2018 Nissan Leaf (2nd Generation)

pinball wizard

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So any ETA on LEAF e+ in South Africa?

If it's the equivalent of R650k in England, who the **** is going to fork out over R750k (and I'm being generous here, it'll probably be over R800k) for that?

I mean it's retarded enough already that the i3 is around R700k to start with, that surely doesn't mean other manufacturers should be aiming at that as a starting point?
 

chubster

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If it's the equivalent of R650k in England, who the **** is going to fork out over R750k (and I'm being generous here, it'll probably be over R800k) for that?

I mean it's retarded enough already that the i3 is around R700k to start with, that surely doesn't mean other manufacturers should be aiming at that as a starting point?

If we as South Africans show more interest, the more car options will be presented to us. Even if we are not buying it immediately. The same goes for fibre, if you show interest in fibre in your area, and get more people to show interest, the more the companies will start to offer options and compete with each other.

Unfortunately as things are right now, only a select few in the pyramid at the top can afford it, but let them make it popular so that the average middle class person can also afford it.
 

FiestaST

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Extended-range Nissan Leaf to make mainstream production

Leaf with 62kWh battery will arrive after limited edition's success, although the regular 40kWh car will be the better seller

Nissan will launch a mainstream extended-range Leaf, following the success of the limited-run model it revealed in January.

The Leaf 3.Zero e+ Limited Edition replaces the standard 40kWh battery pack with a 62kWh unit, yielding a WLTP range of 239 miles – an increase of 62.

Ken Ramirez, Nissan Europe’s sales and marketing boss told Autocar that 1000 orders were taken in the first day and that 3000 had been reached by mid-January. Just 5000 units were allocated for Europe.

“It sold very quickly, and it means we have to recalibrate our total volume expectation for the year," Ramirez said.

“It’s not just a battery but also a high specification. The fact it sold so quickly is a good test of the appetite for this market.”

Ramirez didn't confirm the sales expectation for a full-production-run 62kWh version of the Leaf but said that he expected the 40kWh Leaf to remain the better seller.

“The knowledge of the consumer means you don’t necessarily have to have higher range,” he explained, adding that range is only consumers' third purchase consideration, behind the car's specification and green credentials.

Talking about Nissan's UK sales last year, which fell 32% year on year, Ramirez said: “Our UK performance is particularly affected by a number of elements. But from an EV perspective, we are number one in the UK, with a 36% market share. That gives an indication of where we’re going.”

Nissan is due to launch an electric SUV in 2020, inspired by the IMx concept shown in 2017, as it strives to keep its position as leader of the EV market amid a host of companies launching competitors, including the Hyundai Kona Electric and Kia e-Niro.

https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/new-cars/extended-range-nissan-leaf-make-mainstream-production
 

eg2505

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where is the extension cord:ROFL:

seriously EV's in SA are a bad idea, imagine getting stuck with no juice somewhere like stilfontein
wait 8 + hours to charge from a 220v socket.
 

orin76

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where is the extension cord:ROFL:

seriously EV's in SA are a bad idea, imagine getting stuck with no juice somewhere like stilfontein
wait 8 + hours to charge from a 220v socket.
If you often need to do more than 100 to 150km in a day, an electric car does not make sense unless you have access to an internal combustion vehicle as a second car.

For us urban dwellers it can make a lot of sense once the purchase prices drop a bit more.
 

Currantly

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seriously EV's in SA are a bad idea, imagine getting stuck with no juice somewhere like stilfontein
wait 8 + hours to charge from a 220v socket.

Plenty of people run out of petrol every day in SA. The navigation & route planning in EV's is designed to avoid the situation you mentioned. When EV's start taking off in SA we will have the advantage of having the latest charging infrastructure installed. Some manufacturers already have some kind of network. Hopefully they'll all be compatible with each other.

If you often need to do more than 100 to 150km in a day, an electric car does not make sense unless you have access to an internal combustion vehicle as a second car.

Plenty of EV's have more than 150km range.

"According to Tesla officials, the Model 3 Standard Range version delivers an EPA-rated all-electric range of 220 miles (354 km) and the Long Range version delivers 325 miles (523 km)."
 

eg2505

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Plenty of people run out of petrol every day in SA. The navigation & route planning in EV's is designed to avoid the situation you mentioned. When EV's start taking off in SA we will have the advantage of having the latest charging infrastructure installed. Some manufacturers already have some kind of network. Hopefully they'll all be compatible with each other.

until you realize one needs to walk around with a RFID card and need to tap that to start the charging process.
I foresee a problem there, as firstly one can be tracked with that, and secondly, one can limit it to "their" chargers.

I actually foresee lots of manufacturers saying, only our chargers will work with our cars, we wont make a common charger.
kind of like vehicle airbags, as one has to get the original airbags for X vehicle from the manufacturer,
and that alone costs a arm and a leg. so much so that cars with popped airbags are written off, even though they are probably fine.

so yes, soon enough, only Jaguar chargers will work with Jaguars, and only Nissan chargers will work with Nissan.
 

Currantly

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until you realize one needs to walk around with a RFID card and need to tap that to start the charging process.
I foresee a problem there, as firstly one can be tracked with that, and secondly, one can limit it to "their" chargers.

I actually foresee lots of manufacturers saying, only our chargers will work with our cars, we wont make a common charger.
kind of like vehicle airbags, as one has to get the original airbags for X vehicle from the manufacturer,
and that alone costs a arm and a leg. so much so that cars with popped airbags are written off, even though they are probably fine.

so yes, soon enough, only Jaguar chargers will work with Jaguars, and only Nissan chargers will work with Nissan.

This is where the government needs to step in and say: 'you need to agree to a standard & progression timeline, and stick to it' -like when mobile device manufacturers agreed on the micro USB charging standard (now advanced to type-C). It should have actually been done on a global scale already, but we can only hope. Charging EV's shouldn't be something like the format wars (VHS/Betamax, Blu-ray/HD-DVD) where people are left stuck with a less functional or unsupported device.

edit: most people should be charging from home/work, most of the time, with 'superchargers' only being required for long distance travel
 

eg2505

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This is where the government needs to step in and say: 'you need to agree to a standard & progression timeline, and stick to it' -like when mobile device manufacturers agreed on the micro USB charging standard (now advanced to type-C). It should have actually been done on a global scale already, but we can only hope. Charging EV's shouldn't be something like the format wars (VHS/Betamax, Blu-ray/HD-DVD) where people are left stuck with a less functional or unsupported device.

edit: most people should be charging from home/work, most of the time, with 'superchargers' only being required for long distance travel

problem comes when one sees what the government and manufacturer's did to something like the GM EV1,
utterly destroy is, and crush the remaining ones, so nobody tries to build more.

Manufacturers and governments know the huge profits they make from conventional cars are so great
they will fight to protect them. in any way they can.

so I see them definitely NOT making a common charge plug,or common parts like batteries,
I see them, charging people for using their cards at EV charge points, and installing GPS trackers on the car to tax you on distance driven.
I also see then putting cool but worthless technology in EV's to pump up the price so the profits on an EV are vast.
or making them so hard to fix, most people trade in their Tesla for a conventional car, as soon as the warrenty is up.

dont forget EV's are nothing new, indeed they were popular back when the Ford model T was around, problem was no National Grids existed back then.
so they faded into obscurity, or niche applications like the golf cart or milk float.

can they make a resurface? I still dont know, if they came out with a simple,cheap reliable EV that anybody with some common sense could fix,
and made it cheap enough anybody could afford one, a model T if you will,

I sure other manufacturer's will all at once switch, and the rest will follow almost as quickly.
maybe then a common charge plug and a infrastructure will get set up.

but here locally, as in the rest of the world, EV's are a niche product, until they become vastly cheaper, more reliable and able to be fixed by Sipho in a shed, like the model T or a Citi golf.
 

FiestaST

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Nissan SA is not that far behind at least. Only recently Australia got the Gen 2 Leaf.
 

FiestaST

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Nissan Leaf e+ Tekna 2019 UK review

Should I buy one?

Ah yes, the price: perhaps the biggest stumbling block with the Leaf e+. With Nissan offering the uprated powertrain only with top-flight Tekna trim, you’re looking at a car that would be within striking distance of £40,000 were it not for the £3500 government grant.

Adding around £5000 to the list price of the regular Leaf doesn’t seem too outrageous, but it limits the car’s appeal to those who really need the performance or whose range anxiety really gets the better of them.

Of more significance is the e+'s placing among rivals. While you can have a Leaf today, those prepared to join the waiting list for a Kona Electric will get a better-value, longer-range proposition.

And that's before considering all manner of new arrivals - the Peugeot e-2008 and Volkswagen ID 3, to name but a few - that are expected to arrive with prices starting below £30,000. Even the Tesla Model 3 is only a couple of thousand more. Finance deals aren’t particularly remarkable for the Leaf e+, either.

Regardless of this car's decent performance statistics and strong equipment tally, it doesn’t offer the dynamic sophistication or interior quality you'd expect at this price point.

Nissan Leaf e+ Tekna specification

Where Berkshire, UK Price £36,245 (after £3500 government grant) On sale Now Engine Electric motor Power 214bhp Torque 251lb ft Gearbox Single-speed automatic Kerb weight 1731kg Top speed 98mph 0-62mph 7.3sec Range 239 miles (WLTP) CO2 0g/km (WLTP) Rivals Hyundai Kona Electric, BMW i3

https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-review/nissan/leaf/first-drives/nissan-leaf-e-tekna-2019-uk-review

7-nissan-leaf-64kw-2019-uk-fd-dashboard.jpg 2-nissan-leaf-64kw-2019-uk-fd-hero-rear.jpg 1-nissan-leaf-64kw-2019-uk-fd-hero-front.jpg 6-nissan-leaf-64kw-2019-uk-fd-cabin.jpg 13-nissan-leaf-64kw-2019-uk-fd-otr-side.jpg 10-nissan-leaf-64kw-2019-uk-fd-gear-selector.jpg 9-nissan-leaf-64kw-2019-uk-fd-infotainment.jpg 8-nissan-leaf-64kw-2019-uk-fd-instruments.jpg
 
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