Telkom’s broadband subscribers decline

Telkom has released its financial results for the six months ended 30 September 2017.

They show that the company’s broadband subscribers declined by 1.9% year-on-year – with fixed-broadband subscribers dropping from 1,018,405 in September 2016 to 999,311 in September 2017.

The results also revealed that Telkom’s Internet all access subscribers declined from 561,581 in September 2016 to 533,550 in September 2017.

Telkom said the decline in fixed consumer broadband subscribers exhibited in recent years has “moderated with the base stabilising in the last two months”.

“We continue to see significant growth in fibre customers, albeit from a low base, driven by an increase in new‐to‐franchise business as well as migration of DSL customers to fibre,” said Telkom.

Telkom said its Unlimited Home product suite has redefined and broadened the addressable fixed-broadband market base.

“High levels of churn seen previously have now stabilised and we see an increase in ARPU as existing customers migrate from capped to uncapped products and to higher speeds.”

Telkom’s broadband subscriber numbers are detailed below.

Telkom Broadband Subscribers

Telkom Fixed Broadband Subscribers
Date Subscribers Monthly growth
Mar-03 2,669 0
Sep-03 12,000 1,555
Mar-04 20,313 1,386
Sep-04 37,000 2,781
Mar-05 58,278 3,546
Sep-05 95,920 6,274
Mar-06 143,509 7,932
Sep-06 190,172 7,777
Mar-07 255,633 10,910
Sep-07 335,112 13,247
Mar-08 412,190 12,846
Sep-08 491,774 13,264
Mar-09 548,015 9,374
Sep-09 602,720 9,118
Mar-10 647,462 7,457
Sep-10 699,368 8,651
Mar-11 751,625 8,710
Sep-11 795,419 7,299
Mar-12 827,091 5,279
Sep-12 841,831 2,457
Mar-13 870,505 4,779
Sep-13 898,203 4,616
Mar-14 926,944 4,790
Sep-14 971,319 7,396
Mar-15 1,005,286 5,661
Sep-15 1,015,307 1,670
Mar-16 1,027,507 2,033
Sep-16 1,018,405 -1,517
Mar-17 1,003,521 -2,481
Sep-17 999,311 -702

Now read: 15GB for R99 – Telkom Big Deal

Latest news

Partner Content

Show comments

Recommended

Share this article
Telkom’s broadband subscribers decline