South African cellphone shops fail inspections

Icasa has announced the outcome of its inspection of retail outlets of Electronic Communications Services licensees.

Icasa said it focussed on the major mobile network operators in South Africa.

“The Regulations prescribe guidelines on the standard of conduct to be adhered to by licensees in their interactions with consumers and set out the rights of consumers in the electronic communications sector,” said Icasa.

It inspected 162 retail outlets across South Africa, with the following distribution:

  • 30% – Vodacom
  • 26% – MTN
  • 17% – Cell C
  • 9% – Telkom
  • 18% – other licensees

Icasa summarised its findings as follows:

Icasa retail outlet overall compliance

MTN had the highest overall levels of non-compliance at 84%, followed by Cell C at 79%, and Vodacom at 69%.

The licensee with the lowest percentage of non-compliance was Telkom – 64%.

Icasa said areas of non-compliance were: visibility of the Code of Conduct, availability and visibility of the consumer complaints process, and availability of the Code of Conduct in English and one or more official languages.

“The Authority views the level of non-compliance in a serious light and has issued an instruction to all licensees to remedy areas of non-compliance by 30 June 2016.”

“Failure to do so will result in the institution of enforcement action.”

Visibility of the Code of Conduct

Icasa retail outlet code of conduct display compliance

Availability and visibility of the consumer complaints process

Icasa retail outlet complaints resolution display compliance

Availability of the Code of Conduct in English and at least one other official language

Icasa retail outlet code of conduct language availability compliance

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South African cellphone shops fail inspections