Would you kill baby Hitler?

kolaval

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The Germans faith was sealed at Stalingrad, around 300,000 casualties many of them their most experienced troops. Follow that with the battles of Moscow and Kursk. If D-Day landed failed it just would of meant more Soviet losses but they still would of defeated the Nazis
You still ignore the fact that the war had been raging on for a while before that.
The allies did not appear out of the blue on D-Day. Russia was not fighting the Germans alone.
 

Polymathic

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You still ignore the fact that the war had been raging on for a while before that.
The allies did not appear out of the blue on D-Day. Russia was not fighting the Germans alone.
The point I'm making there was absolutely no way the Germans could ever successfully invade the Soviet Union, it was a war they were always going to lose due the vast size , population and Stalin's scorched Earth tactics. Eventually their supply lines will be stretch too thin and eventually collapse. Stalin would eventually of taken Germany even if it took 2/3 of the Soviet Population to do so.
 

thestaggy

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The point I'm making there was absolutely no way the Germans could ever successfully invade the Soviet Union, it was a war they were always going to lose due the vast size , population and Stalin's scorched Earth tactics. Eventually their supply lines will be stretch too thin and eventually collapse. Stalin would eventually of taken Germany even if it took 2/3 of the Soviet Population to do so.
Would the Soviets have held on between 1942 - 1943 without Lend-Lease? The numbers;

238 million kg of frozen beef and pork, 218 million kg of canned meats (including 75 million kg of stew), 33 million kg of sausages and bacon, 1,089 million kg of chicken meat, 110 million kg of egg powder, 359 million kg of vegetable oil and margarine, 99 million kg of butter, 36 million kg of cheese 72 million kg of milk powder
Some foods have played a huge role for recovering soldiers, the number of which reached 22 million people during war
Now it is impossible to accurately estimate the role of food supplies from the United States Britain and Canada in the defeat of the armies of Nazi, but it is clear that this aid has played a significant role in achieving victory over the common enemy.
Keep in mind that Germany occupied much of the USSR'S agricultural land (notably Ukraine) and along with the Soviet's own scorched earth policy, it highlights the importance of food shipments.

...in the words of Joseph Stalin to Harry Hopkins, personal representative of the U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, in August 1941: «Give us aluminum in the right quantity, and we will be able to fight for another four years.»
Thus, in view of this situation, we can conclude that Lend-Lease provided substantial assistance to the Soviet Union. To a large extent, the country managed to organize the work of its aviation industry thanks to the aid.

According to Soviet specialists, the total supply of aluminum from the United States, Britain and Canada under Lend-lease during the war amounted to 301 tons, and its total production in the USSR over the same period, including silumin – to 350.9 tons.
The Western Allies supplied 46% of the aluminium utilised by the Soviets in their war effort.

According to the post-war statistics, the production of copper during the war amounted to 534 tons. Lend-lease from the United States is estimated at 404 tons, or at 76% of production in the Soviet Union. Moreover, copper deficiency in our country decreased largely due to the imports of communications equipment from the United States. For example, the USSR received 956.7 thousand miles of field telephone cable, 2.1 thousand miles of marine cable and 1.1 thousand miles of underwater cable. A lot of radio stations, receivers and radars, produced from copper, were also stationed.
During the war, 622 thousand tons of rails were delivered under LendLease. This represents about 56.5% of the total domestic production of rails from mid-1941 to the end of 1945
Armor steel had a special place in these shipments, especially in the production of tanks, self-propelled guns and other equipment. Mobilization reserve of armored steel in the Soviet Union before the war was small and did not cover even 6-month industry needs. According to some data, 525.4 thousand tons of rolled steel of all types was delivered to the USSR under Lend-Lease. Every month, the country received about half of average amount of Soviet production of armored steel
All those T-34s being churned out, reliant to a large degree on western metals.

After Stalingrad, the Nazis systematically destroyed the Soviet railroad tracks, transport equipment, locomotives. The products of Soviet enterprises could not make up for the resulting loss. By November 1944, we provided the USSR with 1,045 locomotives, 7,164 wagons, 1,000 loading platforms and 100 tanks. The number of supplies peaked in November 1944: only during this month we delivered 1,367 cars to the USSR. The problem of replacing rails was one of the major. By November 1944, the USSR was supplied with 2,120,000 tons of steel, of which 478,000 tons were allocated for rails replacement, and 110,000 tons of railway wheels and axles. We have also supplied 253 tons of aluminum, 314 tons of brass and 65 tons of other metals containing copper
https://histrf.ru/uploads/media/default/0001/12/df78d3da0fe55d965333035cd9d4ee2770550653.pdf

Manpower can only take you so far. You still need to feed it and give it the equipment to fight. Defeating Germany required a joint effort. Nobody would've beaten them on their own. The Western Allies didn't have enough bodies and the Soviets would've run out of the necessary resources to keep fighting.

And as for manpower, by 1944 the USSR had depleted its core Russian, Ukranian and Belorussian manpower pools. The bulk of late-war conscripts started coming from Central Asia and occupied Eastern Europe. Depending on source, 68 - 80% of Soviet males born in 1923 (conscription age in 1941) did not survive the war. There was no way the USSR would sustain its losses for another 2+ years at its current rate of losses.
 
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