How to vote (on the day)

MickeyD

RIP
Joined
Oct 4, 2010
Messages
139,117
Welcome to my guide to the voting process.

1: Obviously you must be registered to vote.

2: Find your correct voting station. You can check here: https://www.elections.org.za/content/For-voters/My-voter-registration-details/

3: The voting stations are open from 7am to 7pm on Wednesday, 3 August 2016. At 7pm the gates to the voting venue are locked and no voters will be allowed to enter.

4: When you arrive you will see party volunteers outside the boundary of the venue. They are there to assist you and to keep track of approximately how many voters will vote for them. They will probably ask you for some info (not who you are voting for). This is for them to roughly keep track of which of their members have voted.

5: Join the queue. If you require assistance (on crutches, etc), chat to the IEC officials. Bigger voting stations have IEC appointed queue-walkers. They will also check that you have a valid form of identification.

6: Show your valid identification document to the door controller at the entrance of the voting station. They will also check your left thumbnail to ensure that you have not already voted and then direct you to the correct first table.

7: Bigger voting stations normally have two streams inside the hall and it is usually split alphabetically based on your surname, e.g. A-M and N-Z.

8: Once inside the voting station your first stop will be at the table where the IEC official will use your ID Book or ID Smart Card and their eZiskan machine to find your name on the voters' roll. Once found a line is drawn through your record on the hard copy voters' roll. Sometimes they stamp your ID book but the introduction of Smart ID Cards makes this superfluous.

9: At the next table another IEC official will "ink" your left thumbnail. If you are wearing nail polish (or something else) they will overlap the inking onto your skin.

10: Next up is the table where the official will give you two (or three - see notes below) ballot papers. One is to vote for the ward councillor of your choice and the other for the political party of your choice. VERY IMPORTANT: Check that both ballot papers are stamped and that there are no markings on them. Ignore this and your vote could end up as spoiled.

11: Proceed to a vacant voting booth and make your X on each ballot paper. You will be alone in that booth. If you require assistance ONLY the IEC Presiding Officer may join you in the booth. For example, if you make a mistake you may ask him for new ballot papers.

12: Proceed to the ballot boxes. The IEC ballot box controller will ask to see the BACK of your ballot papers to ensure that they are stamped. You do not show them your choices.

You have now exercised your democratic right to vote!

Notes:

There are plenty of IEC officials, party officials and security personnel in the voting location. Absolutely nobody is allowed to influence your choice of ward councillor or political party.

Within the boundary of the voting station there may be NO political party advertising and their officials may not even wear their party clothing. However you as a voter can wear whatever you desire.

No weapons are allowed in the voting station.

The IEC staff are paid officials.

The majority of the political party folks on the premises are volunteers from the community and receive no payment for their services. Do not get upset with them if they ask you a question or two - and it won't be about your choice of vote.

The Ballot papers:

There are three different types of ballot papers.

People living in a metro will receive two ballot papers while people living outside of a metro (in local municipalities) will receive three ballot papers.

1: Ward ballot paper - has a grey and white background and will have a list of names of candidates contesting that specific ward.

2: Council Proportional Representation ballot paper - has a yellow background and lists the political parties contesting for seats in that Council. Councillors are appointed from the parties' PR list of candidates depending on the number of votes the party receives.

3: District Council Proportional Representation ballot paper - has a green background. Only voters living outside a metro will receive this ballot paper. Councillors are appointed to the district council based on the voting results and the party list.
 

Rickster

EVGA Fanatic
Joined
Jul 31, 2012
Messages
18,892
They are there to assist you and to keep track of approximately how many voters will vote for them. They will probably ask you for some info (not who you are voting for).


Huh?
 

MickeyD

RIP
Joined
Oct 4, 2010
Messages
139,117
Each party has their tables and/or gazebo outside the station. Voters tend to migrate to the party who they support. The party folks at the gate also tend to know most of the people entering the venue. Using that you can get a fair indication of the number of voters for the day and a rough guesstimate of how many would vote for your party.
 

The_Mowgs

Honorary Master
Joined
Nov 23, 2009
Messages
15,690
What happens if I am not at home on voting day but am still in the province but unable to go home for the day?
 

deweyzeph

Executive Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2009
Messages
8,773
Each party has their tables and/or gazebo outside the station. Voters tend to migrate to the party who they support. The party folks at the gate also tend to know most of the people entering the venue. Using that you can get a fair indication of the number of voters for the day and a rough guesstimate of how many would vote for your party.

I find this really annoying. They should ban all political parties, tables, insignia's etc from being anywhere near a polling station. Preferably further than a few kilometers.
 

ThinkCentre

Expert Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2011
Messages
3,054
If you feel you don't know who to vote for, do the "Eeny, meeny, miny, moe" thing! If you land on a party you don't like. Do it again until the party is not too bad!
 

Ho3n3r

Honorary Master
Joined
Apr 5, 2012
Messages
17,062
Each party has their tables and/or gazebo outside the station. Voters tend to migrate to the party who they support. The party folks at the gate also tend to know most of the people entering the venue. Using that you can get a fair indication of the number of voters for the day and a rough guesstimate of how many would vote for your party.

:D

Gives me incentive to show some real enthusiasm to the ANC table, just to **** with them...

They never approach us over here, though. They just sit there and stare into the distance, waiting for people.
 

Bernie

Expert Member
Joined
May 2, 2006
Messages
2,105
10: Next up is the table where the official will give you two (or three - see notes below) ballot papers. One is to vote for the ward councillor of your choice and the other for the political party of your choice. VERY IMPORTANT: Check that both ballot papers are stamped and that there are no markings on them. Ignore this and your vote could end up as spoiled.

There was a post on FB that suggested that you have to see the ballot being stamped. If you get a paper that has been pre-stamped this is an issue. I am not sure if true or not, any one else seen or heard of this.
 

MickeyD

RIP
Joined
Oct 4, 2010
Messages
139,117
There was a post on FB that suggested that you have to see the ballot being stamped. If you get a paper that has been pre-stamped this is an issue. I am not sure if true or not, any one else seen or heard of this.

Not true. The party agents are present when the ballot papers are stamped.
 

MickeyD

RIP
Joined
Oct 4, 2010
Messages
139,117
How do we know that the votes arent rigged if i may ask.
This is a municipal election therefore your name must appear on that very specific voters roll at that very specific voting station.

If it is not on the list you cannot vote.

So the maximum total number of voters per specific voting station is known before the time.

When you enter the voting station your name is marked off on the voters roll.

After voting has closed you compare the number of names marked off against the number of votes cast.

The ballot papers are also very strictly controlled. The party agents take down the serial numbers of all ballot papers. If 5000 are issued and 4000 are used, then there will be 1000 left. These will be counted by the party agents.
 

atomcrusher

Expert Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2006
Messages
4,208
Somebody asked me about the current choice we're being given in this Municipal election.... I said, Well, it's like several of the scariest movies I can imagine
Attributed to: Dean Koontz
But slightly modified ..

Also ...
The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter.
Winston Churchill
 
Last edited:

Wall

Sports Addict
Joined
Mar 12, 2009
Messages
30,809
How is it possible that my wife's voting station changed?

She is registered to vote in Durban ( her old details) - since relocating she's updated her records and voted in JHB.

In addition, when I relocated to JHB I changed my voter details and I checked the wife's details. At that point, she was registered to vote in JHB.

WTF?!?!?!?!?
 

Venomous

Honorary Master
Joined
Oct 6, 2010
Messages
54,770
Each party has their tables and/or gazebo outside the station. Voters tend to migrate to the party who they support. The party folks at the gate also tend to know most of the people entering the venue. Using that you can get a fair indication of the number of voters for the day and a rough guesstimate of how many would vote for your party.

But if I don't approach a table?
 
Top