Where to study with poor Maths marks?

RedViking

Nord of the South
Joined
Feb 23, 2012
Messages
19,029
#21
I met a guy from the UK during my travels, who runs a SaaS company he started, currently operating at $1,000,000+ annual recurring revenue. He studied music and then somehow got into tech.

__

On that note, I also met an 18 year old Brazilian kid who dropped out of high school (and ran away from home) at 16 and now runs a development agency and employs other developers.


Relevant qualifications will probably make things easier. But with the right mindset and hard work you can become anything in the Tech industry regardless of your background.
Tech is one of the few industries where experience and expertise are valued more than qualifications cause they wanna know, "Can you actually ship that code?" and are you familiar with the latest and greatest programming languages, frameworks, etc and not what you learnt in University 5 years ago.
Can you please meet me?
 

Rharia

Active Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2018
Messages
44
#22
In my case I was with some good marks here but I was not able to do some computer programming at all. But I tried all online courses I was able to find and that train get me going really. I couldn't understand anything here really. With some bad marks you can still do programing, math is not that needed there.
 

Johnatan56

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 23, 2013
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24,535
#23
In my case I was with some good marks here but I was not able to do some computer programming at all. But I tried all online courses I was able to find and that train get me going really. I couldn't understand anything here really. With some bad marks you can still do programing, math is not that needed there.
As said, it depends on what you're doing.
You don't need a linguistics degree to write an essay, just that it generally means you can write better essays and can do so at a higher standard.

Most programming doesn't "need" maths, it needs a logical thought process and that you follow best practice and all will be good.

Most web developers don't need to know how to make something display using assembly or complex calculations etc, they use ready made tools by those who studied the maths/other requirements, and as long as you can logically break down the business process and use the built tools, all's fine.

IT is a huge field, with many, many branches. If you ask someone what they do and reply "IT", that's the same as saying they do "cars".
 

WaxLyrical

Honorary Master
Joined
Oct 20, 2011
Messages
18,876
#25
This depends where you want to go. Based on your Bsc Informatics, you're not in a job where you would "need" math. IT is a supporting occupation, there are many different needs/facets in the industry, e.g. cguy's job would require math, yours doesn't, which is the joy of IT. :p
But colleges want to see that math mark so they know you're hard worker, otherwise any slacker will apply for Bsc Info and get in.
 

Johnatan56

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 23, 2013
Messages
24,535
#26
But colleges want to see that math mark so they know you're hard worker, otherwise any slacker will apply for Bsc Info and get in.
Lol, I wouldn't consider more than 60% a very difficult achievement, plus you still get considered if under that if average is high enough among everything else, you'd probably be able to get in with a mark in the 50's:
1558277064098.png
1558277096374.png
https://www.up.ac.za/media/shared/360/Faculty Brochures 2015 2016/2017-2018 Brochures/undergraduate-programme-info-2018-final-pdf-08.12.2016.zp104830.pdf

UFS has lower maths requirements but does have a physics requirement:
1558277276918.png
https://www.ufs.ac.za/prospective/c...icultural-sciences/bsc-information-technology
I could have gone there instead, would have been able to get in easily, but didn't want to leave CT lol.
 

WaxLyrical

Honorary Master
Joined
Oct 20, 2011
Messages
18,876
#27
Lol, I wouldn't consider more than 60% a very difficult achievement, plus you still get considered if under that if average is high enough among everything else, you'd probably be able to get in with a mark in the 50's:
View attachment 660172
View attachment 660174
https://www.up.ac.za/media/shared/360/Faculty Brochures 2015 2016/2017-2018 Brochures/undergraduate-programme-info-2018-final-pdf-08.12.2016.zp104830.pdf

UFS has lower maths requirements but does have a physics requirement:
View attachment 660178
https://www.ufs.ac.za/prospective/c...icultural-sciences/bsc-information-technology
I could have gone there instead, would have been able to get in easily, but didn't want to leave CT lol.
Yes pure math but math Lit which is what the OP has?
 

cbrunsdonza

Honorary Master
Joined
Jun 21, 2008
Messages
13,383
#30
I am now worried about what your job entails. :p
(since I can't think of why you need to know binary for finance)
Anybody working on a finance system needs to understand mantissa and exponent, along with its impact.

Understanding the risks of of transmitting a floating point across zero MQ using protocol buffers.

I would say knowing binary is rather important.
 

zippy

Executive Member
Joined
May 31, 2005
Messages
9,739
#31
Anybody working on a finance system needs to understand mantissa and exponent, along with its impact.

Understanding the risks of of transmitting a floating point across zero MQ using protocol buffers.

I would say knowing binary is rather important.
Most of that level of code in finance is already in tried and tested libraries. No need to reinvent it. There should already be unit tests and regression tests in place to make sure nobody breaks it. At that level, the math doesn’t change. If you involved in maintaining or trying fix errors in that code, make sure your cv is up to date because finance co you work for isn’t gonna last very long. Most of the coding work in finance systems is around constantly changing business processes, new products and reacting to regulators.
 
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