The Alfa Romeo Giulia Thread

FiestaST

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At least you lot are not spelling it as "Alpha Romeo".

Sies that is nasty!
 

asshat99

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Car And Driver's First Five Months With the Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio Have Been a Maintenance Nightmare

This didn't get posted for some reason.

Car And Driver has reported issues with its short term test Giulia in the past as well, and we had our own bout of issues when we tested the car last year, when Alfa had to take the car back to Michigan to diagnose and fix its issues. Consumer Reports, Motor Trend, Road & Track and more have also reported numerous issues with Giuia Quad test cars.
Seems all that 'passion' does not stretch to the engineering department. Like SA, the support also sounds like a bit of a joke.
 
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Jchan11hk

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Haha, Jalopnik again, they are still upset that Alfa didnt invite them to their launches.
People can get nasty
 

dews

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These Alfa's are hard work. Its like dating a Italian super model I guess. Its cool in public and everything but you have to work hard and put up with all their s%$t.

Jokes aside, I have recently fixed my damn broken gear lever for the second time in my 156. Its not like a Opel, where everything is hard metal, no, its just little fragile plastic ring that holds the horizontal slider in place. To get to that f$#king ring, i had to remove the dashboard and middle panels to get to it, and also, remove the passenger seat, exhausts, and bottom floor panels to get to the screws. I now have rock hard abs because of this, cannot complain.
 

FiestaST

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These Alfa's are hard work. Its like dating a Italian super model I guess. Its cool in public and everything but you have to work hard and put up with all their s%$t.

Jokes aside, I have recently fixed my damn broken gear lever for the second time in my 156. Its not like a Opel, where everything is hard metal, no, its just little fragile plastic ring that holds the horizontal slider in place. To get to that f$#king ring, i had to remove the dashboard and middle panels to get to it, and also, remove the passenger seat, exhausts, and bottom floor panels to get to the screws. I now have rock hard abs because of this, cannot complain.
Sorry, I laughed too much at this
 

Jchan11hk

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haha, both my Alfas are pretty reliable, better than my previous Opel Astra and VW Polo.
But ya, either you do your own mechanic work or you know someone that is super reliable.
Unfortunately, none of the dealerships are reliable in SA.
 

Ivan Leon

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Fiat Chrysler will be issuing a recall in the next few days for around 34,300 Alfa Romeo Giulia and Stelvio models with the 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine, as they may be at risk for fire due to inadequate overheating protection.

The recall document will be published under FCA ID UA4 and NHTSA ID 18V-636, and according to the description of the recall, the fire risk comes from the possibility of engine misfires.

The notice is not online yet.

The misfires may cause temperatures to rise in the catalytic converter which in turn could damage wiring and other components in the area.

Damage to these components and wiring can cause the engine to stall which has the potential to cause a crash due to loss of power.

In addition, the description states the following:

In some cases, an engine Malfunction Indicator Lamp (“MIL”) may illuminate, the engine may operate roughly, there may be temporary loss of engine power, or a burning odor may be noticeable prior to an engine stall or engine compartment fire. An engine compartment fire may result in an increased risk of injury to motor vehicle occupants or persons outside the vehicle.
According to the dealer instructions, they are to inspect the vehicles for a common set of diagnostic codes which include P0420, P0171, P2096, P2270, and P0299.

Once the scan report is completed and submitted to FCA they can get approval to proceed with the repair.

The approved repair for this issue involves a software calibration update to the Powertrain Control Module or PCM that will adjust fuel delivery control in order to prevent the misfires that could cause the overheating issues mentioned above.

The estimated repair time for the procedure is one hour but dealers are instructed to place owners in a loaner if their vehicle must be kept overnight.

According to the document the vehicles affected are the 2017 and 2018 Gulia, along with the 2018 Stelvio, and all are equipped with the 2.0-liter turbo engine.

The twin-turbo V6 models are not affected.

The recall only should be announced publicly by FCA soon and instruction letter to owners should follow shortly thereafter.

The new generation of Alfa Romeos—the brand’s return to the U.S. after two decades away—have seen some struggles with reliability over the past two years, and this latest recall probably isn’t going to help that reputation much.

The full recall notice is below.

UA4 Recall by patrick9512 on Scribd

https://jalopnik.com/alfa-romeo-giulia-and-stelvio-face-recall-for-loss-of-p-1829389488
 

smi

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These Alfa's are hard work. Its like dating a Italian super model I guess. Its cool in public and everything but you have to work hard and put up with all their s%$t.

Jokes aside, I have recently fixed my damn broken gear lever for the second time in my 156. Its not like a Opel, where everything is hard metal, no, its just little fragile plastic ring that holds the horizontal slider in place. To get to that f$#king ring, i had to remove the dashboard and middle panels to get to it, and also, remove the passenger seat, exhausts, and bottom floor panels to get to the screws. I now have rock hard abs because of this, cannot complain.
we still love our Alfa, right up to the point it commits suicide by fire.
 

asshat99

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Haha, Jalopnik again, they are still upset that Alfa didnt invite them to their launches.
People can get nasty
Actually they are reporting on car and drivers' woes. But sure, let's make a conspiracy theory to defend their chrysler engineering! They have dozens of overwhelmingly positive alfa articles in the last year. It was third on the list of their best 2017 cars.

AND THEY GOT GIVEN A CAR BY ALFA ROMEO FOR A WEEK'S TEST! So much for the little conspiracy theory.

Hope you get paid for being a brand apologist! Strange how the news posting on this board has a bit of bias! Not the first time with alfa articles.
 

Jchan11hk

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Haha, not exactly defending them, I just hate when people say AR are bad cars, but with no substantial facts to support. When the BMW 2.0 engine and VW group 1.8T engine uses tons of engine oil, no one says anything. Why can't people just appreciate other brands or they just have to bash one brand to boost their beloved brand? I learned to appreciate other car brands as well, but remain to have critical thinking and not just blindly listen to the main stream media or your friends in the pub for your car choices.
 

gifs

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At least FCA seems proactive in dealing with this potential fire issue, unlike Ford...
 

FiestaST

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Alfa Romeo Giulia and the 105: Targa Florio Australian Tribute - CarAdvice

 

FiestaST

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The story behind Alfa Romeo’s handling reinvention

Italian car maker reveals technical details of return-to-form Giulia and Stelvio models

The Giulia saloon and the Stelvio SUV have signalled a return to handling greatness for Alfa Romeo, with levels of precision and poise at the top of their classes.

Alfa chose not to delve into the engineering of the all-new chassis at the launches of both cars, but recently revealed more about their impressive underpinnings.

We've taken a look at four of the most significant technologies helping the brand reclaim its position as a maker of true drivers' cars.

1. Torque vectoring, limited-slip differentials

The transmission toolkit for the new chassis includes two rear axle differentials. There’s a conventional mechanical limited-slip version and an electronic torque vectoring unit equipped with two clutch packs to direct more torque to either rear wheel.

Vectoring more torque to the outside wheel reduces understeer by 17%, gives a 4% increase in lateral acceleration and increases agility by 20%. It can also have the opposite effect, helping to stabilise the car when the driver overcooks it. In the UK, limited-slip differentials are available in a performance pack on both models, while torque vectoring is standard on the 503bhp Q2 two-wheel-drive-only Giulia Quadrifoglio and Q4 all-wheel-drive Stelvio Quadrifoglio.

2. Brake-by-wire

Continental AG’s MKC1 brake-by-wire system makes its world debut in Alfa’s all-new Intelligent Braking System (IBS). Brembo brake calipers are still hydraulically operated rather than electro-mechanical but what’s changed is the front end. Instead of acting directly on a hydraulic master cylinder as usual, pressure on the brake pedal is transformed into hydraulic pressure by an electronic control module (ECU). One braking unit weighing 6kg replaces four weighing 10kg on a conventional system and takes up less space.

The driver gets a brake pedal feel that remains consistent and firm, however hot the brakes may get (so no spongy pedal on track). Standard calipers are aluminium four-piston on the front and cast-iron single piston on the rear. “The Quadrifoglio is designed to drive from home to work during the week and to go on track at the weekends,” says test co-ordinator Federico Langarelli Sellani, so rear calipers are also aluminium four-piston on those models. An optional four-wheel carboceramic (CCM) disc brake with sixpiston front calipers gives a generous weight saving of 5kg per wheel and colossal, inexhaustible braking performance.

3. Q4 on-demand all-wheel drive

Alfa Romeo teamed up with Magna Powertrain to design its own unique Q4 on-demand all-wheel-drive system, available only on the Stelvio in the UK. “The system is performance focused and normally delivers all the torque to the rear. This not only gives a rear-wheel-drive feel but is also fuel efficient,” says Q4 chief engineer Alessandro Avallone. At the heart of the system is an Active Transfer Case (ATC) housing a wet clutch pack to distribute torque to the front and rear axles. A compact front differential weighs only 11kg and the total weight of the system is less than 50kg.

An electronic brain, the Chassis Domain Control, measures the car’s yaw rate, wheel speeds, steering angle and throttle position. The clutch pack in the transfer case can react in less than 150 milliseconds to transfer up to 885lb ft torque to the front axle, the exact amount being continually varied “like a heartbeat”, says Avallone, to keep the car in balance.

The axle ratio in the rear is marginally lower, to mechanically drive more torque to the rear wheels. “That puts a lot of energy through the clutch pack but the thermal protection levels are set very high,” says Avallone. So you can have oversteering fun without the clutch pack overheating.

4. Patented Alfa link suspension

The lightweight chassis design is totally bespoke to the Giulia and Stelvio, says Stelvio chief engineer Filippo Epifani. “We had full freedom to design whatever we wanted. We designed the suspension to give the best performance, then the rest of the car was designed around it.” In total, 45% of all components are made from aluminium.

The front suspension is a double wishbone system, but with a difference. Grasp your shoulder with one hand and your arm resembles the upper triangular wishbone, the wheel hub attached at the point of your elbow by a single joint. This joint is split into two on the lower wishbone, crossing over in a scissor action as the wheel turns. “Through this unique movement the caster trail is constant, giving a progressive, linear steering feel,” explains Epifani.

At the rear, there’s a multi-link design comprising a broad, hollow aluminium lower wishbone and upper links that minimise changes in geometry as the suspension moves. The integral link best balances cornering rigidity, longitudinal flexibility for ride comfort and rear seat space. To help achieve a near-50:50 weight distribution, the rear subframe is aluminium on the Stelvio and steel on the lighter Giulia.

https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/industry/story-behind-alfa-romeo’s-handling-reinvention
 
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