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Thread: 2017 Mercedes-AMG GTR

  1. #106

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    in the non funky colours the car looks a bit bland

  2. #107
    Super Grandmaster FiestaST's Avatar
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  3. #108
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    Track drive: AMG's brutal new GT R and GT C

    Mercedes-AMG has added two new high-performance variants to its range of GT two-seater sports cars in South Africa, as AMG celebrates its 50th birthday this year.

    The new GT C Roadster becomes the new flagship of the soft-top line up while the GT R, available as a hard-top coupé derivative only, is the raciest and most track-focused car offered by Mercedes-AMG.

    There's also a new roadster version of the entry-level GT with outputs of 350kW and 630Nm.

    Mercedes-AMG GT R

    It’s nicknamed the ‘Beast of the Green Hell’ after the legendary northern loop of the Nurburgring where it spent much of its development time, and is available in an appropriate colour exclusive to this car: AMG green hell magno. If that’s too ‘foresty’ for your taste it’s available in red too.

    Designed with racetrack use firmly in mind, the GT R gets a dose of extra muscle along with the ability to lay it all down with suspension, steering, braking and aerodynamic upgrades. Pumped-out front and rear fenders and a big rear wing give this R version a none-too-subtle presence. So too the Panamericana grille with 15 chrome-plated vertical bars as used in the Mercedes-AMG customer racing cars.

    The 4-litre biturbo V8 gets added boost pressure to hike outputs to 430kW and 700Nm, giving the front-engined, rear-wheel drive GT R the ability to scorch to 100km/h in just 3.6 seconds, and onto a 318km/h top speed.

    An active spoiler in the front underbody deploys at 80km/h to increase front downforce. This improves steering precision in high-speed cornering, which is further enhanced by active rear-wheel steering. Up to 100 km/h the rear wheels are turned in the opposite direction to the fronts, making for a smaller turning circle and more agility. Above 100km/h the rear wheels are turned in the same direction as the fronts to optimise high-speed handling stability.

    An electronically-controlled limited slip differential at the rear axle maximises on-the-limit cornering grip, and the motorsport-derived traction control allows drivers to pre‑select the slip on the rear wheels in nine levels, depending on their skill and bravery.

    The motorsport-derived coil-over suspension was designed specifically for the AMG GT R, and allows drivers to select their personal set-up and adjust the spring pre-load manually. AMG Ride Control adaptive damping automatically stiffens or softens the damping to suit driving conditions.

    The carbon-fibre torque tube linking the front-mounted engine with the rear-mounted seven-speed dual clutch auto gearbox is about 40 percent lighter than the aluminium tube in the standard AMG GT. Further weight savings come from the standard-fit forged wheels (fitted with grippy semi-slick tyres), the titanium rear silencer, fewer soundproofing materials, and lightweight manually-adjustable AMG sports bucket seats.

    All this tech adds up to a car that felt in its element when I drove it around the Kyalami racetrack, where the media launch was held this week. Having first driven the lesser AMG GT versions - and as proficient as they were - the GT R really came alive as a car that was purpose-made for scorching lap times with its crisper steering and generally sportier demeanour. For a front-engined car with a long nose, it displayed impressive flickability.

    Great sound too, and the AMG engineers deserve a pat on the back for liberating such a hearty war cry from a turbo engine.

    Mercedes-AMG GT C Roadster

    This is the flagship in the GT soft-top line up, and wields a 410kW/610Nm version of the biturbo 4-litre V8 which is good for 0-100 in 3.7 secs and a 316km/h top speed - just a snip slower than the GT R coupe.

    Like the abovementioned GT R it has wider rear shoulders than the standard GT and GT S models and the vertical-slatted Panamericana grille, along with much of the R’s racetrack-attacking tech including rear wheel steering, electric diff, and AMG Ride Control sports suspension.

    It’s a more luxury-oriented model but still very accomplished around a racetrack, and drivers can adjust the car’s personality with four modes for the seven-speed dual-clutch transmission: Comfort, Sport, Sport Plus, and Race.

    It too has a sound to make you want to play head-banging air guitar, and the AMG performance exhaust has variably adjustable flaps that modulate between Guns ‘n Roses and Metallica.

    The electronically-controlled soft top folds up or down in a very brisk 11 seconds, at driving speeds up to 50km/h.

    It’s also available in a very limited-availability AMG GT C Roadster Edition 50 with an extended range of equipment and special design features, but hurry: at the time of writing only three were left in South Africa.

    PRICES:

    GT coupé, 340kW / 600Nm R1 961 844
    GT S coupé, 375kW / 650Nm R2 218 756
    GT R coupé, 430kW / 700Nm R2 705 746
    GT roadster, 350kW / 630Nm R2 211 186
    GT C roadster, 410kW / 680Nm R2 615 746

    https://www.iol.co.za/motoring/lates...-gt-c-11032738

  4. #109
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    Extended Mercedes-AMG GT range (2017) Launch Review

    The AMG GT and GT S meet their snarly new siblings, the GT R and GT C at Kyalami Race Circuit.

    Viscera. It's that stuff in your gut that AMG insistently takes a spoon to, then gives it a vigorous stir. When Mercedes-Benz's Affalterbach-based division first gave birth to the SLS, it had spawned AMG’s first road car. And, as sad as it was to see them cull it a few years later, they did thoughtfully replace it with that most evocative of teardrop profiles, a velvet glove slipped over a brutish, growly biturbo V8 with the advent of the smaller GT.

    Soon after, it dialled up the aggression as AMG does and out came the S model. So now 375 kW and 650 Nm play the standard car’s 350 kW and 630 Nm and the zero to hundred sprint sheared from 4 seconds flat to 3.8 seconds. But as is typical of these power games, it’s not the incremental hike in outputs that set the two cars apart.

    Bells? Whistles? Somewhat, but for the most part, it comes down to demeanour. What then of the AMG GT R, now blessed with a 3.6sec sprint time, 430 kW and 700 Nm? And crucially, where does the newest of them all fit in, the GT C?

    The short answer, of course, is perfectly in between, with power and torque now sitting at 410 kW and 680 Nm and 100kph crossed in 3.7 seconds. Elementary Herr Watson, but if only we could drive the three monikers back to back at great pace, and in a safe, controlled environment. Enter South Africa’s premier race circuit, Kyalami.

    S, C, R… is AMG playing scrabble?

    Mercedes-AMG put its GT family onto a race track, the only safe space to try tame these beasts

    Let us discard the base GT to start, and secondly, I’ll ask you to indulge us as we pit roadsters and coupes against each other for obvious reasons. I’m going to do this all wrong, and start with the most powerful animal here, the GT R that danced around the Nordschleife so impressively that it even stole its nickname; The Green Hell. You’ll especially see the resemblance in the one I’m driving thanks to its green Magno paintwork. Many V8s roar, most of them snarl, but AMGs growl. It’s in its marketing material for good reason, Affalterbach knows how to tune an exhaust note. The GT R doesn’t let the German side down, rather this car feels representative of the might of their noise department.

    Dial the driving mode selector into Sport+, pull both shift paddles towards you, flatten the brake and floor the throttle to release a baritone thrum that will send shivers up your spine, and naughty thoughts into your hippocampus. It rocks the little AMG’s chassis. Rocks but never lulls, you feel at the helm of a caged predator, and with the release of the brake pedal, all the other colours of hell join the green to break loose. And you’re off to the sound of thunder resonating in a metal bucket… rolling down a flight of stairs.

    AMG GT-R. Raw, focused and potent... did we mention loud? Boy it's loud!

    It’s quick, blistering, yet that acre-long bonnet feels a lap ahead of you. The GT R grips fiercely, my white knuckles suggest I am too. Immediately you can tell this car, a product of a company that has cultivated its products solely on race tracks, has proper pedigree, balance and precision where you might have suspected it was brutish and cumbersome. Before this test is over, it will reveal itself the easiest car to drive here. Climb into the older GT S and immediately you’re aware of the deficit in power and twist, and the better-appointed cabin – the GT R really plays that race-car-for-the-road card with conviction, including but not limited to a half roll cage, traction control dials and bucket seats.

    The GT S is still a force of nature, lapping the circuit with similar verve and noise if somewhat turned down the wick. You’d need to be a race driver or have supernatural driving ability to truly eke out the R’s performance abilities above and beyond the still-hot S, but where the Green Hell car is uncompromising, the GT S feels close to that original base car – in this company anyway. But, and this part is worth remembering, the base car still feels absolutely special.

    GT C Roadster - a tasty yet potent proposition

    This brings us neatly and finally to the newest car in the lineup, the GT C Roadster. It's CV places it tidily in the middle in terms of price and performance, and if you’re after something very exclusive, Mercedes-AMG South Africa has brought four Edition 50 derivatives into the country at a premium. The GT C, like the GT R, comes with rear axle steer, includes adjustable damping and larger brake discs, throaty exhaust flaps (more noise, more AMG) and receives a raft of cosmetic upgrades including wider arches, more vents than ever, silver details and accents and 20 inch alloys at the rear – the fronts are ‘mere’ 19 inchers.

    Style and cabriolet sophistication meets tasty V8 performance

    It’s an overall overhaul to the performance and luxury of the base car but for now, let’s focus on the newfound shunt. I’ll happily cut to the chase and deliver my impression around Kyalami. The GT C feels much closer to the S than the R in its behaviour, slap bang between them for noise and drama, but in terms of engagement nothing touches the R. The GT R would not be my GT of choice for a daily drive, for that the GT C trumps its siblings. All of them. It’s a well-balanced performance coupe, a fine AMG, trouncing the S in every department. The GT R is hewn from race tracks, and must live on race tracks where it excels. It’s surprisingly comfortable considering how much technology has gone in (such as active aero panels to control heat and a carbon splitter with 80mm of travel) and how much weight has come out (including using lightweight magnesium components). But ultimately we’re playing with cars that can launch themselves from standstill to 100kph in 3.6, 3.7 and 3.8 seconds respectively. When performance results are this close to each other I’m afraid it comes down to the leather and the weather, and what's on offer in the open-air C is sumptuous.

    A tasty verdict of sorts

    The AMG GT family then isn’t a family at all. They’re flavours. Spicy, sweet and savoury – you decide which is which, except for the GT R – that’s wasabi! You might like spicy all the time, or just once in a while. You might hate the sweet stuff, or could happily survive on a savoury, day in and day out every minute of your life, so pick a GT that suits your taste. Me, I like chilli chocolate. What’s worth noting, however, is that the GT C is a brilliantly quick car that is also incredibly luxurious. While the GT R is a brilliantly quick car that is not.

    How attractive is the Panamericana grille fitted to the Mercedes-AMG GT?

    Mercedes-AMG GT Range Price in South Africa (September 2017)

    R2 199 000 GT Roadster (350kW/630Nm)
    R2 199 000 GT S Coupe (375kW/650Nm)
    R2 599 000 GT C Roadster (410kW/680Nm)
    R2 689 000 GT R (the Green Hell car - 430kW/700Nm)
    R2 864 000 GT C Edition 50 (410kW/680Nm - limited to four in South Africa)

    http://www.cars.co.za/motoring_news/...-review/43890/









    https://youtu.be/IZqcQGI-czg

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    Super Grandmaster Dan C's Avatar
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    If my bitcoins are doing well, I'll order one soon.
    I never apologise. I’m sorry, that’s just the way I am.

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