The big problem with Intel's processor design

Jamie McKane

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The big problem with Intel's processor design

Intel recently unveiled its ninth generation of Intel Core desktop processors, which offer increased performance over 8th-gen chips in addition to increased core counts and clock speeds.

This line-up of processors includes the manufacturer's new Core i9-9900K, which boasts eight physical cores and sixteen threads, and is labelled by Intel as the "best processor for gaming" on the market.
 

Genisys

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As a Consumer I can't give a rats ass if a CPU is 14nm or 10nm, as long as it works I'm ok with it. It isn't about brand either, if a CPU supports what I need it to do, I'll buy it.
 

Daruk

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As a Consumer I can't give a rats ass if a CPU is 14nm or 10nm, as long as it works I'm ok with it. It isn't about brand either, if a CPU supports what I need it to do, I'll buy it.
Well that's just it. It does work, just not as well as they intended.
 

Swa

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The biggest improvements that stem from moving to a smaller process node are increased power efficiency and transistor density, allowing for increased performance at the same power consumption as the previous generation, or lower power usage at the same performance level.
Also the possibility Intel might be first to market with a quantum processor, without necessarily intending it to be one.
 

Ancalagon

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Also the possibility Intel might be first to market with a quantum processor, without necessarily intending it to be one.
Um, no. That isn't how it works. You can't accidentally make a quantum processor by endlessly shrinking the die size.

In any case, Intel is now behind the other major foundries such as Samsung and TSMC. This is the problem for Intel - it isn't so much that their processors are bad, it is that they now find themselves BEHIND in the technology race. Intel has always been at the forefront of processor manufacturing technology, but now they are behind.

For instance - next year AMD will release 7nm CPUs when Intel is still on 14nm. This will give AMD a big advantage in terms of area and performance. AMD and Intel are fairly close now, so when AMD releases its next generation Zen CPU manufactured on a 7nm process, we might see an AMD CPU regain the performance crown.
 

Neoprod

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Intel recently unveiled its ninth generation of Intel Core desktop processors, which offer increased performance over 8th-gen chips in addition to increased core counts and clock speeds.
The "in addition" is interesting...I was expecting the (marginally) increased performance to come solely from clock speed and additional cores. It's still Coffee Lake just with better TIM and slightly higher TDP - are there improvements in IPC?
 

CataclysmZA

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The increased number of cores does make them more suitable for certain applications, however, although most gamers would be fine with a quad-core processor instead of a hexa-core option.
Oh dear.
 
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