Intel unveils new 7th-generation Core processors

Thor

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I don't see the need to update at all I can upgrade every 4 generations probably?
 

konfab

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I don't see the need to update at all I can upgrade every 4 generations probably?
Then don't. Intel doesn't send gangs of men around to your house, threatening to put Intel inside of you unless you upgrade.
 

Ho3n3r

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I don't see the need to update at all I can upgrade every 4 generations probably?
Still running 2500K here. The prices today of new processors are especially off-putting. True, there's a relative performance upgrade, but not worth the amount of money that needs to be forked out to upgrade.
 

dualmeister

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Intel's 7th generation Core CPUs will devour 4K video

4K video is finally gaining a foothold in home theaters this year, but for most PCs it's practically kryptonite. Even if you're lucky enough to have a powerful computer, dealing with such high-resolution video is a surefire way to spike your CPU usage and gobble up battery life. So it's little surprise that Intel made 4K performance the centerpiece of its long-awaited seventh generation Core processors, which were officially announced today. You can also look forward to a slew of other speed-enhancing features when the new chips hit laptops in September.

So just how good are these new batch of Core processors? How about a CPU utilization rate of around 5 percent and power usage of 0.5 watts on the new Core i7-7500U while playing local 4K video. That's compared to 40 to 70 percent CPU usage and a 10.2 watt power draw on its predecessor, the i7-6500U. And when playing 4K VP9-encoded video on YouTube, the new seventh generation i7 clocks in at 10 to 20 percent CPU usage while drawing 0.8 watts of power. The previous chip, on the other hand, ate up 70 to 80 percent of the CPU while taking up 5.8 watts of power.
Even as a computer geek, it's been hard to get excited over new processors over the last few years. Intel, for the most part, has focused on steadily improving its lineup instead of aiming for dramatic performance gains. (My fourth-generation quad-core desktop chip can still go toe-to-toe with sixth-gen offerings.) But when it comes to 4K, Intel has delivered an evolutionary upgrade. And while it might not sound that important yet, it sets the stage for laptops and desktops that need to drive the new video standard.

Specifically, Intel added hardware encoding and decoding capabilities for both 10-bit HEVC 4K video and 8 to 10-bit VP9 video. There's also HDR and wide color gamut support, but Intel says it's up to manufacturers to implement the two competing HDR standards, Dolby Vision and HDR10. On top of just letting you watch more 4K video, the new chips' encoding performance could be a huge deal for anyone editing media, with speeds between 1X and 3X real-time for 30FPS 4K.
Source
 

Insint

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I don't see the need to update at all I can upgrade every 4 generations probably?
If you don't need to play games then you can upgrade every 6 - 10 years these days. I am still using a core 2 duo 3Ghz, geforce GTS250 computer at home and it plays 1080p flawlessly using windows 10 using with Showmax(720p) and Kodi(1080p). Just give the computer plenty of RAM when it's new and cheap. These days 16 - 32GB then it will last years and years.
 

Lupus

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What happened to the days of making the CPU a different name.
Like P4, Core 2, etc...
 

Johnatan56

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What happened to the days of making the CPU a different name.
Like P4, Core 2, etc...
I prefer this over e.g. Samsung's screen naming conventions, this way I know instantly what gen it is. They can change it once we get to 10th/11th gen or a different material.
 

Lupus

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I prefer this over e.g. Samsung's screen naming conventions, this way I know instantly what gen it is. They can change it once we get to 10th/11th gen or a different material.
I never know what generation it is without Google. In the past I knew a p4 was newer than a p3. Now I've got to go ark.intel to check.
Same as their server CPU
 

Johnatan56

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I never know what generation it is without Google. In the past I knew a p4 was newer than a p3. Now I've got to go ark.intel to check.
Same as their server CPU
What do you mean? It's always the number after the -. E.g. i5-2500k is the 2nd gen as it starts with 2, i7-4690k is 4th gen as it starts with 4. The K means it's overclock-able. If it's got a U at the end, e.g. i7-6500U, it's a dual core with hyperthreading (these are usually on laptops/tablets). If it has an HQ at the end it means it's a soldered quadcore (E.g. i7-4720HQ).


(From Quora:
U=Dual Core
M=Socketed
Q=Quad Core
H=Soldered)

Then there's the leading piece.
Atom: tablets/phones (power saving, dual/quad/octa)
Celeron: high-powered atom processors, used to be cheapest desktop processors
Pentium: entry level laptop / desktop processors, usually older designs that have already paid off their R&D costs
i3 : low desktop / laptop (dual core)
i5 : middle desktop / laptop (usually quadcore, can be dual core with hyperthreading, especially in laptops)
i7 : high end desktop / laptop (usually quadcore, recently hexcore, can be dual core with hyperthreading: denoted by U)
Xeon: server
http://www.urtech.ca/2015/10/solved-demystifying-intels-2015-2016-processors-what-is-the-difference-between-an-atom-celeron-pentium-and-core-i-series-cpus/
 
Last edited:

Lupus

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What do you mean? It's always the number after the -. E.g. i5-2500k is the 2nd gen as it starts with 2, i7-4690k is 4th gen as it starts with 4. The K means it's overclock-able. If it's got a U at the end, e.g. i7-6500U, it's a dual core with hyperthreading (these are usually on laptops/tablets). If it has an HQ at the end it means it's a hyper-threaded quadcore (E.g. i7-4720HQ).


(From Quora:
U=Dual Core
M=Socketed
Q=Quad Core
H=Soldered)
Thanks, I actually just learnt that now. I normally use ark to check.
 

Rickster

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Release new CPU
Change LGA
Force consumers to buy a new mobo
????
Profit.
 

PhireSide

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Still running 2500K here. The prices today of new processors are especially off-putting. True, there's a relative performance upgrade, but not worth the amount of money that needs to be forked out to upgrade.
I have the exact same chip on ye olde P67 chipset @ 4.5GHz. I haven't bottlenecked it (yet).

I think I will hold out a bit longer :)
 

dabbler

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I have a laptop with a i5 CPU. What generation? I don't know. It does what I need it to do.
 
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