Eskom refuses to reduce staff

Sl8er

Executive Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2010
Messages
6,521
#2
A World Bank study from August 2016 found that Eskom was overstaffed by 66%. At the time, Eskom had 41,800 employees – while it only needed 14,200.
JHC.
Seriously, WTF.
 

FNfal

Executive Member
Joined
Jul 6, 2011
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5,434
#3
You dont expect any thing else do you ?
Fat cats are going to be what they are and we are just going to pay .
Bunch of morons .
 

garp

Executive Member
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Aug 2, 2004
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5,986
#4
Eskom is really nothing other than a conduit for wealth redistribution and keeping the ANC voting middle class in check. There is really no other logical explanation for employing 25000 superfluous workers at R750k p.a.
 

TysonRoux

Expert Member
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Aug 7, 2012
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2,632
#5
Eskom is really nothing other than a conduit for wealth redistribution and keeping the ANC voting middle class in check. There is really no other logical explanation for employing 25000 superfluous workers at R750k p.a.
What makes it even worse is the fact that those workers are useless, making it essential to pay high priced contractors to perform the duties that those workers are meant to do.
 

spiff

Expert Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2007
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4,096
#8
fark me!! sounds like blatant plunder to me!!

Eskom has said that charity starts at home, which is why the pension fund for government employees and local banks must be used to bail it out
thank god I don't have a government pension!!
 

R13...

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 4, 2008
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26,421
#9
No way government will allow them to reduce staff in a country with such a low employment rate. Eskom can probably turn a good profit at the rates they charge if they just up the productivity of the overstaff they have. A lot of the staff they have are apparently rather useless - they apparently hire people to help others as they aren't coping and then hire other to help the helpers. All because they went gung-ho with their selections & overzealous application of equity without regard for ability.
 

Arthur

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Aug 7, 2003
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#10
As is almost always the case, the real problem here is the government's own legally-mandated and legally-protected monopoly on bulk electricity generation and distribution. (Yes, there are some small token concessions here and there, but the great bulk of electrical power is produced and distributed by the state's own business.)

The only long-term solution lies in abolishing the state monopolists and allowing entrepreneurs to compete for the consumer's business.
 

Temujin

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Apr 18, 2015
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#11
Eskom had 41,800 employees – while it only needed 14,200.
This is a problem everywhere... buildings full of people not knowing what their job is, let alone doing it... its why something that should take a few minutes to sort out takes months, or in my experience, several years... ****ing mind boggling.

Think need to just tax companies higher, before you flip out, that money is being paid in salaries anyway, so, a higher tax but less salaries may save companies money. Give the leeches of society their free everything, housing, electricity, water, education etc, and then a livable food/clothing/accessory allowance, I'm talking middle class monthly food bill etc, not a couple of hundred for pap... ie, pay them monthly salary to shut up and keep them out of the runnings of the world, which is all they want, sit under a tree with their free ****... that leaves the rest who want to work do their jobs unhindered, get **** done in a day instead of months/years, and we can continue growing the country and economy etc.
 

Absinth

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2008
Messages
605
#12
The staff number sounds a bit high and comparing local company to an international one is not best business practice.

The way we work in South Africa is very different to the rest of the world.

Unfortunately, you will need to spend more money, by appointing an independent consulting company that's main goal would be to do an in depth analysis of what each section in the company is suppose to do.

Only once this is done you can recommend to reduce or redeploy the staff compliment.
 

akescpt

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 12, 2008
Messages
19,683
#13
The staff number sounds a bit high and comparing local company to an international one is not best business practice.

The way we work in South Africa is very different to the rest of the world.

Unfortunately, you will need to spend more money, by appointing an independent consulting company that's main goal would be to do an in depth analysis of what each section in the company is suppose to do.

Only once this is done you can recommend to reduce or redeploy the staff compliment.
yep. to make the process "legit". seen it happen. you'd be amazed at the inefficiencies they find. or the amount of people just moving papers from one side of their desk to the other everyday.
 

Gordon_R

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Jul 5, 2009
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3,645
#16
Eskom's status may change soon, according to the SONA: https://www.fin24.com/Entrepreneurs/ramaphosa-sona-financial-roundup-7-key-takeaways-20180216

Ramaphosa promised to "intervene decisively to stabilise and revitalise state owned enterprises” saying that South Africans could look at his intervention at Eskom for an indication of what to expect.

The president had in January, when he was still deputy president, ordered Eskom to appoint a new board and fire all executives accused of corruption and maladministration.

“These SOEs cannot borrow their way out of their financial difficulties, and we will therefore undertake a process of consultation with all stakeholders to review the funding model of SOEs and other measures,” he said, adding that boards would be professionalised and barred from any role in procurements.
 
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