exchange traffic with each other freely, and for mutual benefit. This 'mutual benefit' is most often the motivation behind peering, which is often described solely by "reduced costs for transit services". Other less tangible motivations can include:

Increased redundancy (by reducing dependence on one or more transit providers).
Increased capacity for extremely large amounts of traffic (distributing traffic across many networks).
Increased routing control over your traffic.
Improved performance (attempting to bypass potential bottlenecks with a "direct" path).
Improved perception of your network (being able to claim a "higher tier").
Ease of requesting for emergency aid (from friendly peers).
 
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