Scientists create artifical blood

ghoti

Karmic Sangoma
Joined
Jan 17, 2005
Messages
45,673
#1
simm1701 wrote us with a BBC article link on a sort of artificial blood substitute being developed by an English university. The substance is light, can survive at room temperature, and keeps longer than real blood, allowing it to be used as a stand-in in emergency situations. "The new blood is made up of plastic molecules that have an iron atom at their core, like haemoglobin, that can carry oxygen through the body. The scientists said the artificial blood could be cheap to produce and they were looking for extra funding to develop a final prototype that would be suitable for biological testing ... A sample of the artificial blood prototype will be on display at the Science Museum in London from 22 May as part of an exhibition about the history of plastics."
http://science.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=07/05/11/1859233
 

Tux

Software Communist
Joined
Aug 3, 2005
Messages
13,506
#2
Only problem I can see with that might be your body's immune system rejecting it. Would work fine as a short term solution maybe, but cant see it as a long-term replacement
 

Angstrom

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2003
Messages
546
#3
Only problem I can see with that might be your body's immune system rejecting it. Would work fine as a short term solution maybe, but cant see it as a long-term replacement
Long-term replacement, probably not. However, I remain fairly confident that they will come to terms with immune system rejection before they begin clinical trials on humans. This is assuming that they don't hit a brick wall before they get even that far.
 

TMoose

Expert Member
Joined
May 10, 2005
Messages
2,148
#4
I think this is awesome, considering the cost and risks of real human blood. Hopefully they can turn this into something viable.
 

Xarog

Honorary Master
Joined
Feb 13, 2006
Messages
19,041
#5
I don't think the human immune system is as much of a risk as much as these fake blood cells poisoning the body as they start to degenerate.

Unless they're designed to work WITH the body in a way that allows them to be broken down by the body's metabolic systems, getting them back OUT of the blood is going to be a big problem.
 
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