R1 billion in unpaid e-toll bills: minister

Unregistered motorists in Gauteng owe the SA National Roads Agency Limited (Sanral) over R1 billion in unpaid e-toll accounts, Transport Minister Dipuo Peters said.

As of May 31, the unaudited amount owed for more than 90 days was R156,623,567 while R995,362,885 was owed to Sanral in a period of less than 90 days.

“However, it is noted that the amounts shown here are based on the alternative user tariff published in the gazette and not the e-tag tariff,” she said on Friday in reply to a parliamentary question.

“The gazetted e-tag tariff is lower than the alternative user tariff.”

She was responding to parliamentary questions from the Democratic Alliance.

DA MP Manny de Freitas said this showed that motorists continue to reject e-tolls.

“Considering the system only came online in early December of 2013, the level of overdue payments act as yet another indicator that motorists’ on South Africa’s roads continue to reject the system,” he said in a statement.

“To allow the system to continue to function as it has not only serves to ignore the massive public outcry over e-tolls but also callously ignores the added economic burden placed on the already strained finances of South Africans.”

He said Parliament should listen to South Africans’ and push for a complete review of the e-toll system.

On Tuesday, Peters announced a “reprieve” for the users of Gauteng’s e-toll roads.

Opening debate in Parliament on her department’s budget, she told MPs this was being done “to make it easier for people to comply” with e-tolls.

Peters said users would have 51 days from the day they passed through the gantry, as opposed to the current seven days, to pay their bills. They would also get a time-of-day discount.

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R1 billion in unpaid e-toll bills: minister