Ford Everest SUV Burns During Journalist's Test; No Repeatable Problems Found Yet

Ivan Leon

Expert Member
Joined
May 27, 2008
Messages
3,230
News Corp Australia’s auto writer Peter Barnwell was test-driving a 2015 Ford Everest SUV the other day when it suddenly erupted into flames. Good thing Mt. Everest isn’t a volcano or we’d have a weak pun on our hands.

Oh wait, hang on, Barnwell and his editors have us covered.

CVXKXaZUkAA0LuO.jpg

The cover to that reads “Journalist’s Review Of The New Ford Everest Is HOT Off The Presses.” Man, those print guys have all the pun. I mean fun. ZOOM! Try to keep up.

Anyway, I wasn’t sure what to make of this, since this diesel drivetrain in the Everest has been in service in the global-market Ford Ranger since 2011. Then again, Everest itself is still new. Even if it shares a platform and engine, there could be differences that lead to fiery death.

Apparently only about 1,000 examples of the new-for-2015 Everest are on the road Down Under.

Australian media dug up two other incidents they’re insinuating could be related; some guy said his 2012 Ranger XLT caught fire while parked a few weeks ago.

Another owner with Ranger XLT in another part of the country apparently had an exciting afternoon when his truck spontaneously accelerated from a cruise to almost 90 mph, and only rolled to a stop after he forced it out of gear. And yes, that one was also burning by the time it came to a stop.

Both those owners say they were forwarded to their insurance companies by Ford, which is apparently standard procedure. About 100,000 Ford Rangers are on Australia roads with similar drivetrain configurations.

Ford Australia says they are investigating the Everest incident, but it’s too early to talk recalls or mass-hysteria and, did I mention fiery death already?

The actual corporate statement is:

“We are not aware of similar reports for the new Everest and Ranger, or the outgoing Ranger. As always, we arecommitted to providing our customers with top quality vehicles. We are equally committed to addressing potential issues and responding quickly for our customers; however, we cannot comment further until our engineers complete their investigation of the Everest and determine what happened.”

We’ll keep you posted on what they learn!

http://truckyeah.jalopnik.com/journalists-ford-everest-burns-down-no-sign-of-widespr-1746676773#
 

TEXTILE GUY

Honorary Master
Joined
Oct 4, 2012
Messages
10,284
I have a burning desire to own one of these ..... wonder if comes with meat, tongs and a six pack. The perfect weekender vehicle.
 

jacodebeer

Expert Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2011
Messages
2,863
I saw one over the weekend, It's a hot motorcar...
but seriously it is quite good to look at.
 

Ivan Leon

Expert Member
Joined
May 27, 2008
Messages
3,230
I was thinking more of renaming it the Ford Krakatoa - or the Ford Etna - or even the Ford Saint Helens.
 

ChrisThomas

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2014
Messages
744
Yes you'd like to avoid it I understand. However I am sure that there would be a different response had the powers at be been given an appliance that caught fire or they had been driving their children around in another car that spontaneously burst into flames. These are people's lives we are talking about here.
 

Ivan Leon

Expert Member
Joined
May 27, 2008
Messages
3,230
You may have heard that Australian auto journalist Peter Barnwell inadvertently burned a Ford Everest SUV to the ground last week. Ford is now saying their investigation has concluded; somebody put the battery in wrong.

The official statement from Ford Australia:

“The issue arose to due to the incorrect installation of a replacement battery post production and our investigations to date have not found any other vehicles to have been subject to the same issue. The new design of the battery fuse link for Everest and higher spec Ranger models means it is not common with the prior model Ranger and Everest. All of the data collected during the exhaustive investigation to date indicates this is a situation which is not systemic to Everest or Ranger.”


Seems plausible enough. A car battery can catch fire if the positive and negative terminals get directly connected by something with decent electrical conductivity, like a piece of metal. This would cause it to get hot in a hurry. Theoretically crappy battery manufacturing or internal damage to the battery could produce the same result.

My guess; somebody let the Ford Australia press-loaner Everest battery die early on in its life and somebody else did a bad job putting in a new one. That or there’s a plot to kill Peter Barnwell. Can’t speculate on the plausibility of that, I’ve never met the guy.

The short story is Ford is officially declaring “no good reason for you not to buy a Ranger or Everest.” At least, no reason to fear fiery death.

They’re definitely going to take a hit on Australian sales though, Barnwell’s pictures were as brutal as his puns.


http://truckyeah.jalopnik.com/ford-says-incorrectly-installed-battery-caused-the-ever-1746974902
 

Rouxenator

Dank meme lord
Joined
Oct 31, 2007
Messages
37,630
They should just make sure that warnings about replacing the battery highlight these dangers.

Yet again it is a case of using replacement / non-OEM parts that caused a vehicle fire. Hopefully Ford can prevent future incidents like this and avoid a massive recall like the Zafira in the UK.
 

Archer

Honorary Master
Joined
Jan 7, 2010
Messages
21,404
I hate how car companies will never take blame. "We are investigating" wtf?
Never take blame? What then are all the safety recalls that happen??
And if you would rather have them not investigate, how do you propose they find the issue and correct it?
 

ChrisThomas

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2014
Messages
744
Never take blame? What then are all the safety recalls that happen??
And if you would rather have them not investigate, how do you propose they find the issue and correct it?
That's not what I meant.

What I meant was that a lot of times when things go bust, the car companies are the first to say that the owner did something wrong or push issues under the carpet when things are brought into the public eye. Yes obviously they should investigate, but you can't hide behind that excuse forever.
 
Top