Top-secret spy project turned out to be a R10-million mansion for minister

A “top-secret” state spy fund project has turned out to be the purchase of a mansion in Pretoria for the minister of state security, according to a report in the Sunday Times.

The report stated that a spy fund was used to buy Minister Dipuo Letsatsi-Duba the mansion, after she rejected the house the government gave her.

The minister was allocated a house by the Department of Public Works, but said it had faulty plugs and damp patches.

Letsatsi-Duba then reportedly began personally negotiating the purchase of the Waterkloof, Pretoria mansion.

The minister deviated from the supply chain management process to do this, “signing off on R10 million from the State Security Agency’s slush fund”, stated the Sunday Times.

It added that the slush fund is meant for top-secret projects, paying informants, and buying special equipment.

At least 5 living areas

The Sunday Times stated it has seen a document which was used by the agency to purchase the house with the fund’s money, which detailed the minimum requirements for the property.

This included at least 4 bedrooms, 5 living areas, and 2 studies. It had to cater for at least 6 vehicles, too.

“Two sources with intimate knowledge of the purchase of the property said the house was specifically bought for the minister and that the letter from SSA seeking approval was just a way of working around it,” stated the report.

A State Security Agency spokesperson told the Sunday Times that following “months of engagement with public works to find suitable accommodation”, Letsatsi-Duba is considering a number of accommodation options – including the R10-million mansion.

The allocation of the SSA’s funds to buy a house took place despite the fact that for 2018, all government ministers are paid a salary of R2.4 million per year.

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Top-secret spy project turned out to be a R10-million mansion for minister