Java: Learning to programme in

rustypup

Expert Member
Joined
Jan 28, 2016
Messages
2,340
This is fine of course, since many (most even) jobs/projects do not require developers to have a deep understanding of the underlying details
It does, however, encourage certain terrible behaviours and produces some of the world's most exploit-prone code.

Relying on the compiler to protect us from terrible coding practices is not a recipe for success. Some nuts and bolts are important.
 

John_Phoenix

Expert Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2017
Messages
1,087
Your opinion just got revealed as being based in something other than reality
:facepalm:

Do you code for free? is the object not to find a language and develop a skillset that someone is willing to pay you for?

Being good at delphi is like being able to fix Toyotas older than 40 years. Great skill to have... If you can find clients.

How do you think the DBE picks coding languages to teach in schools? On a dartboard?

Long story short, like many have said here, Python, C# or Java. These languages will take you forward, with Python casting the widest net.

Also, international opportunity, Microsoft accreditation in C# can actually get you a job in most countries.

It's very much based in reality, just not yours.
 

ronald911

Expert Member
Joined
Jun 1, 2007
Messages
2,563
Just my opinion, but it's likely they'll get bored with Java or C# as a first language....

Instead, why not get into Full Stack Web Development at first, perhaps using a web framework like Django (Python), Rails (Ruby) or Laravel (PHP).

Reason for this, you will learn all the same principles (conditions, loops, etc) as you would use in any other language, but have the 'visual' side of it as well to make it more fun, enjoyable and well, if you drop it onto a server, shareable with friends and family, which can be a huge drive especially at that age.

Just talking from personal experience...
At around the same age, I tried to teach myself C# & Java... I got around the basics of it but then got bored really quickly....
Not too long after, I wanted to build a web app because of an idea I had, so I was recommended to look into Rails or Django and that opened a lot of doors.
 

randomcat

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2018
Messages
934
I think JavaScript will be a good start, because you can achieve quite a bit with it. Throw in typescript if you want some type security. Plenty of libraries and frameworks to work with. It's just fun for the whole family.
 

rustypup

Expert Member
Joined
Jan 28, 2016
Messages
2,340
It's very much based in reality, just not yours.

One of the main reasons delphi / java is taught in schools is because Corps pay big money to government (Microsoft / Oracle, and Sun Microsystems back in the day) to be the language of choice.

Do your child a massive favour and point them in the direction of Python / C# or Go.

Stop trying to make your personal reality fit your personal delusions/ignorance.

If you're going to spew BS, own it.
 

_kabal_

Expert Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2005
Messages
3,192
Just my opinion, but it's likely they'll get bored with Java or C# as a first language....

Instead, why not get into Full Stack Web Development at first, perhaps using a web framework like Django (Python), Rails (Ruby) or Laravel (PHP).

Reason for this, you will learn all the same principles (conditions, loops, etc) as you would use in any other language, but have the 'visual' side of it as well to make it more fun, enjoyable and well, if you drop it onto a server, shareable with friends and family, which can be a huge drive especially at that age.

Just talking from personal experience...
At around the same age, I tried to teach myself C# & Java... I got around the basics of it but then got bored really quickly....
Not too long after, I wanted to build a web app because of an idea I had, so I was recommended to look into Rails or Django and that opened a lot of doors.
ASP.NET Core?
 

ronald911

Expert Member
Joined
Jun 1, 2007
Messages
2,563
ASP.NET Core?
Probably also an option.
Personally haven't experimented with that, but sure.
I just tend to forget some people still use C# for web development - but I suppose corporates love it.

Btw, I have family member who's senior IT guy at big corpo bank in SA. Directly from him, nothing "new" gets written in Java anymore. Only reason they ever need experienced Java developers is to maintain legacy software.
 
Last edited:
Top