Game development thriving in South Africa

Make Games South Africa has released the results of its 2015 games development survey, which shows that the local industry continues to grow and provide employment for many South Africans.

Nicholas Hall, chairman of Make Games SA, said he is excited by the growth and hopes developers can build on the success of 2014.

“We’ve managed to reach out to more organisations and get better, more in-depth data about the state of the industry,” said Hall.

The results of the Make Games South Africa Industry Survey 2015 survey are detailed below.

Employment

In total, the 40 organisations who responded to the survey contribute an estimated R53 million to the industry in 2014 – an 83% increase compared to last year.

Together, these studios provide full-time employment for 152 people and contract out 101 part-time jobs.

Currently, the majority of these studios focus on a mixture of contract game development work and the development of their own game products.

There are 12 studios, though, that focus solely on developing their own games and another four who work exclusively on contracts work for clients.

Game studio locations
Game studio locations

Diversity

Make Games South Africa said there is not much diversity within the industry, and it is planning to take action to correct this.

Currently, women make up about 12% of the local game industry while blacks, Coloureds, and Asians/Indians make up 3%, 4%, and 1% of the industry respectively.

Demographics
Demographics

Future Growth

“The industry is at an interesting point,” said Hall. “The impact of success stories like Desktop Dungeons, Broforce, Viscera Cleanup Detail, and Stasis have already bolstered the value of the industry, and we already see the impact for the young entrepreneurs involved.”

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Game development thriving in South Africa