ANC to help Mugabe win election?

killadoob

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But based on your criteria there, they'd have to do the same in at least 50 African countries, most of South America and parts of Asia. A few European countries as well.

Name me a few countries in africa with a leader like mugabe. Off the top of your head please, let's try not to include countries locked in civil war.
 

LazyLion

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ANC ratifies support for Mugabe's Zanu-PF

http://mg.co.za/article/2011-12-12-anc-ratifies-support-for-mugabes-zanupf

The ruling African National Congress on Monday confirmed weekend reports it would be supporting Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe's party during general elections in 2012.
"We are consolidating our relationship as a former liberation movement and yes we are supporting them," ANC spokesperson Keith Khoza told the Mail & Guardian.
According to media reports, ANC secretary general Gwede Mantashe told the Zanu-PF national conference in Bulawayo last week that his party will support the Zimbabwean ruling party in retaining power next year.
But Khoza said the ANC's supporting role will "mutually benefit all Zimbabweans".
"Our approach in helping former liberation movements is in the hopes they will improve. We need an approach that will allow political parties in Zimbabwe to be sensitive to the needs of the people," he said.
The nature of the support the ANC would provide remains unclear at this stage, but it would not be a financial contribution.
"They will decide how best to utilise our skills: Be it electioneering, strategising, monitoring and so on," Khoza added.
The ANC is the only one out several liberation movements at the conference to openly declare support for Zanu-PF.
Former president Thabo Mbeki brokered a power-sharing agreement between Zanu-PF and its rival Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) following disputed elections in 2008.
The agreement saw MDC president Morgan Tsvangirai become prime minister in a government of national unity -- something Mugabe now describes as "unworkable".
"This inclusive government must now see its death. It must come to an end, and we must dig its grave. Let us now start preparing for elections," Mugabe told Zanu-PF supporters as he closed the party's conference.
No date has been set for elections, with the MDC maintaining a trip to the polls is impossible.
Confused roles
The ANC's support could be construed as confusion of roles as President Jacob Zuma currently serves as the Southern African Development Community's (SADC) political mediator in Zimbabwe.
But the presidency moved quickly on Monday to dispel any perceived bias towards Zanu-PF in the on-going efforts at achieving a workable political solution in Zimbabwe.
"I am sure the Zimbabweans can expect and trust President Zuma to act in an impartial manner in his role as SADC mediator," Zuma's spokesperson Mac Maharaj told the M&G.
Maharaj would not elaborate on how Zuma plans to balance his mediation efforts as state and party president, but maintained any confusion "would be clarified within the ANC".
Khoza echoed Maharaj's sentiment, maintaining the ANC's support strictly lent itself to "party interests, distinct from government".

Hopefully this will come back to bite the ANC. If this election is roundly condemned by the rest of the world as a rigged election, then the ANC's support for it will be seen as support for an illegitimate government.
 

Ou grote

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Name me a few countries in africa with a leader like mugabe. Off the top of your head please, let's try not to include countries locked in civil war.

What do you mean "like" Mugabe?
You mean elected in a free and fair election, that was accepted by the South African government?

I still don't understand why you want him removed by the west.
 

Ou grote

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I must say I also cannot spot the difference between the two. Please help.

One is just mouthing off about a regime change, the other is using his country's resources to change a regime.

One got charged, one won't be charged.
 

killadoob

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What do you mean "like" Mugabe?
You mean elected in a free and fair election, that was accepted by the South African government?

I still don't understand why you want him removed by the west.

I don't, the west would never remove him, there is nothing beneficial for the west in zimbabwe so they won't do a thing. I was just pointing out a revolution will be useless as the west won't intervene.
 

RexxGrim

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Seems my dyslexia is flaring up again. I read the title as

ANC to help Mugabe with erection. :wtf:
 

Ou grote

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I don't, the west would never remove him, there is nothing beneficial for the west in zimbabwe so they won't do a thing. I was just pointing out a revolution will be useless as the west won't intervene.

Well then what are you on about?

There is no reason to remove him and you want the west to remove him?
Makes no sense???
 

killadoob

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Well then what are you on about?

There is no reason to remove him and you want the west to remove him?
Makes no sense???

Did you see someone's post about a revolution. Then read mine and it may make some sense.
 

killadoob

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Ah.
You saying that if there was an uprising the West would not get involved with their armies?

Indeed, think iran and bahrain. That is about as far as they will get. Couple days of protests, hundreds arrested/killed uprising done. Granted it worked in egypt but then they didn't have a few people getting involved nor did the egypian army kill people.
 

Ou grote

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Indeed, think iran and bahrain. That is about as far as they will get. Couple days of protests, hundreds arrested/killed uprising done. Granted it worked in egypt but then they didn't have a few people getting involved nor did the egypian army kill people.

I don't think they would interfere there, not because of oil, but Zim aren't really relevant or a threat to them.
Don't think they have suicide bombers either.

They had a deal going with the AU that Africans would sort out their own problems and the West would just send money
http://www.polity.org.za/article/mb...e-following-their-meeting-09072003-2003-07-09.
That probably hasn't really worked out as planned...

And if it was about oil, Angola, Nigeria and a few other countries would have been invaded long ago.

Haven't read this whole thing yet, but here seems to be what the US are planning in Africa.
http://www.africom.mil/AboutAFRICOM.asp
So who knows, I may yet get to see F16's, F22's etc. :)
 

Shibal

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Blood diamonds will pay for Robert Mugabe's election terror campaign

The ANC comrades are most likely after their share of the blood diamonds, the dirty basturds.

Blood diamonds will pay for Robert Mugabe's election terror campaign, campaigners warn

As polling looms in Zimbabwe, critics condemn 'utter failure' of the Kimberley Process, set up to control global sale of conflict gems

Conflict diamonds are to be used to fund a new campaign of violence by President Robert Mugabe's regime against his political opponents in Zimbabwe as elections loom.

Environmental experts are blaming the "utter failure" of the Kimberley Process, set up in 2003 to monitor conflict diamonds and stop them reaching mainstream outlets, for allowing Mugabe and his allies to siphon off millions of dollars in profits from Zimbabwean diamonds, which have now gone on sale.

There has been consistent criticism of the Kimberley Process since the decision to lift a ban on the sale of the gems from the newly discovered Marange fields in Zimbabwe, despite evidence of human rights abuses and killings by Mugabe's soldiers. Human Rights Watch claimed the decision "betrayed the trust" of miners, consumers and retailers.

This weekend, Anjin Investments, a Chinese-led venture in Zimbabwe in partnership with Mugabe's government, announced it was now the world's biggest diamond producer, with a stockpile of three million carats to sell. The company, which thanked the Kimberley Process for its backing, is funding a new military college in the country.

Reports from Zimbabwe suggest the feared Central Information Organisation (CIO), Mugabe's secret police, is flush with cash, and has bought hundreds of vehicles and weapons from China in recent months. Salaries have been increased and thousands of new officers are being trained, raising concerns that they will be used to intimidate voters in next year's elections.

That is despite the official reduction in the CIO's budgets after the finance minister, a member of the Movement for Democratic Change, blocked extra funding in protest at its political bias towards Mugabe's Zanu-PF party. Campaigners also suspect many tens of millions of dollars from diamond production are bypassing official channels into the pockets of corrupt politicians and businessmen.

Mike Davis, of the campaign group Global Witness, which walked out of the KP over its decision on Zimbabwe this month, said no safeguards remain over the jewellery we buy. The "blood diamond" has been allowed to flood back on to the world markets, he said, and in the case of Zimbabwe, would undermine all economic sanctions against Mugabe.

"It takes money to pay for violence and human rights abuses and the tap had been turned off for Mugabe and his allies," he said. "Now the Kimberley Process has turned it back on by allowing them to sell their diamonds despite clear evidence of human rights abuses and killings. The benefits from diamond sales in Zimbabwe are going directly to Mugabe and his allies. The KP is now a fig leaf for the diamond industry."

In the strongest attack yet, Global Witness is calling for a new international body to fill the void: "They have dithered around wringing their hands, and now effectively have aided and abetted the return of the blood diamond. They flunked it, dropped the ball and ordinary Zimbabweans will pay the price. It's now a myth that there are any controls over diamonds."

The issue of the profits from diamond mining being used to finance bloody conflicts in the developing world came to prominence in 2000 with the UN-commissioned Fowler Report. It showed that UN sanctions had failed to stop the Angolan civil war being financed by a trade in diamonds that saw the company De Beers openly buy $500m worth of Angolan diamonds, legal and illegal, in 1992 alone.

Davis, who took part in a recent Kimberley Process inspection team to Zimbabwe's new diamond fields, says those days have returned, as diamonds from Ivory Coast, Zimbabwe and Venezeula all escape sanctions despite evidence of corrupt and abusive practices involved in their production. The trip to Zimbabwe was marred by constant interference and obstruction, yet the official report made no mention of the obstructive behaviour of the Zimbabweans, he said.

Davis called on the Kimberley Process to "admit once and for all" that it is simply an organisation by which governments and the industry exchange information and has no practical connection with the battle for the ethical production or sale of diamonds.

"It is effectively a forum in which governments get together and swap ideas about how to better control export and import of diamonds and how to collect tax most efficiently. That's what the Kimberley Process does – no more, no less," he said.

Diamonds remain an enormously profitable business for a select few, and the trade is frequently linked to money- laundering and criminal gangs as well as the wholesale resource stripping of countries such as Congo and Angola. There are deep vested interests in keeping the trade as murky as possible, says Davis.

For the ordinary consumer, anxious not to fund a blood-stained trade, it remains all but impossible to properly source the origins of diamonds.

While one or two large firms operate "closed supply lines" – buying direct from a mine in Canada or other more easily ethically monitored countries and tracing their production all the way into their display cabinets – this is not financially viable for most jewellers.

Jeremy Hoye runs a designer jewellers chain. At its flagship store in Brighton he says around one in 20 customers will ask about the origin of the diamond.

"I'd be happier not using diamonds at all, it's so hard to know where they are coming from," he said. "You can tell by the shape where they were cut, but nothing more, and without a credible body to certify them it's a lottery. Jewellery should be about design. The issues about what is ethical in jewellery are muddied – people talk about ethical goldbut as most gold around now is recycled, it becomes a bit of a nonsense."
 
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