Age, gender, and existing conditions – The South Africans most at risk from COVID-19

The Department of Health has revealed information on which groups of South Africans may be vulnerable to COVID-19.

It said that based on the data it has on patients who have been hospitalized, there is evidence emerging worldwide that the three most common comorbidities associated with serious illness from COVID-19 are:

  • Hypertension
  • Diabetes
  • Cardiac disease

Other comorbidities that were seen among COVID-19 patients were chronic pulmonary disease, asthma, chronic renal disease, malignancy, HIV, active and past tuberculosis.

Combined with data on the ages of those who have died from COVID-19, the department said “South Africans who are over 63 years of age and those who live with these conditions [must] take extra precaution as government eases the lockdown”.

COVID-19 information

The table below details the findings from the Department of Health on those who have died from COVID-19 in South Africa.

COVID-19 Deaths
Gender
Male – 71 (58%) Female – 52 (42%)
Age
0-9 0
10-19 0
20-29 1 (0.8%)
30-39 6 (4.9%)
40-49 19 (15.5%)
50-59 23 (18.7%)
60-69 30 (24.4%)
70-79 28 (22.7%)
80-89 14 (11.4%)
90-99 2 (1.6%)

Cases to date

The total number of confirmed COVID-19 cases recorded in South Africa has reached 6,336, stated the Department of Health this evening.

This is up from 5,951 confirmed COVID-19 cases reported yesterday.

“The total number of tests conducted to date is 230,686, of which 13,164 were done in the last 24 hours,” said the department. “This is the highest number of tests done in a 24-hour cycle to date.”

It added that a further seven deaths attributed to COVID-19 had been reported. This brings the total number of deaths to 123.

“We are, however, pleased to report that the number of recoveries now stands at 2,549.

Now read: 13 more deaths due to COVID-19 in South Africa

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Age, gender, and existing conditions – The South Africans most at risk from COVID-19