Nokia on the comeback trail

Swa

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May 4, 2012
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#3
Nokia said it expects annual sales to grow in 2015 in all three remain sectors; networks, mapping services and technologies and patents.
Revolting when patents are considered a commodity. :sick:
 

Arthur

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Aug 7, 2003
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#6
Maybe Nokia will get back to their traditional business making tyres, gumboots and galoshes.
 

Fulcrum29

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#8
Revolting when patents are considered a commodity. :sick:
Depends, patents insures IP. People complain when something is copied, the same people argue that copy should be allowed, the same people go havoc when their own IP is copied.
 

Maverick Jester

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Oct 18, 2011
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#9
Revolting when patents are considered a commodity. :sick:
Nokia have no hardware division, and their software was killed years ago. How else are they going to make money other than through licensing their IP?

I don't agree with the practice in totality, but certain technologies should not be copied wholesale.
 

elvis_presley

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#10
Nokia have no hardware division, and their software was killed years ago. How else are they going to make money other than through licensing their IP?
The majority of Nokia's income still comes from hardware sales - but they only sell mobile/wireless infrastructure now. Their top income sources:

Nokia Networks (Infrastructure): 81%
HERE Maps: 7%
Patent Licensing: 3%

That's how they make money other than licensing their IP :)
 

Swa

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#11
Depends, patents insures IP. People complain when something is copied, the same people argue that copy should be allowed, the same people go havoc when their own IP is copied.
Patents and IP are different things. It's copyright that insure IP and it's automatic. The problem is that most patent offices are non-examining. So companies can patent any carp or something that already exists as patents or otherwise. It's only tested when there's alleged infringement. Legal costs surrounding patents are often too much for smaller companies so it's usually the larger ones that win out. Companies that deal in patents instead of actual good products are most guilty of this.

Patents were a good thing when they were envisioned but today they are used to stifle innovation. Our world is also moving at such a fast pace that it's unrealistic for someone to want to make use of something for 20 years.
 

Maverick Jester

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#13
The majority of Nokia's income still comes from hardware sales - but they only sell mobile/wireless infrastructure now. Their top income sources:

Nokia Networks (Infrastructure): 81%
HERE Maps: 7%
Patent Licensing: 3%

That's how they make money other than licensing their IP :)
Thanks. I understood that they sold off their mobile division, had forgotten about Nokia Networks.
 

Maverick Jester

The Special One
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Oct 18, 2011
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13,409
#14
Patents and IP are different things. It's copyright that insure IP and it's automatic. The problem is that most patent offices are non-examining. So companies can patent any carp or something that already exists as patents or otherwise. It's only tested when there's alleged infringement. Legal costs surrounding patents are often too much for smaller companies so it's usually the larger ones that win out. Companies that deal in patents instead of actual good products are most guilty of this.

Patents were a good thing when they were envisioned but today they are used to stifle innovation. Our world is also moving at such a fast pace that it's unrealistic for someone to want to make use of something for 20 years.
Blame the patent office for allowing arbitrary rubbish to be patented, not Nokia (or Apple or Google or anyone else) for merely maximising that flaw.

I agree with you, BTW.
 
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