Join us now. It is free, and it takes less than 1 minute to register.
Register now
Subscribe to our daily newsletter. It is free, and it comes with many benefits.


+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 66 FirstFirst 1234561252 ... LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 988

Thread: Introduction to Islam

  1. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kosmik View Post
    Arb question but can you explain the below:

    The second Caliph, Umar, related in a hadith

    I'm assuming Caliph is some form of ruler/title? Hadith a memoir or letter?
    Caliph-Ruler

    Hadith is everything that is recorded by the Sahabah (Companions) of the Prophet (S.A.W) statements, actions etc

    See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hadith

  2. #17
    Super Grandmaster Kosmik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    In the valley
    Posts
    15,364

    Default

    Thnx for the info guys.
    Neo-Luddite - Permanent Darwin award candidates

  3. #18
    Super Grandmaster abzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Kapkaupunki
    Posts
    27,672

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DrYes View Post
    Why do some muslim men have dark marks on their foreheads?
    Is it self inflicted?
    Probably from the prayer position.

    Edit : seems I was correct it even has it's own wiki page!
    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prayer_bump
    Last edited by abzo; 03-07-2012 at 10:21 PM.

  4. #19

    Default

    Some Muslims also believe that on the day of judgement, this bump will particularly fluoresce an immense white light.
    Prayer bump = 1
    Head lamp = 0

    Where can i get one of these prayer mats?
    DEL PythonFSi

  5. #20
    Super Grandmaster abzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Kapkaupunki
    Posts
    27,672

    Default

    Apparently some men deliberately use rougher mats (eg straw mats) and rub their heads harder to get this mark since its a sign of piousness.

    Also, some men have similar marks near their ankles.

    Last edited by abzo; 04-07-2012 at 12:19 PM.

  6. #21
    Grandmaster
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    /\/ŻŻŻŻŻ\/\
    Posts
    2,663

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by abzo View Post
    Apparently some men deliberately use rougher mats (eg straw mats) and rub their heads harder to get this mark since its a sign of piousness.

    Also, some men have similar marks near their ankles.
    hehe, I guess you get the literals in all religions/non-religions. lol.

    But what's up with the ankle marks?

  7. #22
    Super Grandmaster abzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Kapkaupunki
    Posts
    27,672

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sodan View Post
    hehe, I guess you get the literals in all religions/non-religions. lol.

    But what's up with the ankle marks?
    From the seated position during prayer.

  8. #23

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PythonFSi View Post
    Nice thread.
    Religion is a textually transmitted disease . . .
    Doesn't add up ?

  9. #24
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    The Big Wide World
    Posts
    5,072

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by abandonallhope View Post
    Doesn't add up ?
    Knowing a lot about a religion is very useful for someone who is anti religious.
    Last edited by TheHiveMind; 04-07-2012 at 01:10 PM.

  10. #25

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TheHiveMind View Post
    Knowing a lot about a religion is very useful for someone who is anti religious.
    tsk tsk, nice ninja edit there.

  11. #26

    Default Role of the Caliph: 1 of 2

    Main > Q&A > Role of the Caliph: 1 | 2


    Quote Originally Posted by Kosmik View Post
    Arb question but can you explain the below:

    The second Caliph, Umar, related in a hadith

    I'm assuming Caliph is some form of ruler/title? Hadith a memoir or letter?
    Previous posts by others should give you a good idea of what these terms mean. Perhaps I should just add the following:

    Caliph (Ar: khaleefah) translates into English as deputy/vicegerent/custodian. The successors of Prophet Muhammad, i.e. the successive individuals who led the Muslims after the Prophet's death, were called caliphs. The first 4 of these successors are held in very high esteem by Muslims because of their impeccable characters. Umar was one of the closest companions of the Prophet, and the 2nd successor, after Abu Bakr.

    Why call them deputies? Why not title them to attribute the meaning of first-in-command?
    The successors regarded themselves as deputies of Prophet Muhammad, and sought to even post-humously implement the Prophet's will, and therefore God's Will, rather than their own. The title deputy is also understood in the context of God being the Lord of the worlds, and the highest rank that any created being can attain is that of deputy.

    One of the reasons that so many Muslim scholars are also environmentalists is because of this concept of custodianship of the Earth. While God states that:

    “To God belongs all that is in the heavens and in the earth, for God encompasses everything.” (Quran 4:126)

    God also says, regarding the human status of caliph in the context of denoting stewardship:

    "It is He (God) who has made you custodians, inheritors of the earth." (Quran 6:165)
    Last edited by wayfarer; 18-02-2016 at 04:34 PM.

  12. #27

    Default 3. Canonical Texts

    Main > Canonical Texts


    The word "canon" is an English word referring, in this context, to sacred texts. Interestingly, it derives from the Arabic word "kanun", which means "law" or "principle".

    Islam does not, like Christianity, have a clergy. There is no institute that holds it together or unifies it. So how has it held together and flourished for the last 14 centuries? How has its core remained so homogeneous that the Islam of 1900 CE was doctrinally exactly the same as the Islam of 700 CE? Where have its internal checks and balances come from?

    The answer is that Islam has a traditional canon: a collection of sacred texts which everyone has agreed are authoritative and definitive, and which ‘fix’ the principles of belief, practice, law, theology and doctrine throughout the ages. All that Muslim scholars have left to do is to interpret these texts and work out their practical applications and details (and the principles of interpretation and elaboration are themselves ‘fixed’ by these texts), so that in Islam a person is only considered learned to the extent that he can demonstrate his knowledge of these texts.

    This does not mean that Islam is a religion of limitations for these texts are a vast ocean and their principles can be inwardly worked out almost infinitely in practice. It does mean, however, that Islam is ‘fixed’ and has certain limits beyond which it will not go. This is an extremely important concept to understand, because misunderstanding it, and setting aside the traditional canon of Islam, leads to people killing and assassinating others in the name of religion. The traditional canon of Islam is what protects not just the religion of Islam itself, but the world (including Muslims themselves) from terrorism, murder and oppression in the name of Islam. The canon is Islam’s internal check and balance system; it is what safeguards its moderation; it is ‘self-censorship’ and its ultimate safety feature.

    To be more specific, the Canon of mainstream Islam (more than 90% of the world's Muslims are mainstream) starts with the

    • Quran itself; then
    • Traditional Commentaries upon it (e.g. Tabari; Razi; Qurtubi; Jalalayn; Ibn Kathir) then
    • Eight traditional collections of Hadith, the sayings of the Prophet, (e.g. Muslim; Bukhari; Tirmidhi; Ibn Maja); then
    • Later Muhaddithin, or Traditionists (e.g. Bayhaqi; Baghawi; Nawawi and ‘Asqalani); then
    • Sira, the traditional biographical and historical works of the Prophetic era (Ibn Ishaq; Tabari; and Suhayli); then
    • the Risala of al Shafi‘i: the Muwatta’ of Imam Malik; the Ihya of Ghazali; Ash‘arite and Maturidian theology; the (original)‘Aqida of Tahawi; Imam Jazuli’s Dala’il al Khayrat, and finally - albeit only extrinsically - Pre-Islamic era poetry (as a background reference for the semantic connotations of words in the Arabic language).


    A specific (but not exhaustive) list is given, in order to minimize the possibility of misunderstanding.

    Adapted from RISSC publications.
    Last edited by wayfarer; 08-11-2012 at 09:44 PM.

  13. #28

    Default

    The traditional canon of Islam is what protects not just the religion of Islam itself, but the world (including Muslims themselves) from terrorism, murder and oppression in the name of Islam.
    err . . . but . . . oh!
    DEL PythonFSi

  14. #29
    Super Grandmaster
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Right here
    Posts
    6,554

    Default

    How can it be said to remain homogenous when there are text added to it over time?
    That which comes into existence will eventually break apart and pass away

  15. #30
    rehabilitated troller I.am.Sam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    In my own mind....
    Posts
    74,319

    Default

    OP not sure if you have text on the 5 pillars but i feel that is more important as a base to understanding as well
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Lowrey
    We're on the internet to troll not to make bonds.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 66 FirstFirst 1234561252 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. My introduction
    By AnetteW in forum First Posts, Intros, Forum Questions
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 30-06-2012, 08:49 AM
  2. Introduction
    By ISman in forum First Posts, Intros, Forum Questions
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 26-05-2012, 02:47 PM
  3. New introduction here
    By Monermajetomi in forum First Posts, Intros, Forum Questions
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 01-04-2011, 10:27 AM
  4. Introduction...
    By Cybermoo in forum Apple Mac, iPad and iPhone
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 15-05-2008, 12:18 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •