Anyone take UNISA's B.Sc in applied math and computer science?

Iphoenix

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I want to register for a B.Sc applied math and computer programming at Unisa, but I was wondering if anyone could shed some light on what programming languages they teach in that course?
 

Krosis

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Firstly, the applied math modules are punishing, I've heard horror stories. Secondly, that's probably the best major combination for CS, but programming modules will be few and far between. You'll be doing C++ from 1st year, with the Qt framework being used from 2nd year onwards. There's also a visual programming module that uses Python (it used to be Delphi), but this one is relatively easy, literally (not really) free marks. There should be 2 1st year C++ modules, 2 in 2nd year with 1 of them using Qt, then just 1 more 3rd year module. Oh, there's also a bit of assembly programming in the 2nd year computer organization module. I don't think you'll do computer graphics, but it's a 3rd year webgl module that's an elective that'll be available depending on your elective module selection from 1st year - but I think taking CS with applied math won't give you that option. The rest will be CS theory and IS modules with some math & applied math mixed in.
 

vic777

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To add to Krosis' answer, all of the CS degrees at UNISA have the same main programming languages - C++ as main language, Python (if you choose that elective), Assembly for computer organization and graphics (if you choose that elective) until recently allowed you to choose between OpenGL (C) and WebGL (Javascript)

I knew someone that did this specific major you are interested in and he said the applied maths modules are very challenging. It sounds like a wonderful degree though
 

cguy

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One of the cool things about university maths is that you get to understand why your user name is actually "-phoenx".
 

[)roi(]

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What have you done i.t.o. mathematics so far; because jumping straight into applied mathematics can be both quite daunting and a bit off putting as a start; many students crash and burn in year 1.

As for programming they tend to be some combination of C, C++, CUDA, Java, Julia, OpenMP, ... and a number of others; varying both by institution and areas of study.
 

Sailor91

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Firstly, the applied math modules are punishing, I've heard horror stories. Secondly, that's probably the best major combination for CS, but programming modules will be few and far between. You'll be doing C++ from 1st year, with the Qt framework being used from 2nd year onwards. There's also a visual programming module that uses Python (it used to be Delphi), but this one is relatively easy, literally (not really) free marks. There should be 2 1st year C++ modules, 2 in 2nd year with 1 of them using Qt, then just 1 more 3rd year module. Oh, there's also a bit of assembly programming in the 2nd year computer organization module. I don't think you'll do computer graphics, but it's a 3rd year webgl module that's an elective that'll be available depending on your elective module selection from 1st year - but I think taking CS with applied math won't give you that option. The rest will be CS theory and IS modules with some math & applied math mixed in.
I'm a new member here and i wanna apply for bscapplied mathematics and mathematics at unisa, can you please advice on what to expect and what should one posses in order to succed
 

cguy

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I'm a new member here and i wanna apply for bscapplied mathematics and mathematics at unisa, can you please advice on what to expect and what should one posses in order to succed
Make sure you know your matric maths very very well. The courses move quickly, and you don’t want to be stuck doing revision.

I suggest doing some CS modules as well - unless you want to become an academic, this will be needed for any form of real work. Applied maths will eventually expose you to some programming and software packages, but it would be a lot easier if you had more experience and a basic CS background when you hit this.

Also, if you want to go down more of the applied route, there is generally a physics bend to it (PDEs, fluid dynamics, modeling, etc.). Then there is the more statistical route (machine learning, regression analysis, etc.). So you may want to plan physics and/or stats undergrad courses accordingly.
 
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Sailor91

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Make sure you know your matric maths very very well. The courses move quickly, and you don’t want to be stuck doing revision.

I suggest doing some CS modules as well - unless you want to become an academic, this will be needed for any form of real work. Applied maths will eventually expose you to some programming and software packages, but it would be a lot easier if you had more experience and a basic CS background when you hit this.

Also, if you want to go down more of the applied route, there is generally a physics bend to it (PDEs, fluid dynamics, modeling, etc.). Then there is the more statistical route (machine learning, regression analysis, etc.). So you may want to plan physics and/or stats undergrad courses accordingly.
Ok thanks. I am up to date when it comes to grade 12 mathematics because I’ve been tutoring in that space of development and I studied electrical engineering which deals with the selfsame maths and more and I’m currently lecturing mathematics at TVET college for both ncv and nated courses. I would like to become an academic and also I want to venture into financial engineering after bsc in applied maths...I wanna do honours degree in financial engineering at unisa and I thought applied maths and pure maths as my majors would be ideal.
 

Sailor91

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Ok thanks. I am up to date when it comes to grade 12 mathematics because I’ve been tutoring in that space of development and I studied electrical engineering which deals with the selfsame maths and more and I’m currently lecturing mathematics at TVET college for both ncv and nated courses. I would like to become an academic and also I want to venture into financial engineering after bsc in applied maths...I wanna do honours degree in financial engineering at unisa and I thought applied maths and pure maths as my majors would be ideal.
Can they credit me for first year mathematics modules because I studied them under electrical engineering at cput and have passed mathematics 1 to 3 with 80% + ?
 

cguy

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Can they credit me for first year mathematics modules because I studied them under electrical engineering at cput and have passed mathematics 1 to 3 with 80% + ?
I’m not sure. It often depends on when they were done, and if the degree was completed (often completing it voids your ability to get credit for it since it has already been used towards a qualification). You would rest have to check.

Maths and App. Maths are definitely good for FE. So is CS, since you will likely have to write a lot of code to process financial data and test out hypotheses.

One caveat to be aware of is that FE courses often contain watered down versions of the pure science courses, so the graduates tend to be more familiar with finance, but less familiar works stars, app maths, ML, CS, etc.

I work as a quantitative developer/researcher and nobody in our company has an FE qualification. We’ve interviewed thousands of them, and found them to be a bit weaker in the science aspects, which we view more highly than finance.
 

cguy

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Can they credit me for first year mathematics modules because I studied them under electrical engineering at cput and have passed mathematics 1 to 3 with 80% + ?
Also, what did you do in maths 3? Engineering maths is very different to pure maths, especially towards the end.
 

Sailor91

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I’m not sure. It often depends on when they were done, and if the degree was completed (often completing it voids your ability to get credit for it since it has already been used towards a qualification). You would rest have to check.

Maths and App. Maths are definitely good for FE. So is CS, since you will likely have to write a lot of code to process financial data and test out hypotheses.

One caveat to be aware of is that FE courses often contain watered down versions of the pure science courses, so the graduates tend to be more familiar with finance, but less familiar works stars, app maths, ML, CS, etc.

I work as a quantitative developer/researcher and nobody in our company has an FE qualification. We’ve interviewed thousands of them, and found them to be a bit weaker in the science aspects, which we view more highly than finance.
I’m not sure. It often depends on when they were done, and if the degree was completed (often completing it voids your ability to get credit for it since it has already been used towards a qualification). You would rest have to check.

Maths and App. Maths are definitely good for FE. So is CS, since you will likely have to write a lot of code to process financial data and test out hypotheses.

One caveat to be aware of is that FE courses often contain watered down versions of the pure science courses, so the graduates tend to be more familiar with finance, but less familiar works stars, app maths, ML, CS, etc.

I work as a quantitative developer/researcher and nobody in our company has an FE qualification. We’ve interviewed thousands of them, and found them to be a bit weaker in the science aspects, which we view more highly than finance.
Ok thanks tremendously for the advices and pieces of wisdom you’ve shared...I will pay much mind to all the factors in question...one last question,I wanna complete the bsc in three years, does unisa allow one to take the maximum of say, six subjects per semester?
 

cguy

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Ok thanks tremendously for the advices and pieces of wisdom you’ve shared...I will pay much mind to all the factors in question...one last question,I wanna complete the bsc in three years, does unisa allow one to take the maximum of say, six subjects per semester?
I’m not sure how it’s structured these days (there’s a big UNISA thread on this forum that could answer that definitively though), but I am fairly sure that should be possible. At UCT one would do 4, then 3, then 2 courses in years 1, 2 and 3 respectively. The courses got harder though, so it may pyramid down like that too.
 

Sailor91

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I’m not sure how it’s structured these days (there’s a big UNISA thread on this forum that could answer that definitively though), but I am fairly sure that should be possible. At UCT one would do 4, then 3, then 2 courses in years 1, 2 and 3 respectively. The courses got harder though, so it may pyramid down like that too.
Thank you very much.
 

XennoX

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May I also ask this, if one wants to venture into actuarial science with bsc in applied maths, which path should one take?
For Actuarial Science you're going to need a solid grounding in statistics and probability theory with a decent dose of economic/finance theory.

You could look at UNISA's BSc (Applied) Mathematics and Statistics. The BSc Mathematics and Statistics will probably be more theoretical, when compared to its App. mathematics counterpart.

That being said, there might be degrees specifically tailored for Actuarial Science.
 

gkm

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For actuarial science, you need math, statistics, economics and accounting. I would recommend looking at one of the existing degrees for that at places like Pretoria, UCT or Stellenbosch for guidance on which subjects you should take. Applied maths is however fairly pointless for actuarial science. Read up here for more details: https://www.actuarialsociety.org.za/
 

Thlalefo

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Hey Guys

Thanks for the thread as well. I’ve just been accepted for AMC as well. I wanted to ask

1. how much studying/time do I need to put in a week as I have a Full time job.
2. Where can this qualification lead to and is it worth it ( for those who are studying / graduating )
3. Should I still go with it if I matriculated 5 years ago ?

My maths is rusty even though I did well then. I went straight into working to support my parents and younger siblings.
 

Fcon_Vpro

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Hey Guys

Thanks for the thread as well. I’ve just been accepted for AMC as well. I wanted to ask

1. how much studying/time do I need to put in a week as I have a Full time job.
2. Where can this qualification lead to and is it worth it ( for those who are studying / graduating )
3. Should I still go with it if I matriculated 5 years ago ?

My maths is rusty even though I did well then. I went straight into working to support my parents and younger siblings.
Im currently doing Maths with CS so not quite the applied maths route but similar enough. Im 15 years outside of matric and a full time developer.

1. They recommend 1 hour per module per day. I would say try do at least 2-3 hours per week per module unless its the EUP1501 module then you will do fine with winging it with 1 hour per week as long as you have some experience with Microsoft Office products. I also found COS1511 easy because of my developer experience so I put in less time for it. COS1501, COS1521 and MAT all need a lot of time to master the various math related problems.
2. Just on the computer science side the obvious answer is programming/development. It is definitely worth it. Obviously real world experience will be needed to really get somewhere with development, but having a strong applied maths background will put you in a good position for understanding and solving difficult concepts/challenges.
3. You should go with it regardless of any time away from Matric. I am struggling with the Maths but only because I havent put in enough time. For the past 2 weeks ive been putting in an hour per day for maths and its helping a lot.
 

phoneJunky

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Hey Guys

Thanks for the thread as well. I’ve just been accepted for AMC as well. I wanted to ask

1. how much studying/time do I need to put in a week as I have a Full time job.
2. Where can this qualification lead to and is it worth it ( for those who are studying / graduating )
3. Should I still go with it if I matriculated 5 years ago ?

My maths is rusty even though I did well then. I went straight into working to support my parents and younger siblings.
I am currently doing Math and Applied Math. I find the applied math side easier, but you will still need to do some Math things to do some of the AM modules.

On your questions:
1. I do max3 hours a week, but then again I only do 3 modules per semester.
2. Developer, data scientist etc. Lots of options for you.
3. Definitely, just check how many modules is comfortable for you. You don't need to do 5 or 6 modules per semester. You can do min 2 modules per semester, but then you have to make sure you don't fail. You need to pass 4 modules a year to carry on.

You don't really forget maths, you might start rusty - but it will pick up as you practice again
 
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