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You need city permission before using your flat as an Airbnb in Cape Town

Joined
Jan 7, 2010
Messages
41,151
#6
Cape Town becoming more and more "nanny state" by the day.
Nope, they just want more money from you.

“In terms of municipal planning by-laws, a block of flats cannot be used for holiday accommodation or hotel purposes,” said Herron.

“Any owner wishing to do short-term holiday letting from a block of flats, irrespective of the platform facilitating such letting – such as Airbnb or otherwise – must ensure the property is appropriately zoned, and must apply for consent from the city’s development management department.”
 

AlmightyBender

Expert Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2012
Messages
3,141
#9
Looking at the pic, the people protesting about airbnb, what is their grief?
1) Cape Town has finite number of dwellings/properties (can't just expand cause of mountain and sea etc)
2) Investors start buying properties to short term let i.e. airbnb
3) Number of properties available to actually live in decline
4) Thus demand > supply thus prices increase
???????
5) People who actually live and work in this city no longer can afford to do so

My take on this as one of those affected (I cannot afford anything decent even with a well paying job) is that it is pretty evil. Yes the rich who already have wealth and are able to get into the market do very well. Tourism booms and those businesses do very well. All brilliant. The price though is you literally dislocate families and people who have a history and culture and make Cape Town, well Cape Town. It becomes a form of forced removal. If you think that is ok then cool. I personally do not.

EDIT: not directing that at you personally :) you are a pretty reasonable guy, rather speaking to the debate overall
 
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C4Cat

Executive Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2015
Messages
6,552
#10
Looking at the pic, the people protesting about airbnb, what is their grief?
Pushes the prices up so local south africans can no longer afford to rent in these areas. Try renting a bachelor flat in the cbd area or sea point for under R10000 a month, for example. Airbnb plays a big role here because people start renting out per day rather than per month. Anyone who actually wants to live in these areas needs to be pretty wealthy (relative to the population)
 

Emjay

Expert Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2005
Messages
3,440
#11
1) Cape Town has finite number of dwellings/properties (can't just expand cause of mountain and sea etc)
2) Investors start buying properties to short term let i.e. airbnb
3) Number of properties available to actually live in decline
4) Thus demand > supply thus prices increase
???????
5) People who actually live and work in this city no longer can afford to do so

My take on this as one of those affected (I cannot afford anything decent even with a well paying job) is that it is pretty evil. Yes the rich who already have wealth and are able to get into the market do very well. Tourism booms and those businesses do very well. All brilliant. The price though is you literally dislocate families and people who have a history and culture and make Cape Town, well Cape Town. It becomes a form of forced removal. If you think that is ok then cool. I personally do not.

EDIT: not directing that at you personally :) you are a pretty reasonable guy, rather speaking to the debate overall
That's my take on it as well. Because properties are so affordable here from an international perspective, the issue is only going to get worse. Feel for those who cannot afford to buy any properties there. Now, it's almost impossible imo.
 

The_Librarian

Another MyBB
Super Moderator
Joined
Nov 20, 2015
Messages
17,816
#12
Waiting for the day when the whole of Cape Town is owned by foreign investors, and is milking every person in Cape Town for rent.
Businesses included.
 

Temujin

Expert Member
Joined
Apr 18, 2015
Messages
3,307
#13
Hmmm... assuming properties close to airports would be rented more frequently(overnight stays etc)... good time to invest in properties boksburg side *strokes beard*
 

Nick333

Honorary Master
Joined
Nov 17, 2005
Messages
28,655
#14
That's my take on it as well. Because properties are so affordable here from an international perspective, the issue is only going to get worse. Feel for those who cannot afford to buy any properties there. Now, it's almost impossible imo.
There will always be areas that people can't afford to buy. This leads to the development of areas where they can. This is growth and progress. This happens regardless of the existence of Airbnb.

Besides which the scope for short term rentals is limited. It will reach saturation soon enough.
 

supersunbird

Honorary Master
Joined
Oct 1, 2005
Messages
43,542
#15
1) Cape Town has finite number of dwellings/properties (can't just expand cause of mountain and sea etc)
2) Investors start buying properties to short term let i.e. airbnb
3) Number of properties available to actually live in decline
4) Thus demand > supply thus prices increase
???????
5) People who actually live and work in this city no longer can afford to do so

My take on this as one of those affected (I cannot afford anything decent even with a well paying job) is that it is pretty evil. Yes the rich who already have wealth and are able to get into the market do very well. Tourism booms and those businesses do very well. All brilliant. The price though is you literally dislocate families and people who have a history and culture and make Cape Town, well Cape Town. It becomes a form of forced removal. If you think that is ok then cool. I personally do not.

EDIT: not directing that at you personally :) you are a pretty reasonable guy, rather speaking to the debate overall
Don't worry, I understood that.

Mmmm, I wonder if it is a bubble that will inflate enough to burst. Where are all the people coming from that can afford the high prices? At some stage there will be market saturation.
 

Emjay

Expert Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2005
Messages
3,440
#16
There will always be areas that people can't afford to buy. This leads to the development of areas where they can. This is growth and progress. This happens regardless of the existence of Airbnb.

Besides which the scope for short term rentals is limited. It will reach saturation soon enough.
Agree with you, but it irks me when foreigners are taking that rental income offshore, when it used to go to hotels. At least some of that money will go back into taxes.

Unless my perception of foreign ownership land ownership in Cape Town is incorrect?
 

Nick333

Honorary Master
Joined
Nov 17, 2005
Messages
28,655
#17
Agree with you, but it irks me when foreigners are taking that rental income offshore, when it used to go to hotels. At least some of that money will go back into taxes.

Unless my perception of foreign ownership land ownership in Cape Town is incorrect?
I have no idea myself, but how much of Sun International is locally owned? I'm pretty sure Radisson isn't local. How much of the money that used to go to hotels is staying local anyway is my point.

I can think of 3 bnbs in PE that are foreign owned. And 1 holiday home that I know of and it's not like I'm all that knowledgeable about that industry.

Good investment opportunities will attract foreign investors. Granted Airbnb makes it a bit easier for foreigners to invest in the SA accommodation industry, but not, I suspect, that much easier.
 

access

Executive Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2009
Messages
6,765
#18
cape town has always been more expensive, long before airbnb.

I wonder, how much do the people that complain about high prices feel they should pay to live in these expensive zones.

I would like to compare their "feelings" to whats available in the suburbs.


hmm have people spend holiday money with airbnb while travelling, or have people spend far less because they are trying to make a living and rent or buy above their means.
 

Emjay

Expert Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2005
Messages
3,440
#19
I have no idea myself, but how much of Sun International is locally owned? I'm pretty sure Radisson isn't local. How much of the money that used to go to hotels is staying local anyway is my point.
Most major hotel chains are owned by foreign companies. They will still however pay taxes.

The whole rise of Airbnb has been very interesting and an example of true disruptive technology. We will just need to learn to adapt to it. But, as was mentioned, the market will saturate soon, and balance will be restored again.
 

Nick333

Honorary Master
Joined
Nov 17, 2005
Messages
28,655
#20
Most major hotel chains are owned by foreign companies. They will still however pay taxes.

The whole rise of Airbnb has been very interesting and an example of true disruptive technology. We will just need to learn to adapt to it. But, as was mentioned, the market will saturate soon, and balance will be restored again.
Ja, taxation is always a problem when money changes hands online. Unfortunately the people who would be able to implement a workable solution have no interest in making it easier to pay taxes.
 
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