iBurst turns to IPv6

ebendl

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Other than a lack of IPv4 addresses, does this yield any benefits to users?

Agreed. Would be nice if they could give a you a free static IPv6 address (since there's so many).

Just configured my Mikrotik router with iBurst this weekend - wonder if I need to set up something different now?
 

noswal

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So, will it make any noticeable affect when using the internet to browse, stream or download?
 

krono9

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Also wondering if this has any benefit to the average user?
 

Murmaider

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Other than a lack of IPv4 addresses, does this yield any benefits to users?

Benefits to the end user, nothing to really write home about.
Benefits to the ISP?

More Efficient Routing
IPv6 reduces the size of routing tables and makes routing more efficient and hierarchical. IPv6 allows ISPs to aggregate the prefixes of their customers' networks into a single prefix and announce this one prefix to the IPv6 Internet. In addition, in IPv6 networks, fragmentation is handled by the source device, rather than the router, using a protocol for discovery of the path's maximum transmission unit (MTU).

More Efficient Packet Processing
IPv6's simplified packet header makes packet processing more efficient. Compared with IPv4, IPv6 contains no IP-level checksum, so the checksum does not need to be recalculated at every router hop. Getting rid of the IP-level checksum was possible because most link-layer technologies already contain checksum and error-control capabilities. In addition, most transport layers, which handle end-to-end connectivity, have a checksum that enables error detection.

Directed Data Flows
IPv6 supports multicast rather than broadcast. Multicast allows bandwidth-intensive packet flows (like multimedia streams) to be sent to multiple destinations simultaneously, saving network bandwidth. Disinterested hosts no longer must process broadcast packets. In addition, the IPv6 header has a new field, named Flow Label, that can identify packets belonging to the same flow.

Simplified Network Configuration
Address auto-configuration (address assignment) is built in to IPv6. A router will send the prefix of the local link in its router advertisements. A host can generate its own IP address by appending its link-layer (MAC) address, converted into Extended Universal Identifier (EUI) 64-bit format, to the 64 bits of the local link prefix.

Support For New Services
By eliminating Network Address Translation (NAT), true end-to-end connectivity at the IP layer is restored, enabling new and valuable services. Peer-to-peer networks are easier to create and maintain, and services such as VoIP and Quality of Service (QoS) become more robust.

Security
IPSec, which provides confidentiality, authentication and data integrity, is baked into in IPv6. Because of their potential to carry malware, IPv4 ICMP packets are often blocked by corporate firewalls, but ICMPv6, the implementation of the Internet Control Message Protocol for IPv6, may be permitted because IPSec can be applied to the ICMPv6 packets.
 

Murmaider

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Unluckily, there is no performance improvement.

Technically there is better performance...

IPv6 gets rid of checksum verification. Since everything or almost everything sent via IPv6 networks has its own error-control mechanism, there was no need for one at the IP-level. This clears the overhead added by the need to do checksums at every step, leading to a more responsive and faster connection.

It's only noticeable at very high speeds.
 

ToxicBunny

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They will still need to be doing a fair chunk of tunneling to make this work for their clients though.

Its good that they're doing this, but it adds a layer of complexity to their network...
 

r00igev@@r

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They will still need to be doing a fair chunk of tunneling to make this work for their clients though.

There is no tunneling, it is a dual stack deployment. Tunneling is a possible solution if you are using an antiquated network like ADSL, 3G or LTE.
 

ToxicBunny

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There is no tunneling, it is a dual stack deployment. Tunneling is a possible solution if you are using an antiquated network like ADSL, 3G or LTE.

Whoopsie... sometimes it helps to read the article :)...

Then this is a good move from iBurst..

Come on MWeb, follow suit please...
 

ponder

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It's only noticeable at very high speeds.

This is iBurst we are talking about. IPv6's larger packet overhead is surely not gonna speed things up over slow links, and the smaller the payload the worse it gets... :D
 
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r00igev@@r

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Hello world,
Its 2020 and nothing has changed. Still only talking about IPv6!
Eish.
 

Lupus

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Hello world,
Its 2020 and nothing has changed. Still only talking about IPv6!
Eish.
Yup, I remember when I worked at IS there was a big push towards getting everything to IPv6, I left there 5 years ago and uhmmm yeah.
 

r00igev@@r

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Yup, I remember when I worked at IS there was a big push towards getting everything to IPv6, I left there 5 years ago and uhmmm yeah.
The fundamental problem has always been that there is no buy-in from any of the large ISP leadership. Recipe for failure.
 

Lupus

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The fundamental problem has always been that there is no buy-in from any of the large ISP leadership. Recipe for failure.

There was 50/50 at IS at the time, some were pushing for it, others weren't we deployed all the caching servers and SOAs with IPV6, 90% of our servers where possible were also deployed with it from 2014. Not sure if it's the case anymore though. Not even sure what the IS name servers are anymore either :)
 

r00igev@@r

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There was 50/50 at IS at the time, some were pushing for it, others weren't we deployed all the caching servers and SOAs with IPV6, 90% of our servers where possible were also deployed with it from 2014. Not sure if it's the case anymore though. Not even sure what the IS name servers are anymore either :)
All we need is one bit in the header and we can create a second IPV4 overlay network called IPV8. Keep the legacy and have a new network. 0.w.x.y.z and 1.w.x.y.z with 0.w.x.y.z being the default unless the bit is set.
problem solved.
 
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