Intel shares fall after new security flaw revealed

Jamie McKane

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#1
Intel shares fall after new security flaw revealed

Intel Corp. shares dipped after the company, whose processors power the majority of the world’s computers, revealed another potential security flaw that could allow illicit access to data.

The world’s second-largest chipmaker earlier this year released microcode and made available software Tuesday that will protect potentially vulnerable machines, the company said in a statement.

[Bloomberg]
 

sajunky

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#3
Starting recall old CPU's?

When breaks or steering can cause an accident, car manufacturers replace fauty parts at no cost....
 
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genetic

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#4
Starting recall old CPU's?

When breaks or steering can cause an accident, car manufacturers replace fauty parts at no cost....
Stupid analogy.

Mechanical issues on key components of a car can kill people. Limited CPU security flaws don't.

A potential security flaw that may affect a limited number of CPU's won't result in the end user gambling with their life every time they turn their computer on... Also this potential risk was fixed by a firmware update. :rolleyes:
 

Tovad

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#5
Stupid analogy.

Mechanical issues on key components of a car can kill people. Limited CPU security flaws don't.

A potential security flaw that may affect a limited number of CPU's won't result in the end user gambling with their life every time they turn their computer on... Also this potential risk was fixed by a firmware update. :rolleyes:
mmm if it is medical equipment or process control or any other safety critical equipment it can easily kill..

I also suppose that a home personal computer does not have the same meaning as what is used to have.

My collection of about 20 small, inexpensive to larger more expensive home computers, of which some have IoT functions, most certainly can do harm, and I suppose the same is true of Jannie van Zyl's "Home Computer System" i.e. the computer(s) that control(s) the (personal) home.
 
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genetic

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#6
mmm if it is medical equipment or process control or any other safety critical equipment it can easily kill..

I also suppose that a home personal computer does not have the same meaning as what is used to have.

My collection of about 20 small, inexpensive to larger more expensive home computers, of which some have IoT functions, most certainly can do harm, and I suppose the same is true of Jannie van Zyl's "Home Computer System" i.e. the computer(s) that control(s) the (personal) home.
The flaw is almost impossible to carry out in the real world;

The Foreshadow researchers stress the limitations and challenges of actually carrying out the attack in the wild, though. They say that cheap, easy, and effective techniques like phishing and malware distribution are still the obvious and most cost-effective choice for targeting individuals. Compared to those, Foreshadow would be impractical. Plus, SGX is a specialized feature that most people don't use. In other words, don't freak out.
https://www.wired.com/story/foreshadow-intel-secure-enclave-vulnerability/

Also Intel has already released a microcode update which fixes the vulnerability.
 
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