Posting naked photos of your children on Facebook – FPB may charge you with child porn

German police recently issued a warning to parents to stop posting photos of their children on Facebook and other social media platforms.

The Hagen Police post said that while parents think the photos are sweet, it can result in embarrassment for children. The photos of children could also be exploited by bullies or paedophiles.

This warning coincides with the current push by the Film and Publication Board (FPB) in South Africa to regulate online content in the country – including the classifying of material published on platforms such as Facebook.

The FPB published its Draft Online Regulation Policy in the Government Gazette of 4 March 2015.

In August 2015, the South African Cabinet approved the introduction of a Films and Publications Amendment Bill into the Parliamentary process.

Nude photos of children on Facebook

MyBroadband spoke to the FPB about the consequences parents could face if they post naked photos of their young children on Facebook.

“The FPB is currently embarking on education [drives] and outreaches to address issues related to cyber security and how paedophiles operate,” said the FPB.

“It is very important for parents and caregivers to understand, as innocent nude pictures of children can be stolen and circulated among paedophiles to satisfy their sexual and evil appetite.”

The FPB said: “Any person who knowingly makes available… or in any way distributes or causes to be made available… scenes of child pornography… shall be guilty of an offence.”

According to the FPB’s website, child pornography is defined as “any image or description of sexual conduct involving persons under the age of 18 years”.

It did not state whether nude photos of young children posted by their parents would be considered pornography, when asked.

According to local reports, “normal” naked photos of children are considered pornography, though – as stated by child protection experts and academics.

Even if the images are taken and published with consent or by the child’s parents, they will be considered child pornography.

If the content is considered pornography, the case will be referred to the SAPS, said the FPB.

“If [the content] is not hosted within the republic, we refer the matter to INHOPE for escalation to the relevant authority of the identified country.”

More on Facebook

Don’t fall for these Facebook scams

Facebook fixes iPhone battery drain issue

Latest news

Partner Content

Show comments

Recommended

Share this article
Posting naked photos of your children on Facebook – FPB may charge you with child porn