EASSy downtime may last for days

The East Africa Submarine System (EASSy), a submarine fibre cable system on the East coast of Africa, has encountered problems since yesterday morning.

EASSy’s South African landing partner, Telkom, said in a network notice that a failure between Rosebank and Amsterdam [on EASSy] started at 09:26 on Friday 17 February, causing degraded internet browsing.

Two industry sources says that initial indications are that a suspected undersea cable break between Djibouti and Port Sudan is to blame for the downtime. According to one industry source a repair ship is being prepared to fix the fault, but that the downtime may last for days.

Not all clients are however affected.  Neotel’s Angus Hay explains that Neotel’s own services are not affected because they carry traffic from Djibouti to international destinations (instead of from Port Sudan) which leaves their services unaffected.

Hay however pointed out that companies who rely on onward services from Port Sudan are affected by the EASSy cable problems.

WIOCC explains

WIOCC Chief Operating Officer Ryan Sher told MyBroadband that a cable cut on SMW3 in the red sea occurred yesterday which is to blame for EASSy service disruptions.

“The investigation is ongoing and the last update we received from the SMW3 NOC was that the exact location was being established so that a ship can be mobilised. Some traffic on EASSy uses SMW3 to connect to Europe, as one of multiple ‘onward cable’ options, and it is this traffic that will be down,” explained Sher.

“However, it is for events like this that WIOCC procures capacity on SAT-3, EIG, TEAMS+SMW4 and Djibouti IP VPOP. All our SA customers who are on SMW3 also use our SAT3 capacity for diversity,” says Sher.

“WIOCC has also made a strategic investment on WACS to continue to provide diversity options to our customers. It is important for sub-sea cable users to build diversity into their networks or use the numerous diversity options we provide.”

Latest news

Partner Content

Show comments

Recommended

Share this article
EASSy downtime may last for days