Learning Linux

Agent_Smith

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Dec 3, 2010
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12,257
#1
Hey knowledgeable folk. I'd like to teach myself Linux and I see there are some courses available on Udemy. Would you guys recommend any of them for learning Linux or is there another way to go about it (that doesn't involve full time classes at some institution)?
 

CamiKaze

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May 19, 2010
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#2
I will email you a few books when I get home. Or attach it to this thread rather.
 

chrisc

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Aug 14, 2008
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#5
Load Ubuntu on a USB drive and do a trial run, no install

Linux is very good, but support is lacking and certain things that are easy in Windows and Mac are a big pain. Swap money for experience

In the old days, Linux would run on any old machine. Puppy Linux is ok for older PCs
 

newby_investor

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#6
Udemy courses can be very good and give you a structured approach to learning things. Most of us have learned empirically, piecing things together here and there and building up gradually. I would say it's worth the time to do one, not sure of the costs involved.

Modern Linux distros work very well, they're not as difficult as they used to be. Linux Mint passed the Grandmother test for me several years ago already.

But if you want to really learn things you would need to do a bit more than install it and fire up a browser. Books are good too, but remember that the software world is dynamic and things can change pretty quickly, so books even two or three years old can get out of date fast.
 

Agent_Smith

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#7
Udemy courses can be very good and give you a structured approach to learning things. Most of us have learned empirically, piecing things together here and there and building up gradually. I would say it's worth the time to do one, not sure of the costs involved.

Modern Linux distros work very well, they're not as difficult as they used to be. Linux Mint passed the Grandmother test for me several years ago already.

But if you want to really learn things you would need to do a bit more than install it and fire up a browser. Books are good too, but remember that the software world is dynamic and things can change pretty quickly, so books even two or three years old can get out of date fast.
Thanks. I'll still look at the Udemy courses as they're not at all expensive (about R130). But there are a few of them though so just wondered which one to look at. I'll probably just go with the highest rated one...
 

Agent_Smith

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#8
Load Ubuntu on a USB drive and do a trial run, no install

Linux is very good, but support is lacking and certain things that are easy in Windows and Mac are a big pain. Swap money for experience

In the old days, Linux would run on any old machine. Puppy Linux is ok for older PCs
Thanks mate. Will look at this too.
 

newby_investor

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#9
Thanks. I'll still look at the Udemy courses as they're not at all expensive (about R130). But there are a few of them though so just wondered which one to look at. I'll probably just go with the highest rated one...
Just looked at them quickly, there are a lot. Which you should go for depends greatly on what you intend to do though.

There are a few basics ones, which look okay to start with, but where you go from there depends on where you want to get to.

I second the suggestion to load Ubuntu on a USB-drive or even using Virtual Box. Ubuntu isn't the best distro, but it's a good starting point.
 

Budza

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Oct 14, 2008
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#10
Thanks mate. Will look at this too.
Just looked at them quickly, there are a lot. Which you should go for depends greatly on what you intend to do though.

There are a few basics ones, which look okay to start with, but where you go from there depends on where you want to get to.

I second the suggestion to load Ubuntu on a USB-drive or even using Virtual Box. Ubuntu isn't the best distro, but it's a good starting point.
Yup- good starting point.

From there you'll identify the pain points you need to swot up on.

Also, you'll get some jargon down which will also help in choosing courses.

I just have an old PC I buggered around with- taught myself on that via youtube (slower, but probably broader approach).

How much do you value your time :p
 

Agent_Smith

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#12
What's the end goal?
Well, I've been wanting to get to know Linux for a while. It would hopefully add another string to my bow and make me more marketable. I also understand that knowing Linux would aid me in coding. Not sure how relevant this might be but either way, it couldn't hurt to know the OS in some detail.
 

newby_investor

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#13
Well, I've been wanting to get to know Linux for a while. It would hopefully add another string to my bow and make me more marketable. I also understand that knowing Linux would aid me in coding. Not sure how relevant this might be but either way, it couldn't hurt to know the OS in some detail.
I'm an advocate for Linux in most cases, but it's in the end of the day just another platform. If you're a competent coder in Windows, you'll be competent in Linux, and vice versa.

Understanding Linux can however open more options for you, as many servers, embedded systems, network infrastructure things such as switches and routers, run Linux underneath.
 

Thor

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#16
Best why I learned was forcing myself to use Debian for 18 months.

(it was horrific, but it helped)
 

ronald911

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Jun 1, 2007
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#18
Linux is cool.

While I don't use it as my desktop os (I've got a Macbook) for my workflow, I do have a couple of Linux virtual private servers (Ubuntu server) from that I use to host my websites and a couple of API's that I built.

I basically learnt purely by googling every single problem I have all the time till I get to the end result.

As a developer, if I had to choose, I'll still use Linux desktop over Windows. It's definitely got a much better workflow for quickly running test servers and stuff.
 
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ronald911

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#20
Same here. I'd have appreciated some kind of course to get me up to speed with the basics quickly though.
Well, I also used this method when I learnt to code.
I tend to find that in a lot of courses they tend to get stuck on things that aren't as relevant to the things you will be using 80% of the time.
Rather than wasting time & money trying to find the right courses etc etc, rather just jump right in and google / ask people every time you get stuck. Odds are, you'll figure the important things out quicker when you're actually doing stuff on it than following a 60 hour course.

You have nothing to lose this way. :)
 
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