This simple infographic explains how broadband speeds compare

abzo

Honorary Master
Joined
Nov 18, 2008
Messages
27,855
#3
The second infographic doesn't make sense to me though. Sure, the large truck could carry more data but the car would be faster.
 

moklet

Expert Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2005
Messages
3,703
#4
They forgot the SA Taxi, you can overload it with data, break all speed rules and never stop.
 

Tharaxis

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 9, 2003
Messages
502
#5
It looks nice, but as far as imparting actual information (factual information) it falls pretty short. Especially the second infographic which seems to omit the relationship between the rice and the actual transfer of data. Looking at both infographics one after the other, I could make the leap logically that carrying a bowl of rice in a car is the same as carrying a bag of rice in a car (since it seems to imply a correlation of size of vehicle to speed of vehicle) which we know of course is not the case.

The first infographic is "okay" (although still very vague and I suspect not really accurate in scale - which means as an accurate visualisation tool it likely falls short), but the second, especially when taken in conjunction with the first, doesn't really work all that well.

I would have maybe have used the concept of "bandwidth" to have been correlated against the rice as scooping rice from one container into another. The bigger the scoop, the more you can "transfer" into the other bag and the faster it can be filled up. If you have lots of small scoops you can scoop just as fast, if not faster than if you had one big scoop, demonstrating parallel workloads, etc. (although the described analogy would likely need some cleanup and revision to actually get working).
 
Joined
Jan 24, 2007
Messages
70,301
#6
The second infographic doesn't make sense to me though. Sure, the large truck could carry more data but the car would be faster.
It looks nice, but as far as imparting actual information (factual information) it falls pretty short. Especially the second infographic which seems to omit the relationship between the rice and the actual transfer of data. Looking at both infographics one after the other, I could make the leap logically that carrying a bowl of rice in a car is the same as carrying a bag of rice in a car (since it seems to imply a correlation of size of vehicle to speed of vehicle) which we know of course is not the case.

The first infographic is "okay" (although still very vague and I suspect not really accurate in scale - which means as an accurate visualisation tool it likely falls short), but the second, especially when taken in conjunction with the first, doesn't really work all that well.

I would have maybe have used the concept of "bandwidth" to have been correlated against the rice as scooping rice from one container into another. The bigger the scoop, the more you can "transfer" into the other bag and the faster it can be filled up. If you have lots of small scoops you can scoop just as fast, if not faster than if you had one big scoop, demonstrating parallel workloads, etc. (although the described analogy would likely need some cleanup and revision to actually get working).
I'm assuming it's the same time-interval measures, which addresses this concern sufficiently. Also the technologies don't dictate speed other than upper limits. They can be provisioned on slower sync rates, so to make assumptions about speed would be onerous given the context and purpose of this comparison. It could also be a drag racer truck under the hood vs an Uno Cento 1995...:D
 

midnightcaller

Expert Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2010
Messages
2,022
#7
The 2nd info graphic does not make sense.

It may have made sense to show faster modes of transport as opposed to larger volume modes of transport.
 
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