2015 VW Polo Brake replacement?

kombi-man

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So after saving myself upwards of 8 to 9 Grand from the VW Stealership to replace my Polo's brakes, I'll be doing the job hopefully in the next few days. Fine with the expected process as it's discs all round, and I'm replacing the discs\rotors with new Bosch units as well. Is there any possible "issues" might encounter from the Polo\golf guru's to help me prepare?

Looks like once the pads and calipers off, the disk is only held on with one torques screw. Any specific oiling or greasing needed?

thanks chaps

regards

Alan

*** UPDATE: Parts List for future Reference ***

Parts purchased from Diesel-Electric on Montague Gardens Bosch brand

Front Disc: 0986478853 - R495-00 ea excl VAT
Rear Disc: 0986478868 - R265-00 ea excl VAT

Front Pads: 0986424364 - R492.11 p/pair excl VAT
Rear Pads: 0986461769 - R 295.00 p/pair excl VAT

Total cost: R 2 649.95 Incl VAT
VW Quoted me R 5 987.36 Incl VAT For ATE brand.
 
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WesleyDB

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So after saving myself upwards of 8 to 9 Grand from the VW Stealership to replace my Polo's brakes, I'll be doing the job hopefully in the next few days. Fine with the expected process as it's discs all round, and I'm replacing the discs\rotors with new Bosch units as well. Is there any possible "issues" might encounter from the Polo\golf guru's to help me prepare?

Looks like once the pads and calipers off, the disk is only held on with one torques screw. Any specific oiling or greasing needed?

thanks chats

regards

Alan

Watch this video it will show you the points that need copper slip. Also would add a bit of copper slip to the part of the disc that mounts against the hub and a bit on the screw that holds the disc on. (not essential, but it will make your job easier the next time you doing it)
 

RonSwanson

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Drain the brake fluid reservoir before starting. If you don't, there's a good chance that it will spill all over the engine bay when pushing the pistons back to accomodate the size of the new pads and disc.
 

Mekon

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Are you replacing the rear discs as well? Just wondering because they rarely need replacing, especially on a 5 year old car.
 

Tman*

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Drain the brake fluid reservoir before starting. If you don't, there's a good chance that it will spill all over the engine bay when pushing the pistons back to accomodate the size of the new pads and disc.
Good tip here, but as stated you can just remove a bit of fluid from the tank with a turkey baster or syringe (obviously make sure its new and clean and dont put the old fluid back). Once the job is complete, top up the tank to the max level with new fluid.

Get some brake cleaner and a steel wire brush and clean the hub and all the brackets properly before reinstalling anything. Apply copper grease to all the required areas.

Most important of all please be sure to secure your car property with jack stands - dont work under your car while suspended on a jack only.

Edit : you don't mention pads in your post? I presume you doing that too?
 

kombi-man

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Yep, full replacement all round.. The car has a strange (Not a judder" but a very gentle "jerking" sensation when braking, and I can only put it down to possibly a warped disc, or a brake binding then releasing ever so slightly. So, easiest is to do them all. Plus, I think the original owners drove the pads to metal, as the discs feel horrible.

So having not explained, I have done a few classic car rebuilds, (356 and my 74 Kombi camper), and a few bike builds. Am reasonably comfortable with mechanics, and as such, don't think this should present too much of a problem.

I'll be using a syringe to remove some of the fluid so when I expand the pistons, the fluid shouldn't overflow.. But will jam some tissue paper\hand towel there as well in case. the Copperslip, thanks WesleyDB, will get some this morning (hopefully).

Regards

Alan
 

RonSwanson

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No need to drain it, just remove a little, draining it is just asking for unnecessary trouble.
That's what I said, drain the reservoir, not necessarily the whole system. Although sometimes, if you see the colour of the fluid gunk which surfaces in the reservoir, you'll be tempted to flush the whole system by bleeding it. I would focus on one thing at a time though, get the pads and rotors changed, test properly and then do a flush if necessary.
 

thechamp

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That's what I said, drain the reservoir, not necessarily the whole system. Although sometimes, if you see the colour of the fluid gunk which surfaces in the reservoir, you'll be tempted to flush the whole system by bleeding it. I would focus on one thing at a time though, get the pads and rotors changed, test properly and then do a flush if necessary.
Yeah, it's not a bad idea to also replace the brake fluid while at it.
 

Tman*

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The car has a strange (Not a judder" but a very gentle "jerking" sensation when braking, and I can only put it down to possibly a warped disc, or a brake binding then releasing ever so slightly. So, easiest is to do them all. Plus, I think the original owners drove the pads to metal, as the discs feel horrible.

I hope your problem is fixed by replacing the disks. With that said your problem can lie elsewhere. I had a similar issue of a wobble at high speed braking, and the issue was not resolved after I replaced disks. It ended up being control and stabilizer links that was shot
 

kombi-man

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Thanks, this feeling I can feel on the pedal, plus, the cars only got 50 K on it, but let's see.
Turns out the pads are the wrong ones, so had to abort today, and will exchange tomorrow, and hit it on Saturday.

thanks guys.
 

RonSwanson

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I hope your problem is fixed by replacing the disks. With that said your problem can lie elsewhere. I had a similar issue of a wobble at high speed braking, and the issue was not resolved after I replaced disks. It ended up being control and stabilizer links that was shot
If the rotors are still within spec, and in good nick (no crax) you don't have to replace them, just skim. There's a school of thought that suggests that even brand new rotors need a light skim, just in case some dude dropped the box in the warehouse.
 

thechamp

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Thanks, this feeling I can feel on the pedal, plus, the cars only got 50 K on it, but let's see.
Turns out the pads are the wrong ones, so had to abort today, and will exchange tomorrow, and hit it on Saturday.

thanks guys.
Goldwagen?
 

kombi-man

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No, Diesel Electric in Montague Gardens. And Bosch, I don't like the ATE brand, I think it's soft.. But, we'll find out. Ive already purchased everything, so, it's all being replaced.. Will be good to go for another 150 000 km's.. lol
 

SauRoNZA

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Open the brake fluid reservoir and put a cloth around it in case of any spillage.

Otherwise it’s pretty straight forward.

Copper slip on the back of the pads so they don’t squeak. And don’t bend the clips in to make them fit, they’ll be loose forever and bother the **** out of you every time you reverse.

Brake cleaner on the new parts that go in and the old parts that go back.

If doing the back as well might be some car specific tricks for the hand brake.
 
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SauRoNZA

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If the rotors are still within spec, and in good nick (no crax) you don't have to replace them, just skim. There's a school of thought that suggests that even brand new rotors need a light skim, just in case some dude dropped the box in the warehouse.
Skimming at a shop usually costs more than simply replacing yourself.

However only 50k on the car and needing disc replacements is insane.

Did mine at double that on a performance car.

And there’s always some cookoo “school of thought” doing unnecessary ****. Just take the first 50km easy and all will bed in nicely.
 

gamer16

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Skimming at a shop usually costs more than simply replacing yourself.

However only 50k on the car and needing disc replacements is insane.

Did mine at double that on a performance car.

And there’s always some cookoo “school of thought” doing unnecessary ****. Just take the first 50km easy and all will bed in nicely.
^This

Brother in law had warped disks on his E63 M6, as they are enormous expensive BMW parts the local dealers wanted around 30k, so he went the skimming route, first made it slightly better then they took off a bit more which made it Worse, so much so it became damn near undrivable and cost about 12K

Did some searching, got a brand new OEM set with pads and replacement lines from das Germans for 10k plus shipping.
 

SauRoNZA

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Total cost: R 2 649.95 Incl VAT
VW Quoted me R 5 987.36 Incl VAT For ATE brand.
Sounds good.

I remember paying about the same for original ATE parts when I did it, but was about 5 years ago.

Distinctly remember buying a jack and wheel spanner and some other extras with the parts for almost exactly half of what I was quoted by a independent not even a dealer.
 

kombi-man

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And, overall, took me just over 2 hours to do this job. They were suggesting 6 to 8 hours. So, its all good when something that WOULD have cost 10 K only costs 2.5K and a bit of labour.
 
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