Our Galaxy

nauseous_monkey

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I have been watching a large amount of the series 'Cosmos' by Carl Sagan and was wondering. What it the large glowing center to our galaxy? And why is it that the galaxy is spiraled?
 

Scooby_Doo

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large cluster of stars in the center and since the milkyway is spinning everything (stars etc) are betting "thrown" outwards, sure there is more too it than that and don't ask me why there are like spiral "arms" if you know what i mean.
 

Surv0

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Also been watching the same series.. only seen the first couple of episodes... a little slow for me but they did mention in the beginning that its based on ideas and theories that came about before science could confirm or deny them. So i think there are a few inconsistencies . Dont we have a black whole at the center of our galaxy?
 

nauseous_monkey

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Yeah, it is a very slow series. I only watched episode one last night, but I love Carl Sagan, he is willing to go beyond just blunt fact and hypothesize...

I especially felt both exited and sad when I saw the bit on The Library of Alexanderia.
 

nauseous_monkey

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yip massive black hole.
In other words: Moons around planets, planets around sun, sun around black hole? Nice!

Makes me think...

I know Planet becomes Sun and Sun becomes Black hole?

Is there a very concrete pattern of evolution here?
 

Surv0

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planets dont become suns afaik..
they die and become barron sandy balls of matter which will eventually be consumed by the universe.
Black holes come from dying stars which cave into themselves.
 

Scooby_Doo

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In other words: Moons around planets, planets around sun, sun around black hole? Nice!

Makes me think...

I know Planet becomes Sun and Sun becomes Black hole?

Is there a very concrete pattern of evolution here?
only the very massive stars that go super nova can create black holes, like our sun is not big enough to collapse into a black hole.

http://www.saintjoe.edu/~dept14/environment/rogero/core5/celestial_compare.html

this shows some of the stars that are out there as we can see we got a pretty small sun.
 

Moederloos

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yip massive black hole.
Ivy??

planets dont become suns afaik..
they die and become barron sandy balls of matter which will eventually be consumed by the universe.
Black holes come from dying stars which cave into themselves.
Yeah - I do not know what bizarro science thing that came from, but I too have heard people say that.

A planet cannot and will not ever become a sun - it is just way too small.
Its like expecting the peach on your dining room table to blow up like James and the Giant Peach - and even then - that result would still be too small to become a sun.

Jupiter, way more massive than earth, is way smaller than our sun - and a long way from even brown dwarf status.
 

Surv0

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good question, i was always asking my self, why is it that water always whirlpools in a clockwise motion in the into the center of the sink?
Water wirlpools clockwise in the southern hemisphere and anticlockwise in the northern hemisphere.
On the equater water moves straight down the whole with no spinning.
There is actually a tourist attraction on the equator in one of the countries crossing it, where you can watch water move straight down ;p

although there are people saying its a myth, ive seen it first hand, it actually did spin in different directions in different hemispheres.
 

Scooby_Doo

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Water wirlpools clockwise in the southern hemisphere and anticlockwise in the northern hemisphere.
On the equater water moves straight down the whole with no spinning.
There is actually a tourist attraction on the equator in one of the countries crossing it, where you can watch water move straight down ;p

although there are people saying its a myth, ive seen it first hand, it actually did spin in different directions in different hemispheres.
tried it and went the same direction in london as here apparently the shape of the basin is more of a factor than the coriolis effect. So if you had a perfectly round basin and moved it between the south and north of the equator, maybe...
 

mercurial

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you should watch the series called The Universe. it's on the history channel...and on the site of which we don't speak of :p
 

Surv0

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tried it and went the same direction in london as here apparently the shape of the basin is more of a factor than the coriolis effect. So if you had a perfectly round basin and moved it between the south and north of the equator, maybe...
Yeah heard about the shape of the basin being a factor... let say its perfectly round to prove a point :)
 

Highflyer_GP

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There's an awesome BBC documentary called BBC Space. It's 6 parts, part 1 deals with exactly these kinds of questions.

Basically when a large star goes supernova, it collapses under it's own weight leaving behind a black hole. All the hydrogen gas and particles that escape the black hole's event horizon after the explosion then form large gas clouds. The remnants of the explosion then start bonding to each other and swirling around in the gas cloud. As the temperatures increase, another star is born, and there is a second explosion. However the gravity of the new star keeps the particles from the second explosion orbiting around it as it rotates. The remnants of this second explosion then form the planets, in much the same way that the star was born after the original supernova. That's how we get solar systems. Therefore planets don't become stars, they are formed after the star itself is formed.
 

mercurial

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There's an awesome BBC documentary called BBC Space. It's 6 parts, part 1 deals with exactly these kinds of questions.

Basically when a large star goes supernova, it collapses under it's own weight leaving behind a black hole. All the hydrogen gas and particles that escape the black hole's event horizon after the explosion then form large gas clouds. The remnants of the explosion then start bonding to each other and swirling around in the gas cloud. As the temperatures increase, another star is born, and there is a second explosion. However the gravity of the new star keeps the particles from the second explosion orbiting around it as it rotates. The remnants of this second explosion then form the planets, in much the same way that the star was born after the original supernova. That's how we get solar systems. Therefore planets don't become stars, they are formed after the star itself is formed.
interesting. i will most def try and get that series. i have so many docus to watch. i haven't even had a chance to watch carl sagan yet.
 

Surv0

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BBC Space is brilliant, still have it, have watched it about 5 times...
It doesnt get boring
 

nauseous_monkey

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Thanks for clearing things up, I was high when I wrote that ;)

'Space' with the dude from Jurrasic Park... I watched it years back... awesome stuff... got me interested into actually studying something instead of just being a bum (which was my ultimate goal in life) :D

I will get 'The Universe' asap.

One Q remains... Why the spiral arms? And why that particular direction?
 
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