Mango airline

Derrick

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Mango is a South African low-cost airline. It operates domestic scheduled budget services. Its main base is OR Tambo International Airport near Johannesburg. Mango has its head office on the mezannine level of the Domestic Departure Terminal.

Mango was launched on 30 October 2006 with bookings going on sale at midnight on the same date. Mango’s first flight took place on 15 November 2006.

Mango is a low cost airline featuring a uniform fleet of aircraft with high seating density. Mango also offers online ticketing.

Mango operates five Boeing 737-800 aircraft which are serviced and maintained by SAA Technical. Each aircraft carries 186 passengers between Johannesburg and Cape Town, Durban and Cape Town, Johannesburg and Durban and Bloemfontein and Cape Town as well as Lanseria and Cape Town and Bloemfontein and Johannesburg.

Source: Wikipedia

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Mango Flight JE251 declared a General Emergency this afternoon and arrived DBN 35 min late after leaving JNB 30 min late

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They still owe me a voucher which I'm sure I'll never see. They are your last domestic option, surely. Like, I'll pay double and rather fly Flysafair than ever support these clowns ever again.
 
as a general remark on the SA airline industry - my observation is that the remaining operators are doing a great job of taking up any slack in demand for seats, which obviates the need for SAA with its remaining Airbus-only fleet to do any local flights:

FlySafair (19), Mango (7) and Comair (with Kulula (10) & British Airways (17) livery) all flying ex-SAA Boeing 737’s and Lift, flying (3) ex-SAA Airbus A-320’s as well as Airlink flying a fleet of (46) Embraers have proved more than sufficient.

After returning 2 leased planes to Air Mauritius, SAA has only 12 planes remaining in its fleet
(8x A340, 3x A319, 1x A330) and it is only a shadow of what it was in its heyday, which supports the argument of those questioning the resurrection of this dead horse (dead bird?).


(numbers in brackets above indicate current number of remaing operable aircraft in each fleet - this excludes planes which remain parked due to COVID e.g Mango 5 parked + 7 in service = 12 total)



sources:

http://www.planespotters.net/airline/FlySafair

http://www.planespotters.net/airline/Mango

http://www.planespotters.net/airline/Kulula

http://www.planespotters.net/airline/Comair

http://www.planespotters.net/airline/Lift

http://www.planespotters.net/airline/Airlink
 
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In a non-COVID world, SAA already was on the brink of trying to explain its survival and constant bailouts. In this world i really don't see any reason SAA should continue.

if Government is hell bent on a "national carrier" there are other ways, like many countries do they can sell the brand off to Emirates, Ethiopian etc who'll fly their own planes with SAA branding. That way you keep the "name" without the ownership headache. For me, this is the only future SAA has.
 
Correction: SAA will soon only have 3 planes left

“It is understood that six of SAA’s remaining nine aircraft are for sale. This leaves the airline with an almost negligible fleet to operate the 27 routes that are listed in the airline’s business rescue plan.”


After returning 2 leased planes to Air Mauritius, SAA has only 12 planes remaining in its fleet (8x A340, 3x A319, 1x A330) and it is only a shadow of what it was in its heyday, which supports the argument of those questioning the resurrection of this dead horse (dead bird?).
 
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