The old Microsoft Edge is officially dead

Microsoft has officially ended support for its legacy Edge browser, the company announced in a blog post.

It has been over a year since Microsoft launched its new Chromium-based Edge browser for desktop, and the company has quickly replaced the old Microsoft Edge with the new version via Windows updates.

While the legacy version of Microsoft Edge remains functional, it will no longer receive security updates going forward.

“Last August, we announced that Microsoft Edge Legacy desktop application support would end on March 9, 2021 as part of this transition to the new Microsoft Edge,” Microsoft said.

“Today, Microsoft Edge Legacy desktop application support officially ends, and it will no longer receive future security updates.”

“Additionally, we announced that the now out-of-support Microsoft Edge Legacy desktop application will be removed and replaced with the new Microsoft Edge when customers apply April’s Windows 10 cumulative monthly security update (or ‘B’ release),” the company said.

This means that Windows 10 users will automatically see their legacy version of Microsoft Edge replaced by the new Chromium version as part of next month’s operating system update.

“We do not recommend skipping this update. Windows cumulative monthly security updates provide critical updates to the Windows 10 operating system. Your Windows 10 defaults and personalization, such as your default browser or taskbar pins, will be respected (e.g. if you had Microsoft Edge Legacy pinned to the taskbar, this would be replaced with the new Microsoft Edge),” Microsoft said.

Auto-update criticism

Many users were initially upset at the roll-out of the new Chromium-based version of Microsoft Edge, stating that the switch was forcefully and intrusively imposed upon them.

Users of multiple versions of the operating system – including Windows 7, Windows 8 and Windows 10 – were frustrated by Edge performing several unrequested actions after its installation.

After the new version of the browser was installed, it launched itself on startup and the operating system showed a full-screen pop-up explaining the features of the new browser.

It remains to be seen whether Microsoft will take a similarly aggressive approach when it replaces legacy versions of its browser with Chromium-based Edge next month.

Now read: You should update your iPhone and Mac now

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The old Microsoft Edge is officially dead